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Mary Poppins

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
Actor Gavin Lee might be the first actor ever to tap-dance upside-down across the ceiling in real time. Lee is the likable, gravity-defying performer who for the past six years has performed as Bert the chimney sweep in Cameron Mackintosh's blockbuster stage version of " Mary Poppins." The national touring production of "Poppins" has just blown into the Kennedy Center (presumably on the east wind), where it will remain through Aug. 22. Lee originated the role in London in 2004, stayed with the character when the show transferred to Broadway, and now is portraying the Cockney charmer during the tour.
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NEWS
August 2, 2013
The annual Literary Spelling Bee at the Harford County Farm Fair was filled with excitement for spellers and readers alike. Hosted by Harford County Public Library, 40 participants from children through adult competed in this year's event July 28. Children enjoyed spelling words like "swan" from "The Ugly Duckling" and "chimney" from "Mary Poppins. " Adults were challenged with words like "pachyderms" and "connoisseur. " All participants were given a Farm Fair ribbon and small prize from the library.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2010
Impervious to cynicism and layered with critic-retardants, "Mary Poppins" has plopped into the Kennedy Center Opera House for a nice long stay that should keep the box office humming. The musical, a Disney/Cameron Mackintosh presentation that boasts the theatrical bells and whistles expected from those forces, might not fully satisfy folks devoted to, and expecting a copy of, the popular 1964 movie that inspired it. Devotees of the children's book series by P.L. Travers that started it all might find a nit or two to pick as well.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: RISIBLE Perhaps, like Uncle Albert in Mary Poppins , you love to laugh. If so, you would be marked by risibility , an inclination to laughter, or possessed of risibility, a sense of the amusing. The adjective risible  (pronounced RIZ-uh-buhl) can mean inclined to laugh or causing laughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Next season at the Hippodrome Theatre , a character in an iconic outfit will fly off the stage and into the house, soaring high above wide-eyed spectators. The chances of a mishap during this show-stopping feat are just about nil, however, since we're not talking about the guy who is supposed to zip effortlessly through the air in that unlucky monolith of a musical called "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. " Baltimore audiences will see instead a primly dressed woman with an umbrella over one arm — the famed governess who takes charge of children and adults alike in the well-traveled Broadway revival of "Mary Poppins.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: RISIBLE Perhaps, like Uncle Albert in Mary Poppins , you love to laugh. If so, you would be marked by risibility , an inclination to laughter, or possessed of risibility, a sense of the amusing. The adjective risible  (pronounced RIZ-uh-buhl) can mean inclined to laugh or causing laughter.
NEWS
August 2, 2013
The annual Literary Spelling Bee at the Harford County Farm Fair was filled with excitement for spellers and readers alike. Hosted by Harford County Public Library, 40 participants from children through adult competed in this year's event July 28. Children enjoyed spelling words like "swan" from "The Ugly Duckling" and "chimney" from "Mary Poppins. " Adults were challenged with words like "pachyderms" and "connoisseur. " All participants were given a Farm Fair ribbon and small prize from the library.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | April 25, 2002
She travels by umbrella, is fond of exceptionally long words and knows that a spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down. She's Mary Poppins, magical nanny extraordinaire. And this weekend and next weekend, you can catch Pumpkin Theatre's presentation of the musical comedy Mary Poppins at the Hannah More Arts Center in Stevenson. Baltimore playwright David Rawlings Brown adapted the classic P.L. Travers Mary Poppins stories for this musical presentation. Nancy Parrish Asendorf stars as the title character.
NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | March 8, 1994
"Mary Poppins On Ice" is the Columbia Figure Skating Club's 20th Spring Ice Extravaganza, and performances are scheduled March 26 at 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; and March 27 at 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.The club's performances sell out early so stop at the Columbia Ice Rink, at the Oakland Mills Shopping Center, as soon as possible. The price is right at $8 for adults and $6 for children.Information: (410) 730-0322 or (410) 730-3760.*Results are in for the first phase of the "Perfect Attendance" competition at Stevens Forest Elementary School.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | March 25, 1994
For those who love to watch ice skating -- but hate the stress of competitions -- the Columbia Figure Skating Club has entertainment without the judges."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Next season at the Hippodrome Theatre , a character in an iconic outfit will fly off the stage and into the house, soaring high above wide-eyed spectators. The chances of a mishap during this show-stopping feat are just about nil, however, since we're not talking about the guy who is supposed to zip effortlessly through the air in that unlucky monolith of a musical called "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. " Baltimore audiences will see instead a primly dressed woman with an umbrella over one arm — the famed governess who takes charge of children and adults alike in the well-traveled Broadway revival of "Mary Poppins.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2010
Impervious to cynicism and layered with critic-retardants, "Mary Poppins" has plopped into the Kennedy Center Opera House for a nice long stay that should keep the box office humming. The musical, a Disney/Cameron Mackintosh presentation that boasts the theatrical bells and whistles expected from those forces, might not fully satisfy folks devoted to, and expecting a copy of, the popular 1964 movie that inspired it. Devotees of the children's book series by P.L. Travers that started it all might find a nit or two to pick as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
Actor Gavin Lee might be the first actor ever to tap-dance upside-down across the ceiling in real time. Lee is the likable, gravity-defying performer who for the past six years has performed as Bert the chimney sweep in Cameron Mackintosh's blockbuster stage version of " Mary Poppins." The national touring production of "Poppins" has just blown into the Kennedy Center (presumably on the east wind), where it will remain through Aug. 22. Lee originated the role in London in 2004, stayed with the character when the show transferred to Broadway, and now is portraying the Cockney charmer during the tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | April 25, 2002
She travels by umbrella, is fond of exceptionally long words and knows that a spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down. She's Mary Poppins, magical nanny extraordinaire. And this weekend and next weekend, you can catch Pumpkin Theatre's presentation of the musical comedy Mary Poppins at the Hannah More Arts Center in Stevenson. Baltimore playwright David Rawlings Brown adapted the classic P.L. Travers Mary Poppins stories for this musical presentation. Nancy Parrish Asendorf stars as the title character.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | March 25, 1994
For those who love to watch ice skating -- but hate the stress of competitions -- the Columbia Figure Skating Club has entertainment without the judges."
NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | March 8, 1994
"Mary Poppins On Ice" is the Columbia Figure Skating Club's 20th Spring Ice Extravaganza, and performances are scheduled March 26 at 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; and March 27 at 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.The club's performances sell out early so stop at the Columbia Ice Rink, at the Oakland Mills Shopping Center, as soon as possible. The price is right at $8 for adults and $6 for children.Information: (410) 730-0322 or (410) 730-3760.*Results are in for the first phase of the "Perfect Attendance" competition at Stevens Forest Elementary School.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | December 9, 1990
Meet Bart Stephen.He's a 23-year-old Baltimore mortgage company employee who wants to go back to school to earn a degree in occupational therapy.In the meantime, he wants to be a nanny.That's right, he says: a nanny. "I enjoy children. I've worked at the YMCA for the past couple of summers, and since I'm going back to school, it would fit into my schedule. And being a nanny would suit my temperament."Besides, his 22-year-old brother, Matt Stephen, is a live-in nanny for a family of five in northern Howard County -- and is enjoying it immensely.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing theater critic | October 10, 1990
"Stage mother" is a term that has become negative and pejorative as a result of the popularity of the stage and film versions of the musical comedy "Gypsy."In this story, Mama Rose guides the show biz careers of her daughters, Louise and Baby June, in a fashion not unlike a marine drill sergeant. The sisters have no desire to follow the orders, but Rose's tactics and tone leave them no choice. The rest of this story is history."Stage mother" is also the term deplored by Finksburg's Joan Eichhorn, the mother of two sisters intent on becoming members of the theatrical profession.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | December 9, 1990
Meet Bart Stephen.He's a 23-year-old Baltimore mortgage company employee who wants to go back to school to earn a degree in occupational therapy.In the meantime, he wants to be a nanny.That's right, he says: a nanny. "I enjoy children. I've worked at the YMCA for the past couple of summers, and since I'm going back to school, it would fit into my schedule. And being a nanny would suit my temperament."Besides, his 22-year-old brother, Matt Stephen, is a live-in nanny for a family of five in northern Howard County -- and is enjoying it immensely.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing theater critic | October 10, 1990
"Stage mother" is a term that has become negative and pejorative as a result of the popularity of the stage and film versions of the musical comedy "Gypsy."In this story, Mama Rose guides the show biz careers of her daughters, Louise and Baby June, in a fashion not unlike a marine drill sergeant. The sisters have no desire to follow the orders, but Rose's tactics and tone leave them no choice. The rest of this story is history."Stage mother" is also the term deplored by Finksburg's Joan Eichhorn, the mother of two sisters intent on becoming members of the theatrical profession.
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