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By Joanne Cavanaugh Simpson | February 4, 2013
This is the story of a can-do, adorkable girl-in-the-city and her wacky entourage of colleagues who spoof the vagaries of a media conglomerate - and joust with their lovable anti-hero boss - to make comedy and some sense of the world. Could be the tagline of 30 Rock. Could also be a tagline for the '70s Mary Tyler Moore Show. And so, as 30 Rock winds down its seven seasons with the show's finale Thursday on NBC, I've been thinking about these comedy classics' quirky parallels.
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NEWS
By Joanne Cavanaugh Simpson | February 4, 2013
This is the story of a can-do, adorkable girl-in-the-city and her wacky entourage of colleagues who spoof the vagaries of a media conglomerate - and joust with their lovable anti-hero boss - to make comedy and some sense of the world. Could be the tagline of 30 Rock. Could also be a tagline for the '70s Mary Tyler Moore Show. And so, as 30 Rock winds down its seven seasons with the show's finale Thursday on NBC, I've been thinking about these comedy classics' quirky parallels.
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FEATURES
By Michael Hill | September 17, 1991
HOME Improvement" has the funniest pilot of the new TV season, but its time period could squelch a few laughs in future episodes.This new ABC show, which premieres tonight at 8:30 on Channel 13 (WJZ), is a showcase for comedian Tim Allen, whose stand-up routine focuses on the odd relationship between masculinity and power tools."Home Improvement" gives Allen's character of Tim Taylor his own home fix-up show in which he gets to dispense handyman wisdom and do-it-yourself tips.Then the cameras follow Taylor home where his desire to re-create the world along the lines of his ridiculous macho vision run afoul, not only of the laws of physics and gravity, but also of his wife Jill, who is quick with the ego-deflating line.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 3, 1998
It's Thursday night on the seventh floor of Hagerstown Hall dorm, and there's a party going on.Well, sort of a party.In the lounge, there are three giant bags of potato chips, two huge platters of chocolate chip cookies and a couple of cases of soft drinks. There are also 15 or so University of Maryland, College Park students in cutoffs, sweats, jeans and gym shorts eating, drinking and waiting for the start of "Seinfeld."Other dormies wander in and out. One woman dries her hair in preparation for a date that she says "will probably be totally Elainesque"; one guy slides in the door like Cosmo Kramer.
NEWS
September 14, 2008
GEORGE PUTNAM, 94 Broadcast pioneer George Putnam, the flamboyant broadcasting pioneer whose bombastic style made him one of the nation's highest-paid TV news anchors and one of its most widely lampooned, died Friday of heart failure. Putnam, one of the inspirations for The Mary Tyler Moore Show's Ted Baxter character, died at a hospital near his ranch in Chino, Calif., said Chuck Wilder, longtime producer of his syndicated radio program, George Putnam's Talk Back. Although he had been absent from television for decades, Putnam continued to do his radio show, a mix of opinion, interviews and phone calls, until just a few months ago when his health began to fail.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | May 9, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:A FAMILIAR VOICE -- One of the clever reasons for the success of "The Simpsons" is the use of well-known actors to give voice to the cartoon characters. And tonight's scheduled edition (at 8, Channel 45), brings an interesting return. The voice of Bart's elderly neighbor is that of Cloris Leachman, last seen on the tube in the 1989-90 season (as in photo below) with Harvey Korman in Mel Brooks' unfortunately underappreciated "Nutt House." Leachman, of course, was Phyllis Lyndstrom on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and then continued the character in her own spin-off, "Phyllis."
FEATURES
By Michael HIll | February 15, 1991
LAST WEEKEND it was Lucy and Ricky. This weekend, it's Archie Bunker, Ed Sullivan and Mary Richards. No wonder they used to call CBS the Tiffany's of the networks.Unable to generate many destined-to-be-classic shows these days -- "Murphy Brown," maybe "Designing Women," but can you really see "Murder, She Wrote" getting enough votes for the Hall of Fame? -- CBS is dipping into its impressive past in search of viewers.Two are 20th anniversary specials, marking two decades since a pair of CBS' best comedies went on the air. Tomorrow night at 8 o'clock, it's 90 minutes of "All in the Family."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 16, 1993
Los Angeles--The taps pour real beer. But the stuff in the glass on the bar in front of where Norm sits and drinks and drinks and drinks is the non-alcoholic kind.The yellow-and-red Wurlitzer jukebox plays real tunes: "The In Crowd" by Dobie Gray, "Heartbreak Hotel" by Elvis Presley, "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" by the Platters and "I Fall to Pieces" by Patsy Cline. But the stairs behind it are fake and go nowhere. There is no Melville's fine seafood restaurant upstairs, as the sign promises.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 16, 1992
CBS will try out six new series this summer -- two comedies and four dramas, the network has announced.The sitcoms first."Cutters" stars Dakin Matthews and Robert Hays as a father-son barbering team forced to merge with a hip beauty salon. A production of Allan Burns ("The Mary Tyler Moore Show") and Burt Metcalf ("M.A.S.H."), "Cutters" will launch in early June for five episodes."Grapevine," the brainchild of David Frankel ("Doctor, Doctor"), stars Jonathan Penner, Lynn Clark and Steven Eckholdt as Miami friends who "take an intimate, 'fly on the wall' look at relationships and go on to tell us all the dirt."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | January 4, 2008
In the year-end issue of Entertainment Weekly, critic Ken Tucker griped about DVD collections of sitcoms well past their prime - or, as he put it, "Surely there weren't that many completists clamoring for" the fifth season of Wings on DVD. Granted, the man has a point; here's betting my 10th season of even Frasier, as great a show as that was, will never get opened. But what about classic sitcoms not yet available in all their glory? I, for one (and I can't believe I'm the only one), have been waiting for the fifth season of The Mary Tyler Moore Show ever since Season 4 was released in June 2006.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | June 27, 2013
We're a bit biased, but the staff at EW are clearly geniuses.  In the magazine's latest issue, out Friday, the writers and editors have named Baltimore-set social tapestry "The Wire" as the No. 1 TV show. Of all time. Here's what they had to say: "The most sustained narrative in television history, The Wire used the drug trade in Baltimore, heavily researched by creator David Simon, to tell tales of race and class with unprecedented complexity. Politics, the war on drugs, labor unions, public education, the media - these were among the big themes, all examined through exquisitely drawn characters, such as the brilliant yet broken detective Jimmy McNulty (Dominic West)
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