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Mary Shelley

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By Laura Demanski and By Laura Demanski,Special to the Sun | August 26, 2001
Mary Shelley, by Miranda Seymour. Grove. 655 pages. $35. In the 150 years since her death, Mary Shelley has suffered at the hands of literary critics and historians in thrall to her more illustrious friends and relations. Now, in Miranda Seymour, she finds a biographer both meticulous and sympathetic. Seymour has written notably as a literary historian before, on the social circle of Henry James. Mary Shelley stands as her first major biography -- one that should be welcomed as the major biography of a major author whose reputation has rested too heavily on those of her husband, father, mother and monster.
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NEWS
October 31, 2012
The talents of students from three local schools will be on stage beginning this evening, Friday, Oct. 26, when the Loyola Blakefield Players present its fall drama, "Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus," the classic tale of horror about a scientist who re-animates a corpse. The story was originally published in 1818, and has had numerous screen and stage re-creations. It was was modified for the stage by Victor Gialanella from the novel by Mary Shelley. The Loyola Blakefield production stars senior Tim Neil as scientist Victor Frankenstein, and freshman Nigel Goldsborough as The Creature.
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NEWS
By CHARLES MATTHEWS and CHARLES MATTHEWS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2006
The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler Little, Brown / 336 pages / $24.95 The sleep of reason brings forth monsters," proclaimed one of Goya's best-known etchings, created when Europe, having dozed off at the end of its Age of Reason, was awakening to some real monsters: the Reign of Terror and the Napoleonic wars. And there were fictional ones too: the horrors of the Gothic novel, and the most famous Gothic of them all, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | October 31, 2006
One of the scariest moments in the horror movie genre is when the baby-sitter gets the telephone call telling her, "He's in the house with you!" The "he," of course, is the bad guy/murderer/monster. The week leading up to today's celebration of Halloween has given us lots of spine chillers to entertain us. One of the classic scary bad-guy stories is Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley. A best-seller in 1816 and rarely out of print since, Frankenstein is probably the most beautifully written of all scary books.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1998
Unlike many 13-year-olds, Havre de Grace resident Joey Russell is not obsessed with the movie "Titanic." But he is hoping that the mania surrounding James Cameron's blockbuster will help fetch a good price for the antique Titanic postcard he's auctioning.The silent auction -- bids must be placed before 4 p.m. April 22 -- is being held to raise money for Mary Shelley, the mother of Joey's friend and classmate Kate Shelley, who has leukemia and needs a bone marrow transplant.The card is autographed by a survivor who was 15 when the grand ship sank April 14, 1912.
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | October 31, 2006
One of the scariest moments in the horror movie genre is when the baby-sitter gets the telephone call telling her, "He's in the house with you!" The "he," of course, is the bad guy/murderer/monster. The week leading up to today's celebration of Halloween has given us lots of spine chillers to entertain us. One of the classic scary bad-guy stories is Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley. A best-seller in 1816 and rarely out of print since, Frankenstein is probably the most beautifully written of all scary books.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | October 25, 1998
Turn back the clock to an era when truth was taken to be beauty and beauty truth, and a pre-eminent poet could declare with conviction that "that is all ye know on earth, and all ye need to know."John Keats' odes, including that glory addressed to a Grecian Urn, were published about 1820, the very peak of Romanticism. Keats was a pal of Percy Bysshe Shelley and his child-bride, Mary. Romantics all, they were a rough crowd, nonetheless, breaking marriage vows all over the place, living mainly in Italy more or less to avoid creditors and aggrieved spouses.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper | May 13, 1991
MARY DIANA DODS, A GENTLEMAN AND A SCHOLAR. By Betty T. Bennett. William Morrow. 304 pages. $22.95. FRANKENSTEIN," Mary Shelley's 19th century classic, tells the story of a scientist who creates a monster, which destroys him.Mary Shelley, second wife of the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, was 19 when a nightmare inspired her to write her strange masterpiece. Seven years later in 1825, after the deaths of her husband and three of her four children, Shelley produced an even stranger tale. In this one, Shelley created a man -- actually, ,, two men -- from a woman.
NEWS
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,special to the sun | February 18, 1996
"Lord of the Dead: A Secret History of Byron," by Tom Holland. Pocket Books. $23 To pass the time on a rainy summer night in Switzerland, Lord Byron and Mary Shelley created two enduring tales of horror, one featuring a vampire and the other a man-made mqonster. This little exercise in story-telling inspired Mary Shelley to write "Frankenstein," but Byron could not be bothered to put his tale on paper, leaving that task to his foppish doctor, John Polidori, whose short work, "The Vampyre" (1819)
NEWS
October 31, 2012
The talents of students from three local schools will be on stage beginning this evening, Friday, Oct. 26, when the Loyola Blakefield Players present its fall drama, "Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus," the classic tale of horror about a scientist who re-animates a corpse. The story was originally published in 1818, and has had numerous screen and stage re-creations. It was was modified for the stage by Victor Gialanella from the novel by Mary Shelley. The Loyola Blakefield production stars senior Tim Neil as scientist Victor Frankenstein, and freshman Nigel Goldsborough as The Creature.
NEWS
By CHARLES MATTHEWS and CHARLES MATTHEWS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2006
The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler Little, Brown / 336 pages / $24.95 The sleep of reason brings forth monsters," proclaimed one of Goya's best-known etchings, created when Europe, having dozed off at the end of its Age of Reason, was awakening to some real monsters: the Reign of Terror and the Napoleonic wars. And there were fictional ones too: the horrors of the Gothic novel, and the most famous Gothic of them all, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2001
Mary Louise Shelley, a retired secretary who was part of her husband's ministry to alcoholics, died Monday of a heart attack at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 79 and had lived in Timonium since 1998, after four decades in Baltimore's Charles Village and Remington neighborhoods. The wife of Father Harry E. Shelley, an Episcopal priest who died Aug. 30, she had worked with him in his ministries to alcoholics and hospice patients at the Church of the Guardian Angel in Remington, St. Michael & All Angels in Charles Village and Mount Calvary Episcopal Church in downtown Baltimore, where she remained a communicant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Demanski and By Laura Demanski,Special to the Sun | August 26, 2001
Mary Shelley, by Miranda Seymour. Grove. 655 pages. $35. In the 150 years since her death, Mary Shelley has suffered at the hands of literary critics and historians in thrall to her more illustrious friends and relations. Now, in Miranda Seymour, she finds a biographer both meticulous and sympathetic. Seymour has written notably as a literary historian before, on the social circle of Henry James. Mary Shelley stands as her first major biography -- one that should be welcomed as the major biography of a major author whose reputation has rested too heavily on those of her husband, father, mother and monster.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | October 22, 2000
The dark and stormy night on which the young Mary Shelley penned the tale now known as "Frankenstein" has been the stuff of literary myth and cinematic overkill for ages. Now comes Argentinian novelist Federico Andahazi with "The Merciful Women" (Grove Press, 188 pages, $22), a dark and wickedly witty turn on the events of that fateful evening. Andahazi chooses for his sorry protagonist Dr. John Polidori, Lord Byron's secretary, the proverbial fifth wheel at the gothic bacchanal that included Byron, Percy and Mary Shelley and Mary's cousin, Claire.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | October 25, 1998
Turn back the clock to an era when truth was taken to be beauty and beauty truth, and a pre-eminent poet could declare with conviction that "that is all ye know on earth, and all ye need to know."John Keats' odes, including that glory addressed to a Grecian Urn, were published about 1820, the very peak of Romanticism. Keats was a pal of Percy Bysshe Shelley and his child-bride, Mary. Romantics all, they were a rough crowd, nonetheless, breaking marriage vows all over the place, living mainly in Italy more or less to avoid creditors and aggrieved spouses.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1998
Unlike many 13-year-olds, Havre de Grace resident Joey Russell is not obsessed with the movie "Titanic." But he is hoping that the mania surrounding James Cameron's blockbuster will help fetch a good price for the antique Titanic postcard he's auctioning.The silent auction -- bids must be placed before 4 p.m. April 22 -- is being held to raise money for Mary Shelley, the mother of Joey's friend and classmate Kate Shelley, who has leukemia and needs a bone marrow transplant.The card is autographed by a survivor who was 15 when the grand ship sank April 14, 1912.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | October 22, 2000
The dark and stormy night on which the young Mary Shelley penned the tale now known as "Frankenstein" has been the stuff of literary myth and cinematic overkill for ages. Now comes Argentinian novelist Federico Andahazi with "The Merciful Women" (Grove Press, 188 pages, $22), a dark and wickedly witty turn on the events of that fateful evening. Andahazi chooses for his sorry protagonist Dr. John Polidori, Lord Byron's secretary, the proverbial fifth wheel at the gothic bacchanal that included Byron, Percy and Mary Shelley and Mary's cousin, Claire.
NEWS
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,special to the sun | February 18, 1996
"Lord of the Dead: A Secret History of Byron," by Tom Holland. Pocket Books. $23 To pass the time on a rainy summer night in Switzerland, Lord Byron and Mary Shelley created two enduring tales of horror, one featuring a vampire and the other a man-made mqonster. This little exercise in story-telling inspired Mary Shelley to write "Frankenstein," but Byron could not be bothered to put his tale on paper, leaving that task to his foppish doctor, John Polidori, whose short work, "The Vampyre" (1819)
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