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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
In 1695, the biggest and most fashionable private residence in St. Mary's City, and one of the most impressive in all of English America, was mysteriously blown apart by 900 pounds of gunpowder stored in its cellar.The mansion -- called St. Peter's Freehold by its owner, Maryland Chancellor Philip Calvert -- was never rebuilt. Maryland's capital was moved from St. Mary's to Annapolis, the settlement vanished beneath farmers' plows, and the location and appearance of St. Peter's were forgotten.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
It's been 75 years since Marylanders last got a look at the 17th-century document in which King James I declared George Calvert the first Lord Baltimore. But they'll get another chance Saturday as the continuing celebration of the state's 375th birthday reaches Historic St. Mary's City. Visitors to the state's archaeological museum village, on the site of the colony's first capital, will also enjoy tall ships, music, a "1634 ale" specially brewed for the occasion, food and entertainment.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1994
After two close calls, state preservationists finally have won their battle to buy Clocker's Fancy, the St. Mary's County estate that may contain the oldest wood-frame residence in Maryland.Owners of the 19-acre waterfront parcel next to Historic St. Mary's City, the site of Maryland's first capital, agreed yesterday to sell the property to the state for $350,000.The agreement came after a series of events that included the auction company's chipping in $20,000 to lift the state's $330,000 bid past a last-minute competing bid of $340,000.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
ST. MARY'S CITY -Henry Miller's assignment might have been hopeless. As research director for Historic St. Mary's City, he was expected to guide the reconstruction of the first Roman Catholic house of worship in English America, for which no drawings or even written descriptions have ever been found. All that was left of the 1667 Brick Chapel in Maryland's first Colonial capital were its huge, 3-foot-thick brick foundation and thousands of fragments of glass, lead, brick and plaster sifted from the soil during 20 years of painstaking archaeology.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
ST. INIGOES - After nearly 20 years of searching along a riverside here, archaeologists say they have found one of the oldest English footholds in Maryland - a Jesuit plantation called St. Inigoes House. Historians say the Jesuits arrived with the first settlers in 1634, aboard the Ark and the Dove, and built their first chapel in St. Mary's City. By 1638, they were also harvesting tobacco and corn at St. Inigoes to finance their mission to convert and educate Indians and colonists. Yesterday, at the U.S. Navy's Webster Field where the discoveries were made, archaeologists displayed fragments of Indian tobacco pipes, trade beads, lead shot, gun flint and European domestic refuse.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | March 19, 1995
It's Maryland's 361st birthday, and a good place to celebrate is the state's original settlement and capital at St. Mary's City. "Maryland Days" will be held there with pomp and pageantry from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and March 26Visitors will be transported by horse-drawn wagon from the Visitor Center to the activities in Governor's Field, or they can use the free shuttle bus. There will be displays by Maryland museums in the Visitor Center, and the...
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | January 30, 1997
For her exhibit "Alternate Encyclopedia," showing at St. Mary's College where she teaches, Sue Johnson creates prints which combine animal and plant forms from old sources into hybrid creatures that never existed but look as if they might have. They include "The habitat of the enigmatic Faucet Tree Owl," which shows an owl with a flower growing out of its head, sitting on a tree branch that's actually a water faucet. And "Rabbit Bush (extinct, last spotted 1838)," shown here, a combo that looks like a rabbit growing out of the top of a bush.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO | July 27, 2006
`Abilities Count' The lowdown -- The "Abilities Count" Sports Expo will take place tomorrow at the Farring-Baybrook Recreation Center. Adults and children with disabilities have the chance to go kayaking and horseback riding, and play other sports. If you go -- The recreation center is at 4501 Farring Court. All participants must pre-register. Call 410-396-7072. Great Grapes The lowdown -- Sample hundreds of wines from around the globe, listen to live music and see wine pairing demonstrations at the Great Grapes Wine, Arts and Food Festival this weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 27, 1997
Giving Thanks at Historic St. Mary's CityFor a look at how our Colonial ancestors celebrated the end of the harvest season, attend "Giving Thanks: Hearth and Home in Early Maryland" tomorrow and Saturday at Historic St. Mary's City, an outdoor living history museum at the site where Maryland's first settlement and capital were founded in 1634.The museum-wide exploration of 17th-century food-ways includes demonstrations of hearth cooking, pickling meats and vegetables, preserving fruits, dairying, smoking and drying.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Teara D. Quamina | March 19, 1998
Maryland's 364thCelebrate Maryland's 364th birthday with a festival and a party Saturday and Sunday in Historic St. Mary's City, Maryland's first capital. Saturday's festival includes pageantry, music, a militia muster by the St. Mary's City Militia, horse-drawn wagon ride and archaeological excavations. The official birthday commemoration will take place on Sunday at 1 p.m. with the colorful Ceremony of the Flags, featuring fourth-graders from Baltimore City and every Maryland county, the opening of the "Colonial Capitals of the Chesapeake: Jamestown and St. Mary's City" and a 1992 St. Mary's City excavation, "Project Lead Coffins: The Search for Maryland's Founders."
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,SUN REPORTER | August 21, 2008
The Board of Public Works approved two waterfront development proposals yesterday over the objections of environmental activists in Talbot and St. Mary's counties, though Gov. Martin O'Malley issued sharp rebukes to state officials for their handling of community relations. The board - consisting of O'Malley, State Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp and Comptroller Peter Franchot - voted unanimously to approve a wetlands license needed for the development of a 30-slip "community marina" at a major new residential development in Easton.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun Reporter | May 10, 2008
St. Mary's City -- Nezia Munezero and her 10-member family spent years running from one East African refugee camp to another, staying one step ahead of death in a world torn by ethnic warfare and genocide. In 2002, they were resettled in Baltimore. At age 16 and with no knowledge of English, she enrolled at the now-shuttered Southwestern High School and lived in a grim neighborhood beset by urban crime. It was a stepping-stone to a better life, but also another place to flee. "Students at Southwestern weren't friendly toward immigrants," said Munezero, 22, a slight woman with a lilting accent.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | January 30, 2008
ST. MARY'S CITY -- From the outside, the new brick classroom building at St. Mary's College looks much like the other Colonial-style structures on the riverfront campus of this small, historic liberal-arts school. But inside, Goodpaster Hall represents something very different for St. Mary's - and for the rest of Maryland. From the recycled wood flooring to the sod covering part of its roof, it is one of the state's first "green" college buildings, and a potential prototype for many more such taxpayer-funded facilities to come.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO | July 27, 2006
`Abilities Count' The lowdown -- The "Abilities Count" Sports Expo will take place tomorrow at the Farring-Baybrook Recreation Center. Adults and children with disabilities have the chance to go kayaking and horseback riding, and play other sports. If you go -- The recreation center is at 4501 Farring Court. All participants must pre-register. Call 410-396-7072. Great Grapes The lowdown -- Sample hundreds of wines from around the globe, listen to live music and see wine pairing demonstrations at the Great Grapes Wine, Arts and Food Festival this weekend.
NEWS
July 16, 2006
On July 11, 2006, RON SIEGERT, husband of Jeannette Willard Siegert; father of Michael, Kim and Steve Siegert; grandfather of Shannon, Andy, Lauren and Casey Siegert; brother of John and Gene Siegert. He was predeceased by his grandson Josh Siegert. Services and interment will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Joshua L. Siegert Memorial Education Scholarship Fund, St. Mary's College of Maryland, 18952 E. Fisher Road, St. Mary's City, MD 20686.
NEWS
January 22, 2006
1648: remarkable Margaret Brent Talk about audacity. On Jan. 21, 1648, Margaret Brent, then 47, appeared before the Maryland General Assembly and requested two votes: one for herself as a landowner and one as Lord Baltimore's attorney. Her request was denied, but she is remembered as a remarkable woman of the 17th century. Brent and other family members came to the Maryland colony empowered with a land grant, hailing from a landed Catholic family in Gloucestershire, England. Her single status was unusual because in Maryland she entered a society in which men outnumbered women about six to one. The governor, Leonard Calvert, did not fare well during a period of religious strife.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2004
NOW OR NEVER Instead of heading "downy ocean" this weekend, why not consider a trip down Southern Maryland? Tomorrow in St. Mary's City, the imaginative and popular River Concert Series, presented by St. Mary's College of Maryland, presents the starry finale of its sixth season of outdoor performances. Jeffrey Silberschlag will conduct the Chesapeake Orchestra in music associated with the heavens, including Gustav Holst's The Planets, Richard Strauss' Also Sprach Zarathustra (forever linked to the film 2001: A Space Odyssey)
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | February 14, 1994
Patty Stoffey scored 31 points, shooting 10 of 15 from the field, leading host Loyola (10-10, 7-2) to an 80-64 victory over Fairfield (12-10, 5-5) in a Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference game yesterday.Stoffey was 11-for-15 from the free-throw line as Loyola took a 43-34 halftime lead. Camille Joyner added 17 points and eight rebounds for Loyola, and Patty Taylor hit all six of her attempts from the field, adding 13 points.Goucher 76, Gallaudet 58WASHINGTON -- Sonya Jones scored 21 points and Di Di Cotton added 16 points and eight rebounds, leading visiting Goucher (12-9, 5-4)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
William Thomas Rowe, a noted artist who established the art department and taught for two decades at St. Mary's College in St. Mary's City, died of complications from a stroke Friday at the home of a daughter in St. Mary's County. He was 81. Mr. Rowe also was known as the "father of men's lacrosse" at St. Mary's -- even though he never played the sport himself. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, Mr. Rowe graduated from Loyola High School in 1941. He enlisted in the Marine Corps and during World War II fought in the South Pacific.
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