Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMary Todd Lincoln
IN THE NEWS

Mary Todd Lincoln

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Laurie Kaplan | March 19, 1998
FOR years, many of the stories of important women in U.S. history went unheralded. But, in recent years, that's been less true as more books about such women have filled bookstore shelves.During Women's History Month, one such historian who deserves recognition is Jean Baker, a longtime history professor at Goucher College and author of a critically acclaimed biography of Mary Todd Lincoln.A landmark workMrs. Baker had written two books on Maryland history before her major work, "Mary Todd Lincoln: A Biography," was published in 1989.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
We have never really stopped fighting the Civil War. Probably never will. But, once in a while, maybe we can all agree that the things that once split the nation apart should not keep us apart now, that there are still things that ought to bind us together. The winter holidays seem a particularly apt time for such reflection, a time when we tend to take stock, gather around families and friends, count blessings, put hope in the next year. All of which is to say that the Baltimore premiere of Paula Vogel's "A Civil War Christmas" in a soaring production at Center Stage couldn't be more welcome or relevant.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 12, 1991
EXCERPT FROM Kitty Kelley's new book "Mary Todd Lincoln: The Unauthorized Biography." (Simon & Schuster, $24.95):. . . the whole business of the Emancipation Proclamation which Lincoln, the gin fumes rolling off him, had nothing to do with, as we shall soon see.The year was 1862. The war between the North and South was raging. Union forces had bogged down near Richmond and suffered another serious setback at Bull Run. Mary Todd Lincoln was desperate to lift the gloom that enveloped Washington and to avert attention from her scandalous affair with prominent abolitionist Elijah Cummings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
Tragedy seemed to stalk Mary Todd Lincoln as surely as it did her husband. Long before that Good Friday in 1865 when the Lincolns decided to attend Ford's Theatre, it was clear that the mental health of the president's wife had begun to fray. To this day, she is a riveting figure. There's something of a Shakespearean dimension about her personality and her life, which, post-Washington, included stints in a mental asylum. No wonder she dominates the uneven, but intriguing, new play by Tazewell Thompson, although the first lady gets only half the title.
NEWS
By NEIL A. GRAUER | January 2, 1997
RECENT REPORTS SAY the Clinton White House has put a pretty stiff price tag on the right to spend a night in the Lincoln Bedroom.Fat cats apparently have to raise or fork over $750,000 to $1.2 million for the Democratic National Committee in order to curl up in the Lincoln Bed.President Clinton can't be accused of deceptive advertising in billing that commodious second-floor bedroom in the White House as Lincoln's. The designation stretches back over administrations of both parties.But any deep-pocketed political contributor who lands himself a night in the Lincoln Bedroom, will be doing something Abraham Lincoln never did. In fact, historians are certain he never even slept in the ''Lincoln Bed.''The wandering bedWhen the White House celebrated its 200th birthday in 1992, Life magazine and other publications marked the occasion with lengthy articles on the mansion, its inhabitants and lore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
Tragedy seemed to stalk Mary Todd Lincoln as surely as it did her husband. Long before that Good Friday in 1865 when the Lincolns decided to attend Ford's Theatre, it was clear that the mental health of the president's wife had begun to fray. To this day, she is a riveting figure. There's something of a Shakespearean dimension about her personality and her life, which, post-Washington, included stints in a mental asylum. No wonder she dominates the uneven, but intriguing, new play by Tazewell Thompson, although the first lady gets only half the title.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | May 18, 2008
The Lincolns Portrait of a Marriage By Daniel Mark Epstein Ballantine Books / 544 pages / $28 Leo Tolstoy was wrong. Happy families are not all alike - nor is every unhappy family unhappy in its own way. Enduring marriages, in fact, are - serially and simultaneously - happy and unhappy. As Daniel Mark Epstein reminds us, they rarely follow "a simple trajectory," proceeding instead "in a jagged arc, as husband and wife agree, disagree, compromise, and experience estrangement and reconciliation in the adventure of their life together."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
He was a tall, gangly, socially awkward, self-taught hayseed who became our 16th president. She was a flirtatious, attractive child of privilege who became his wife. He is revered as an American martyr and perhaps our greatest president. She's remembered, if at all, as the first lady committed to an insane asylum. On PBS over the next three nights, "Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided" will spend six hours telling the story of this unlikely couple. And while the story is beautifully told -- no surprise, since the "American Experience" installment was directed by David Grubin ("Napoleon")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
We have never really stopped fighting the Civil War. Probably never will. But, once in a while, maybe we can all agree that the things that once split the nation apart should not keep us apart now, that there are still things that ought to bind us together. The winter holidays seem a particularly apt time for such reflection, a time when we tend to take stock, gather around families and friends, count blessings, put hope in the next year. All of which is to say that the Baltimore premiere of Paula Vogel's "A Civil War Christmas" in a soaring production at Center Stage couldn't be more welcome or relevant.
NEWS
By Christi Parsons and Christi Parsons,Chicago Tribune | May 8, 1994
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. -- Over the years, Mary Todd Lincoln has been called a shrew, a hellcat and a nut.Now, new revelations from a close friend of her husband, Abraham Lincoln, suggest another title may be in order: thief.Selections of diaries of U.S. Sen. Owen Hickman Browning of Illinois recount detailed charges by a judge and a mansionservant that the controversial first lady engaged in -- among other things -- rampant padding of the White House expense account.The juicy details have been hidden in a state library in Springfield since the 1920s, by order of a Browning descendant who liked Mrs. Lincoln and wanted to protect her. Historians have long read the Browning diaries for information about the Lincoln era, but they were never allowed to see a handful of entries expunged as a condition of sale to the state.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | May 18, 2008
The Lincolns Portrait of a Marriage By Daniel Mark Epstein Ballantine Books / 544 pages / $28 Leo Tolstoy was wrong. Happy families are not all alike - nor is every unhappy family unhappy in its own way. Enduring marriages, in fact, are - serially and simultaneously - happy and unhappy. As Daniel Mark Epstein reminds us, they rarely follow "a simple trajectory," proceeding instead "in a jagged arc, as husband and wife agree, disagree, compromise, and experience estrangement and reconciliation in the adventure of their life together."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
He was a tall, gangly, socially awkward, self-taught hayseed who became our 16th president. She was a flirtatious, attractive child of privilege who became his wife. He is revered as an American martyr and perhaps our greatest president. She's remembered, if at all, as the first lady committed to an insane asylum. On PBS over the next three nights, "Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided" will spend six hours telling the story of this unlikely couple. And while the story is beautifully told -- no surprise, since the "American Experience" installment was directed by David Grubin ("Napoleon")
NEWS
By Laurie Kaplan | March 19, 1998
FOR years, many of the stories of important women in U.S. history went unheralded. But, in recent years, that's been less true as more books about such women have filled bookstore shelves.During Women's History Month, one such historian who deserves recognition is Jean Baker, a longtime history professor at Goucher College and author of a critically acclaimed biography of Mary Todd Lincoln.A landmark workMrs. Baker had written two books on Maryland history before her major work, "Mary Todd Lincoln: A Biography," was published in 1989.
NEWS
By NEIL A. GRAUER | January 2, 1997
RECENT REPORTS SAY the Clinton White House has put a pretty stiff price tag on the right to spend a night in the Lincoln Bedroom.Fat cats apparently have to raise or fork over $750,000 to $1.2 million for the Democratic National Committee in order to curl up in the Lincoln Bed.President Clinton can't be accused of deceptive advertising in billing that commodious second-floor bedroom in the White House as Lincoln's. The designation stretches back over administrations of both parties.But any deep-pocketed political contributor who lands himself a night in the Lincoln Bedroom, will be doing something Abraham Lincoln never did. In fact, historians are certain he never even slept in the ''Lincoln Bed.''The wandering bedWhen the White House celebrated its 200th birthday in 1992, Life magazine and other publications marked the occasion with lengthy articles on the mansion, its inhabitants and lore.
NEWS
By Christi Parsons and Christi Parsons,Chicago Tribune | May 8, 1994
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. -- Over the years, Mary Todd Lincoln has been called a shrew, a hellcat and a nut.Now, new revelations from a close friend of her husband, Abraham Lincoln, suggest another title may be in order: thief.Selections of diaries of U.S. Sen. Owen Hickman Browning of Illinois recount detailed charges by a judge and a mansionservant that the controversial first lady engaged in -- among other things -- rampant padding of the White House expense account.The juicy details have been hidden in a state library in Springfield since the 1920s, by order of a Browning descendant who liked Mrs. Lincoln and wanted to protect her. Historians have long read the Browning diaries for information about the Lincoln era, but they were never allowed to see a handful of entries expunged as a condition of sale to the state.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 12, 1991
EXCERPT FROM Kitty Kelley's new book "Mary Todd Lincoln: The Unauthorized Biography." (Simon & Schuster, $24.95):. . . the whole business of the Emancipation Proclamation which Lincoln, the gin fumes rolling off him, had nothing to do with, as we shall soon see.The year was 1862. The war between the North and South was raging. Union forces had bogged down near Richmond and suffered another serious setback at Bull Run. Mary Todd Lincoln was desperate to lift the gloom that enveloped Washington and to avert attention from her scandalous affair with prominent abolitionist Elijah Cummings.
NEWS
By COLLEEN MASTONY and COLLEEN MASTONY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 12, 2006
BATAVIA, Ill. -- The portrait of Abraham Lincoln hanging in the entranceway is one of the only hints of the building's lost history. Bellevue Place, a grand structure with a limestone facade and towering windows, was once a sanitarium for women - and in the summer of 1875 a Cook County jury declared Mary Todd Lincoln insane and sent her here against her will. The building is now an apartment complex, and the details of Lincoln's stay have been lost in the passage of time. But current residents say they often wonder about the former first lady.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 14, 1994
HILLARY CLINTON is said to regard recent criticism of her as unprecedented for a first lady. It's not.Eleanor Roosevelt was a target of lots of poison pens and tongues. Because she associated with some very left-wing individuals and groups, many critics called her a Communist sympathizer, if not in fact a Communist.But even that was tame compared to the attacks on an earlier first lady. Mary Todd Lincoln's critics called her a traitor to her country, a spy for the Confederacy.The excuse for this calumny was that her family included many members who favored secession and the Confederacy.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.