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By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2010
Maryland Art Place's annual Out of Order party is not your typical art auction. Any artist may contribute a work of art for a $10 contribution to MAP. That means the collection of guests is as wide-ranging as the art on the walls. There were artists such as Joyce Scott , Rams Brisueno , and Stanley Waters mingling alongside MAP Executive Director Cathy Byrd and board members Sam Polakoff , Chris Davison , Michel Modell and Patrick Sutton . Other guests included Patrycja Hollis , Alexander Design Studio architect; and Ted Frankel , Sideshow gift shop owner.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Ralph R. Baney, a sculptor and ceramic artist who taught at Dundalk Community College, died of an aortic aneurysm Jan. 21 at his Ellicott City home. He was 84. Born in Trinidad, he was the son of Baney Seecharan and Bhagia Seecharan. After study at the Teachers' College in Trinidad and Tobago, he won a government scholarship to Brighton College of Art in England. "He worked in the style of the British sculptors Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth," said Paul W. Glasgow, interim chair of the art and design department at what is now the Community College of Baltimore County.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
Maryland Art Place (MAP), founded nearly three decades ago to promote contemporary art, will move back to its former home in the developing Westside Arts District, after a decade in the Inner Harbor area. "I think we can make a real difference on the west side, not that we didn't contribute down there," said Cathy Byrd, executive director of MAP. In 1988, MAP purchased a five-story, 20,000-square-foot building on West Saratoga Street, where the organization was based until relocating the headquarters and main gallery space to Power Plant Live in 2001.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
The Maryland Arts Place announced Tuesday that it has moved from its previous home in Power Point Live to a new location in downtown Baltimore. The 33-year-old non-profit contemporary arts organization has relocated to 218 W. Saratoga St., in a building that it owns and manages for "financial and strategic reasons," according to Dawn Gavin, president of the organization's board of trustees. The move will bring the gallery under the same roof as the organization's informal nightclub, the 14 Karat Cabaret.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
The Maryland Arts Place announced Tuesday that it has moved from its previous home in Power Point Live to a new location in downtown Baltimore. The 33-year-old non-profit contemporary arts organization has relocated to 218 W. Saratoga St., in a building that it owns and manages for "financial and strategic reasons," according to Dawn Gavin, president of the organization's board of trustees. The move will bring the gallery under the same roof as the organization's informal nightclub, the 14 Karat Cabaret.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
Mina Cheon is used to seeing things from multiple perspectives. As a child in South Korea, the artist was exposed to two religious philosophies — Buddhist on her father's side, Christian on her mother's — and embraced a third as an adult, converting to Judaism when she married a Baltimore architect. When she started studying in 1997 with the celebrated abstract expressionist Grace Hartigan at the Maryland Institute College of Art , Cheon focused on traditional painting methods.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Artists looking for a place to display their work can do so for one day at the Maryland Art Place. For a contribution of $10, you can bring one ready-to-hang art work in any media, measuring 40 X 40 inches or less, to the gallery, where it will become part of the annual Out of Order benefit exhibition. All artists must do their own installation, but MAP provides the nails and hooks. There is one day set aside for installation -- artists can stop by between 7 a.m. and midnight on April 2. It's first-come, first-served in terms of location in the gallery (and, for sculptors, in terms of available pedestals)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
When it comes to festival season in Baltimore, no festival captures the city's eccentric, impossible-to-box-in arts scene like the Transmodern Festival, which kicked off Thursday night. This is Transmodern's 10th year, and like many of the artists involved, it has continued to evolve, grow and thrive. One of the obvious highlights to the weekend comes Saturday night, when some of Baltimore's most prominent independent musicians perform behind the Current Gallery (421 N. Howard St.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Artists looking for a place to display their work can do so for one day at the Maryland Art Place. For a contribution of $10, you can bring one ready-to-hang art work in any media, measuring 40 X 40 inches or less, to the gallery, where it will become part of the annual Out of Order benefit exhibition. All artists must do their own installation, but MAP provides the nails and hooks. There is one day set aside for installation -- artists can stop by between 7 a.m. and midnight on April 2. It's first-come, first-served in terms of location in the gallery (and, for sculptors, in terms of available pedestals)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013
Describing herself as a community artist who makes art for social justice seems fitting for 29-year-old Ashley Minner, who not only works in various mediums but also consults, writes grants, teaches, speaks and serves on boards for several arts organizations and projects. This stems from her growing up in the Lumbee Native American community, where Minner said she learned to "help out and give back whenever possible. " One way she does this is by facilitating an after-school art program for Native American girls.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Artist Mia Wiener embroiders provocative images on white linen because she's fascinated by the intimate nature of textiles and by the way that most people take them for granted. Emily C-D creates collages in her native Baltimore and also in Mexico from materials that other people throw away: discarded newspapers, bottle tops, string, and old pots and pans. And Ashley Minner crafts nearly life-size portraits of Baltimore's Native-American Lumbee community that revel in the beauty and strength of the people with whom she grew up. The women are part of the generation that will determine the form that the visual arts will take here in the future and are being highlighted in "Thirty: 30 Creative Minds Under 30," a group of 10 gallery talks sponsored by Maryland Art Place . The trio have been selected to present their artwork in the debut presentation on Wednesday; the remaining nine events will take place roughly once a month.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
A rumpled pile of sheets. A Bloody Mary on an airline tray. Bags of mustard greens from a Korean grocery store. Gas station pumps, battered street signs, a steamed crab. These are among the everyday images encountered by artist and University of Maryland, College Park professor Hasan Elahi. For the past decade - since he was detained by the FBI at an airport - Elahi has meticulously compiled tens of thousands of photos of each stop he makes in his day. Rather than shy from government attention, Elahi embarked on a self-surveillance project.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
Mina Cheon is used to seeing things from multiple perspectives. As a child in South Korea, the artist was exposed to two religious philosophies — Buddhist on her father's side, Christian on her mother's — and embraced a third as an adult, converting to Judaism when she married a Baltimore architect. When she started studying in 1997 with the celebrated abstract expressionist Grace Hartigan at the Maryland Institute College of Art , Cheon focused on traditional painting methods.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser | June 6, 2012
Growing up in Seoul, Mina Cheon thought everyone around her was an artist. "Having very culturally inspired parents, they took me to museums every weekend and threw parties for artists and exhibited art around the house. " But there was a different inspiration for Cheon's exhibition "Polipop & Paintings," on view at Maryland Art Place through June 30 (you can see her work under black lights from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. tomorrow). When she visited North Korea in 2004, she started creating work that "was a merger between geo-politics, global media and culture, and pop art. " Cheon, 38, who lives in "lovely, historic, pollen central Bolton Hill," chats with b about eschewing cable TV, the work she's most proud of and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Engaging, museum-level work fills two venues in Baltimore. Maryland Art Place has assembled a remarkable survey of minimalist painters from different areas and generations, while C. Grimaldis Gallery is offering a collection of pieces by five exceptional artists who produced work locally. The Grimaldis show, "Five Maryland Icons," provides a richly varied experience — and, for those in the market, a fairly expensive one, with most of the pieces priced from $3,500 to $125,000.
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