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By John-John Williams IV | August 27, 2006
Kimberly Lechlider, 19, of Laytonsville was named Miss Maryland Agriculture 2006 in a competition Friday night at the State Fair in Timonium. Lechlider, a 2005 graduate of Damascus High School who attends the University of Maryland, College Park, earned a $9,000 scholarship along with the title. She was selected from among 23 contestants. As Miss Maryland Agriculture, she will meet with fairgoers and award prizes at the fair, which runs through Sept. 4. In addition, Lechlider, who is an active member of the Montgomery County 4-H Program, Damascus Livestock Club and Montgomery County Agriculture Fair, will participate in a variety of activities associated with Maryland agriculture throughout the year.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 3, 2014
When the peaches start to come in, you have to get to the Annapolis farmers' market early on Saturday mornings. The lines at the Harris Orchard truck are polite but long, snaking out into the parking lot on Riva Road. And the peaches disappear quickly. The women making the sales and the change can look stressed by the demand, but Tony Evans never did. He'd ask you when you wanted to eat your peaches, today or later in the week? He'd choose just the right firmness for you and then spend a couple more minutes teaching you how to know when a peach is at the peak of flavor.
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NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | May 20, 2007
Data collectors will be knocking on doors across Maryland in coming weeks looking for pigs, goats cows and other animals. Field workers will gather information as part of an annual nationwide survey on land use and agriculture activity. The survey is being done for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Agriculture Statistics Services, which measures nearly every aspect of farming. Done each June, the study "is one of the largest and most comprehensive surveys conducted each year," said Barbara Rater, director of the service's Maryland office, which is in the state Department of Agriculture building in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Pat van den Beemt | July 15, 2013
The Baltimore County Center for Maryland Agriculture is broadening its horizons when it hosts a pair of events, one old and one new, at its Shawan Road site Aug 10. Considering the array of interests - beef cattle, goats, worms, vegetable gardens, rabbit-jumping contest, heirloom tomato tasting and scavenger hunt - involved, one might even describe the festival as eclectic. Everything listed, and a whole lot more, can be found at the Ag Center that day after both groups decided to hold their events on the same day in hopes of attracting more visitors.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | November 19, 2006
In Iowa, the cornfields seem to stretch forever. In Kansas, wheat spreads out as far as the eye can see. Until you reach Goodland, that is, where a 24-by-32-foot reproduction of Van Gogh's "Sunflowers" painting rests on an 80-foot easel surrounded by a sea of sunflowers. The sunflowers and that painting along Interstate 70 in northwestern Kansas got me thinking about how Maryland fits in the national farm picture. I recalled the sunflower fields near Pylesville in northern Harford County, as well as the corn, soybean and wheat fields across the state and concluded that whoever first said that Maryland was America in miniature must have been talking about agriculture.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2005
Rebecca Hamilton of Lisbon was named Miss Maryland Agriculture 2005 Friday evening on the opening day of the Maryland State Fair in Timonium. Hamilton, 16, was chosen to compete for the state title when she was named Miss Howard County Farm Bureau this month. The contest included participants from 23 counties, the largest group of competitors in six years. "I think this is going to be an incredible opportunity for me throughout the year," said Hamilton, who plans to visit every county in Maryland to increase awareness of agriculture.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2000
Concerned about the future of Maryland's largest industry, the state plans an 18-month study of agriculture as the first step toward developing a strategy to preserve and promote farming, sources said yesterday. The study is in response to a request from Ronald A. Guns, chairman of the House Environmental Matters Committee, who wants the state Agriculture Department to develop a 20-year plan to safeguard Maryland's farm industry. "We want to start the study as quickly as possible, hopefully this summer," said S. Patrick McMillan, a special assistant to state Agriculture Secretary Henry A. Virts.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2005
In Howard County, it's not the acres, it's the attitude that makes a Miss Farm Bureau. Rebecca Hamilton, who has a garden, 10 beef cattle, sheep, swine, goats and chickens on 5 acres in Lisbon, was chosen over six other competitors this week for the title. She will represent the county at the Miss Maryland Agriculture Contest at the state fair on Aug. 26. She plans to let people know that while the types of farms in the county are changing, farming remains an important part of the economy and landscape.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2010
The Maryland Agricultural Resource Council, a nonprofit organization that supports the state's farming industry, will hold an open house Saturday at the Baltimore County Center for Maryland Agriculture in Cockeysville. Visitors can tour the facility and the 140-acre grounds from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., see demonstrations in the latest farming technology, meet the staff and purchase fresh local products. The center is at 1114 Shawan Road. Information: marylandagriculture.org/wp/ or 410-887-8570.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
This could be the big summer of cider. We've fallen hard for the crisp dry hard ciders coming out of Millstone Cellars in Monkton, which are so refreshing for hot-weather dining. The Maryland Wineries will host Locapour - Drink Local , a tasting event at the Baltimore County Center for Maryland Agriculture and Farm Park on July 11 featuring five Maryland cider and mead producers. The event will include food vendors, live music and family activities. The participating wine producers are Great Shoals Winery (Princess Anne)
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Baltimore Restaurant Week is less than three weeks away. That won't  come soon enough for Baltimore restaurants, who took a beating from a slow and sultry holiday week. See: Baltimore Summer Restaurant Week 2013 [Pictures] Silo.5% Wine Bar in Locust Point, just a cannonball's throw from Fort McHenery, is offering a War of 1812-inspired menu through Saturday . Menu items include venison jerky with fig chutney, rabbit pie, salt-cured ham with sauteed crab and, for dessert, a choice of apple wedge cobbler with ice cream or a rum and honey pecan pie with spiced clotted cream.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
This could be the big summer of cider. We've fallen hard for the crisp dry hard ciders coming out of Millstone Cellars in Monkton, which are so refreshing for hot-weather dining. The Maryland Wineries will host Locapour - Drink Local , a tasting event at the Baltimore County Center for Maryland Agriculture and Farm Park on July 11 featuring five Maryland cider and mead producers. The event will include food vendors, live music and family activities. The participating wine producers are Great Shoals Winery (Princess Anne)
SPORTS
Sports Digest | September 7, 2011
USA Swimming Phelps on national team for 4 events Michael Phelps of Fells Point was among 109 swimmers named to the 2011-12 USA Swimming national team Tuesday, along with fellow 2011 world championship gold medalists Ryan Lochte , Missy Franklin and Elizabeth Beisel . Phelps qualified in four events (200-meter freestyle, 100 fly, 200 fly and 200 individual medley) as did Franklin (100 free, 100 backstroke, 200 backstroke and 200 IM) and Beisel (200 IM, 400 IM, 400 free, 200 backstroke)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2010
The Maryland Agricultural Resource Council, a nonprofit organization that supports the state's farming industry, will hold an open house Saturday at the Baltimore County Center for Maryland Agriculture in Cockeysville. Visitors can tour the facility and the 140-acre grounds from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., see demonstrations in the latest farming technology, meet the staff and purchase fresh local products. The center is at 1114 Shawan Road. Information: marylandagriculture.org/wp/ or 410-887-8570.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2010
Baltimore County has opened a $10 million agriculture center that will offer hands-on education in productive farming, research opportunities in the latest technology and year-round demonstrations in farm management. Officials said the facility promises meeting space to 4-H clubs, land associations and community groups and recreational opportunities for area residents. The Baltimore County Center for Maryland Agriculture, which opened officially Wednesday, spans 150 acres along Shawan Road in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. used the opening of the area's newest farmers market to announce he has appointed Chris McCollum director of county's $10 million agricultural center, which opens in Hunt Valley in September. Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. used the opening of the area's newest farmers market to announce he has appointed Chris McCollum director of the county's $10 million agricultural center, which opens in Hunt Valley in September. "Chris will do an excellent job managing this important facility and will provide the vision and leadership that will quickly establish it as a true focal point for local agriculture here and throughout the region," Smith said.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,special to the sun | February 1, 2007
Roger L. Richardson, a Wicomico County grain farmer, will be named the next state agriculture secretary tonight. Gov. Martin O'Malley will announce Richardson's appointment at the annual Maryland Agriculture Dinner at Michael's Eighth Avenue restaurant in Glen Burnie, said administration spokesman Rick Abbruzzese. Richardson is expected to be in attendance. Richardson, who operates a trucking company in addition to his farm, is on the board of directors of the Maryland Center for Agro-Ecology Inc., a coalition of agricultural, environmental, education and government leaders working to preserve the environment and maintain the viability of farming.
NEWS
By Christina Asquith and Christina Asquith,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 2, 1995
Elmer L. Cooper, a retired University of Maryland agriculture professor and author of two nationally recognized high school textbooks, died of lung cancer Thursday at his home in Beltsville. He was 60.A lifelong Maryland resident who was raised on a small farm in Hampstead, Dr. Cooper devoted his life to teaching and training thousands of students and future teachers in the field of agriculture.He began his career teaching vocational agriculture at North Harford High School from 1956 to 1975.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | May 4, 2008
If given a choice, the vast majority of Maryland consumers -- 76 percent -- say they are more likely to buy produce that is identified as having been grown by a state farmer. That's one of the findings in a survey earlier this year by the University of Baltimore's Schaefer Center for Public Policy, and farmers are eager to accommodate the consumers' wishes. There will be 83 farmers' markets opening this year, according to the state Department of Agriculture. This is six more than last year.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | February 3, 2008
The country has a new secretary of agriculture. He's Ed Schafer, a former two-term governor of North Dakota. He's also the grandson of a farmer who emigrated from Denmark to take up homesteading in the American northwest. Schafer's ties to agriculture go back to his family's wheat and livestock farm in Hettinger County, where he spent his summers. He says he learned firsthand about agriculture by helping out with farm chores and tinkering with engines. His new job thrusts him into the deadlocked negotiations with Congress over a new farm bill that will set federal agriculture policy for the next five years.
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