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By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
THAT GIRL: SEASON ONE / / Shout! Factory / / $39.98 Before Mary Richards, Murphy Brown or Carrie Bradshaw, there was Ann Marie. And 40 years after her debut on ABC, prime time's first independent woman is back in a delightful time warp of a five-DVD set that takes one straight back to the exuberance, promise and energy of being young in the go-go 1960s. Marlo Thomas stars as the wannabe actress who moves out of her parents' home in Brewster, N.Y., to take up single life in Manhattan -- a move that was revolutionary for a young female character on network TV at the time.
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NEWS
July 16, 2006
On Thursday, July 13th, 2006, KELLY DAWN RICHARDS, beloved daughter of Dawn Bailey and Dennis Richards, Sr.; loving mother of Keira Parks; adored sister of Dennis Richards, Jr., and Carrie Richards; her loving fiance Chris Parks; cherished granddaughter to Betty Calvert and Mary Richards; step-daughter to David Bailey; she is also survived by her 7 aunts, 6 uncles, 2 nieces Jasmine and Valarie, and her nephew Brian. Visitation for family and friends will be held on Tuesday, July 18th, 2006 from 3-5:00 PM and 7-9:00 PM in HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4107 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland, where Funeral Services will be held on Wednesday, July 19th, 2006 at 11:00 AM in the funeral home.
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NEWS
July 16, 2006
On Thursday, July 13th, 2006, KELLY DAWN RICHARDS, beloved daughter of Dawn Bailey and Dennis Richards, Sr.; loving mother of Keira Parks; adored sister of Dennis Richards, Jr., and Carrie Richards; her loving fiance Chris Parks; cherished granddaughter to Betty Calvert and Mary Richards; step-daughter to David Bailey; she is also survived by her 7 aunts, 6 uncles, 2 nieces Jasmine and Valarie, and her nephew Brian. Visitation for family and friends will be held on Tuesday, July 18th, 2006 from 3-5:00 PM and 7-9:00 PM in HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4107 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland, where Funeral Services will be held on Wednesday, July 19th, 2006 at 11:00 AM in the funeral home.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
THAT GIRL: SEASON ONE / / Shout! Factory / / $39.98 Before Mary Richards, Murphy Brown or Carrie Bradshaw, there was Ann Marie. And 40 years after her debut on ABC, prime time's first independent woman is back in a delightful time warp of a five-DVD set that takes one straight back to the exuberance, promise and energy of being young in the go-go 1960s. Marlo Thomas stars as the wannabe actress who moves out of her parents' home in Brewster, N.Y., to take up single life in Manhattan -- a move that was revolutionary for a young female character on network TV at the time.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 2, 2004
In the spring of 1977, as The Mary Tyler Moore Show was about to end its extraordinary seven-year run on CBS, its leading lady was suffering mightily. "I could feel the separation anxiety welling up daily," Mary Tyler Moore wrote in her 1995 autobiography, After All. "I had spent more of my waking hours with the people on this show than I did my real family. ... The years that loomed ahead in my vision without the show seemed cold and gray and threatening. I would have to come to terms with what my abilities were.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2005
SEX AND THE CITY: THE COMPLETE SERIES -- HBO -- Home Video / $299.95 After the successful release of every season of this series, one might ask whether there is any real need for a $300 package combining all six seasons in one collection. The answer is yes. Sex and the City was such a beloved, liberating and delightful series that some fans can't let it go - and want a way to treasure it. This lushly packaged and nicely accessorized (with special features - much like Carrie's outfits) collection is just the ticket for those who think of Sex more as a guide to life than a TV show.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 17, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- One could turn the world on with her smile. The other could turn the most embarrassing moment into a punch line full of belly laughs. Mary Richards and Rhoda Morgenstern were network television's prime-time response to changing attitudes of and toward women in the 1960s and '70s. While the term television icon is now applied to almost anyone who lasts more than six weeks in a prime-time series, Mary really is one: a media template for the single career woman defined by who she is rather than the man with whom she keeps company.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 26, 1992
It has become a bittersweet ritual of spring. Every year, the end of the TV season means the final episode of a long-running show and fans saying goodbye forever to favorite characters.Every few years, though, the experience becomes deeper and often downright painful, as fans say goodbye to landmark shows and characters they have connected with in profound ways.In the 1970s, there was Mary Richards turning out the lights in the newsroom at WJM-TV in Minneapolis, and the Stivics going off to California, leaving Edith and Archie behind.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 7, 2000
The movie is not that great, but it does feel good to see Mary and Rhoda again and get a chance to spend some time with them after all these years. That's the nicest thing I can say about "Mary and Rhoda," the ABC made-for-TV movie tonight that brings back Mary Richards (Mary Tyler Moore) and Rhoda Morgenstern (Valerie Harper) from "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," one of the most beloved and important sitcoms in television history. Mary deserves respect. While the term television icon is now applied to almost anyone who lasts more than six weeks in a prime-time series, Mary really is one: a media template for the single career woman defined by who she is rather than the man with whom she keeps company.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 4, 2003
Mary Richards, Diane Chambers and Chandler Bing would be aghast. For more than three decades, young television characters have been striking out on their own and finding their adult identities at work or with friends. But this season, TV characters in the their 20s and 30s - some with degrees, a few with jobs, most without - are doing an about-face on the road to adulthood and heading back home to live with - or live off the largesse of - mom and dad. The phenomenon is so common in real life that sociologists have a way to describe it: "Boomerang Generation."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2005
SEX AND THE CITY: THE COMPLETE SERIES -- HBO -- Home Video / $299.95 After the successful release of every season of this series, one might ask whether there is any real need for a $300 package combining all six seasons in one collection. The answer is yes. Sex and the City was such a beloved, liberating and delightful series that some fans can't let it go - and want a way to treasure it. This lushly packaged and nicely accessorized (with special features - much like Carrie's outfits) collection is just the ticket for those who think of Sex more as a guide to life than a TV show.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 2, 2004
In the spring of 1977, as The Mary Tyler Moore Show was about to end its extraordinary seven-year run on CBS, its leading lady was suffering mightily. "I could feel the separation anxiety welling up daily," Mary Tyler Moore wrote in her 1995 autobiography, After All. "I had spent more of my waking hours with the people on this show than I did my real family. ... The years that loomed ahead in my vision without the show seemed cold and gray and threatening. I would have to come to terms with what my abilities were.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 13, 2004
June may be the month of brides, but this is the month of television finales. Even as fans continue to debate the merits of last week's final episode of NBC's Friends, now comes the last episode of NBC's Frasier, one of television's most celebrated sitcoms. (Next week the prime-time runs of WB's Angel and ABC's The Practice also will end.) For Kelsey Grammer, executive producer and star of Frasier, which won 31 Emmys in 11 seasons, the goal of tonight's finale is "to leave everybody in a place where they are hopeful, where there is something to look forward to."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 4, 2003
Mary Richards, Diane Chambers and Chandler Bing would be aghast. For more than three decades, young television characters have been striking out on their own and finding their adult identities at work or with friends. But this season, TV characters in the their 20s and 30s - some with degrees, a few with jobs, most without - are doing an about-face on the road to adulthood and heading back home to live with - or live off the largesse of - mom and dad. The phenomenon is so common in real life that sociologists have a way to describe it: "Boomerang Generation."
NEWS
By Kimberly Wilson and Kimberly Wilson,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2002
Sister Mary Richard Cozzens, R.S.M., a longtime teacher and former principal at St. Bernard's Parochial School in Waverly, died Tuesday of natural causes. She was 101. Born two days shy of President William McKinley's re-election in 1900 and given the name Grace Harrington Cozzens, she was raised in Washington, along with 10 brothers and sisters. Her father, Richard Elsworth Cozzens, was born in 1861, the year the Civil War began; his wife, Mary Ellen Brady, was born in 1865, the year it ended.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and By David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 28, 2002
In 1969, Jim Brooks and Allan Burns, two of Hollywood's most talented young television writers, had an idea for a new sitcom about a single woman working at a television station in Minneapolis. The writers met with CBS executives in New York to present the concept for what would become The Mary Tyler Moore Show. Central to the series was the fact that Moore would play the young, divorced Mary Richards -- the first divorced female character in television history. The executives loved the concept until they heard the word "divorced."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and By David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 28, 2002
In 1969, Jim Brooks and Allan Burns, two of Hollywood's most talented young television writers, had an idea for a new sitcom about a single woman working at a television station in Minneapolis. The writers met with CBS executives in New York to present the concept for what would become The Mary Tyler Moore Show. Central to the series was the fact that Moore would play the young, divorced Mary Richards -- the first divorced female character in television history. The executives loved the concept until they heard the word "divorced."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 13, 2004
June may be the month of brides, but this is the month of television finales. Even as fans continue to debate the merits of last week's final episode of NBC's Friends, now comes the last episode of NBC's Frasier, one of television's most celebrated sitcoms. (Next week the prime-time runs of WB's Angel and ABC's The Practice also will end.) For Kelsey Grammer, executive producer and star of Frasier, which won 31 Emmys in 11 seasons, the goal of tonight's finale is "to leave everybody in a place where they are hopeful, where there is something to look forward to."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 7, 2000
The movie is not that great, but it does feel good to see Mary and Rhoda again and get a chance to spend some time with them after all these years. That's the nicest thing I can say about "Mary and Rhoda," the ABC made-for-TV movie tonight that brings back Mary Richards (Mary Tyler Moore) and Rhoda Morgenstern (Valerie Harper) from "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," one of the most beloved and important sitcoms in television history. Mary deserves respect. While the term television icon is now applied to almost anyone who lasts more than six weeks in a prime-time series, Mary really is one: a media template for the single career woman defined by who she is rather than the man with whom she keeps company.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 17, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- One could turn the world on with her smile. The other could turn the most embarrassing moment into a punch line full of belly laughs. Mary Richards and Rhoda Morgenstern were network television's prime-time response to changing attitudes of and toward women in the 1960s and '70s. While the term television icon is now applied to almost anyone who lasts more than six weeks in a prime-time series, Mary really is one: a media template for the single career woman defined by who she is rather than the man with whom she keeps company.
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