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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2003
Two months after John Wilkes Booth was shot to death in a burning barn in Bowling Green, Va., Mary E. Surratt and three men were executed for conspiring with Booth to kill President Abraham Lincoln. One hundred thirty-eight years after Surratt, a devout Roman Catholic, went to her death on the gallows at Washington's Arsenal Prison, doubt persists about her role in the April 1865 murder of the president. Born Mary Elizabeth Jenkins in 1823 in Southern Maryland, she was educated at a parochial school in Alexandria, Va. She was married in 1840 to John Harrison Surratt.
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By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
It wouldn't be a historic anniversary if there wasn't a Hollywood tie-in of some sort. Turner Classic Movies network has scheduled a whole month of Civil War programming. And the History Channel is filled with documentaries, interactive online features, DVD set specials and even online games, like the National Civil War Student Challenge. Coincidentally timed to open in theaters nationwide Friday is "The Conspirator," Robert Redford's story of Mary Surratt, the Marylander who was implicated in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and was eventually executed by the federal government.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
It wouldn't be a historic anniversary if there wasn't a Hollywood tie-in of some sort. Turner Classic Movies network has scheduled a whole month of Civil War programming. And the History Channel is filled with documentaries, interactive online features, DVD set specials and even online games, like the National Civil War Student Challenge. Coincidentally timed to open in theaters nationwide Friday is "The Conspirator," Robert Redford's story of Mary Surratt, the Marylander who was implicated in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and was eventually executed by the federal government.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 14, 2008
Helen S. Heisler, a longtime volunteer and Guilford resident, died of colon cancer Thursday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 92. Helen Surratt was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Woodberry neighborhood. After graduating from Seton High School in 1933, she worked in a number of administrative jobs, including assistant treasurer for a decade at the Hertz rental car office in downtown Baltimore. From 1947 to 1951, Mrs. Heisler was an aide to Gov. William Preston Lane Jr. in his Baltimore office.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 14, 2008
Helen S. Heisler, a longtime volunteer and Guilford resident, died of colon cancer Thursday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 92. Helen Surratt was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Woodberry neighborhood. After graduating from Seton High School in 1933, she worked in a number of administrative jobs, including assistant treasurer for a decade at the Hertz rental car office in downtown Baltimore. From 1947 to 1951, Mrs. Heisler was an aide to Gov. William Preston Lane Jr. in his Baltimore office.
NEWS
By JEFFREY St. JOHN | March 10, 1993
Randolph, Virginia.-- A lawyer is the last person one should trust when it comes to historical judgments. Lawyers are by training truth trimmers; they omit evidence and testimony damaging to their case.This clearly happened on Lincoln's birthday at the University of Richmond's T.C. Williams Law School when a three-judge moot (or mock) appeals court concluded that a Union army tribunal in 1865 unfairly convicted Dr. Samuel A. Mudd as one of eight conspirators in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.
FEATURES
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 13, 1997
Of all the millions of bullets fired during the American Civil War, that with the most resonance was the fatal shot into the back of Abraham Lincoln's head by the assassin John Wilkes Booth at Ford's Theatre in Washington on the night of April 14, 1865.Coming just 12 days after the fall of Richmond and five after Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox, that murderous moment served as the climax of the Civil War.Presence of LincolnEven now, watching a modern-day musical in this handsomely restored 19th-century theater, one senses Lincoln's melancholy presence behind the drapes of that always-vacant box. At the annual Ford's Theatre Gala celebrations held early every spring (the 1997 gala ended last month)
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
John C. Brennan, whose fascination with Abraham Lincoln's assassination led to 30 years of research and writing on the subject, died of cancer Feb. 6 at Golden Oaks Nursing Home in Laurel. He was 87.A Laurel resident since 1946, he retired as a personnel specialist for the Federal Reserve Board in 1963, the year that President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. That event stoked his interest in the Lincoln assassination.In 1975, he was a charter member of the Surratt Society, which xTC promotes historical research and interpretation of the Surratt family home in Clinton, formerly Surrattsville.
FEATURES
By Peter Landry and Peter Landry,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 5, 1994
By the time he took control of the prisoners, Brevet Maj. Gen. John Frederick Hartranft had put his Norristown, Pa., youth behind him, along with the Civil War battles of Antietam and Vicksburg and the years it had taken to restore his reputation after his men backed out of the first battle of Bull Run.By the summer of 1865, he was provost marshal of Washington, D.C., and charged with the care of four of the most hated people in America:The three men and...
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 14, 1991
BRYANTOWN -- It's been 20-some years now since Louis Mudd Arehart figured it out: The knocks on the door but no one there; the man in her yard in La Plata who disappeared; the same man in her dining room, who vanished into the hall when she walked toward him.It was her grandfather, she swears, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd Jr., the man who set the broken leg of John Wilkes Booth as he tried to escape south after assassinating Abraham Lincoln. Dr. Mudd had returned from the grave to tell his granddaughter to do something with his house.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2003
Two months after John Wilkes Booth was shot to death in a burning barn in Bowling Green, Va., Mary E. Surratt and three men were executed for conspiring with Booth to kill President Abraham Lincoln. One hundred thirty-eight years after Surratt, a devout Roman Catholic, went to her death on the gallows at Washington's Arsenal Prison, doubt persists about her role in the April 1865 murder of the president. Born Mary Elizabeth Jenkins in 1823 in Southern Maryland, she was educated at a parochial school in Alexandria, Va. She was married in 1840 to John Harrison Surratt.
NEWS
By JEFFREY St. JOHN | March 10, 1993
Randolph, Virginia.-- A lawyer is the last person one should trust when it comes to historical judgments. Lawyers are by training truth trimmers; they omit evidence and testimony damaging to their case.This clearly happened on Lincoln's birthday at the University of Richmond's T.C. Williams Law School when a three-judge moot (or mock) appeals court concluded that a Union army tribunal in 1865 unfairly convicted Dr. Samuel A. Mudd as one of eight conspirators in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.
TRAVEL
By Michael A. Schuman and Michael A. Schuman,Special to the Sun | April 15, 2001
If he were alive today, John Wilkes Booth would have little trouble recognizing the farmhouse of Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, where he had come seeking help 136 years ago today. The land surrounding the Southern Maryland house looks much as it did when Booth, in pain from a broken leg, knocked on Mudd's door some six hours after the actor fatally shot Abraham Lincoln about 30 miles away at Ford's Theatre in Washington. If you want to see the Mudd house in its natural surroundings, don't wait too long.
NEWS
By George W. Liebmann | March 1, 2010
The controversy over the upcoming Khalid Sheikh Mohammed trial has not enlightened the public. Those who would deny rights to persons denounced by the president and those who automatically reject all alternatives to criminal trials have seen to that. Prisoners of war are persons captured in uniform of whose enemy status there is no doubt. They may be confined indefinitely but have the right not to be questioned. Bush-Cheney defenders uphold unlimited detention but not its confining factors: undisputed belligerency of the captive and freedom from questioning and torture.
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