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Mary Pickford

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By Chris Kaltenbach | August 27, 2000
Milestone Film & Video, a New Jersey-based distribution company that specializes in rescuing films from undeserved obscurity (one of their releases this year was a restored, French-language version of Marcel Ophuls' 1970 documentary, "The Sorrow and the Pity") continues to do right by the legacy of Mary Pickford. "Mary Pickford: A Life On Film," a 1999 documentary written by Rita Mae Brown and narrated by Whoopi Goldberg, offers a comprehensive look at the life and career of the native Canadian who, along with D.W. Griffith and Charlie Chaplin, was one of the three most influential figures of the silent cinema.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 27, 2000
Milestone Film & Video, a New Jersey-based distribution company that specializes in rescuing films from undeserved obscurity (one of their releases this year was a restored, French-language version of Marcel Ophuls' 1970 documentary, "The Sorrow and the Pity") continues to do right by the legacy of Mary Pickford. "Mary Pickford: A Life On Film," a 1999 documentary written by Rita Mae Brown and narrated by Whoopi Goldberg, offers a comprehensive look at the life and career of the native Canadian who, along with D.W. Griffith and Charlie Chaplin, was one of the three most influential figures of the silent cinema.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1999
She's America's Forgotten Sweetheart, a neglected figure from the early days of cinema whose movies are rarely seen, whose artistry is often dismissed as sheer popularity, whose reputation has been eclipsed by two men once viewed as her equals.It's about time Mary Pickford emerged from the shadows -- even if those shadows were largely of her own making. In her later years, Pickford didn't seem to give a lick what happened to her films, among the most loved movies of their time.Fortunately, the hole Pickford dug for her legacy is beginning to disappear.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2000
Most audiences know Douglas Fairbanks Jr. only as the suave 1930s movie star with chiseled good looks and pencil-thin mustache, dressed in elegantly cut double-breasted Savile Row lounge suits, rather than his career during World War II as a U.S. Navy officer who commanded two British gunboats during the invasion of southern France in 1944. Fairbanks, who died earlier this month, was born into Hollywood royalty as the son of the legendary swashbuckler, Douglas Fairbanks Sr., who thrilled silent screen audiences with his heroic roles and dashing good looks.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
As the American Film Institute's recently released Top 100 list showed, there's plenty of competition when it comes to naming the greatest American movie ever. And it's a sure bet that competition for the title of greatest actor, actress or director would be just as fierce.But when it comes to the greatest year for American films, there's no disputing the champion - 1939 was such a banner year for Hollywood ("Gone With the Wind," "The Wizard of Oz," "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," "Intermezzo," "The Women," "Gunga Din," "Stagecoach," "Ninotchka," "Destry Rides Again," "Wuthering Heights")
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2000
Most audiences know Douglas Fairbanks Jr. only as the suave 1930s movie star with chiseled good looks and pencil-thin mustache, dressed in elegantly cut double-breasted Savile Row lounge suits, rather than his career during World War II as a U.S. Navy officer who commanded two British gunboats during the invasion of southern France in 1944. Fairbanks, who died earlier this month, was born into Hollywood royalty as the son of the legendary swashbuckler, Douglas Fairbanks Sr., who thrilled silent screen audiences with his heroic roles and dashing good looks.
NEWS
March 19, 2009
COY WATSON JR., 96 Child actor became a news photographer Coy Watson Jr., who appeared in Mack Sennett comedies and other silent films before abandoning acting for a long career as a newspaper and television news photographer, died Saturday near San Diego of complications from stomach cancer. He recounted in his memoir, The Keystone Kid, how Mr. Sennett once blew up his family's porch for a scene in a "Keystone Kops" film, then rebuilt it for them, adding a new kitchen and bedroom. In addition to Keystone Kops movies, Mr. Watson appeared in films of such stars as Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle, Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. His last film was 1930's Puttin' on the Ritz.
NEWS
April 23, 1999
Charles "Buddy" Rogers, 94, an actor and bandleader who was star of the first film to win the best-picture Oscar and husband of screen legend Mary Pickford, died Wednesday in Rancho Mirage, Calif. He starred in "Wings," which took Hollywood's top honor at the first Academy Awards ceremony in May 1929.Mary Clark Rockefeller, 91, a prominent figure in the education of nurses and the former first lady of New York state, died Wednesday in New York. Mrs. Rockefeller married Nelson A. Rockefeller in 1930.
NEWS
March 31, 1995
Booten Herndon, 79, an author and free-lance writer, died Wednesday in Charlottesville, Va., after a long illness. He wrote dozens of books and thousands of articles. Among his works were "Ford: An Unconventional Biography of the Men and Their Times," "Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks," "The Seventh Day," "Rickenbacker," "Over the Hump," and "Young Men Can Change the World."Carl Jefferson, 75, a Grammy-winning music producer who founded the Concord Jazz Festival in 1969, died Wednesday of liver cancer in Concord, Calif.
NEWS
September 23, 1990
John E. Moran, 67, a child film actor in the 1930s, died Thursday of cancer in Greenfield, Mass. He was discovered by the late Mary Pickford and appeared in several Hollywood films, including the 1938 version of "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" and "Destination Moon," a 1939 Buck Rogers serial.Stephen F. Kolzak, 37, who supervised casting for the Emmy-winning television comedy "Cheers," died Wednesday of AIDS in Los Angeles. He was senior vice president of casting and talent at Columbia Pictures Television until illness forced him to resign in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1999
She's America's Forgotten Sweetheart, a neglected figure from the early days of cinema whose movies are rarely seen, whose artistry is often dismissed as sheer popularity, whose reputation has been eclipsed by two men once viewed as her equals.It's about time Mary Pickford emerged from the shadows -- even if those shadows were largely of her own making. In her later years, Pickford didn't seem to give a lick what happened to her films, among the most loved movies of their time.Fortunately, the hole Pickford dug for her legacy is beginning to disappear.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
As the American Film Institute's recently released Top 100 list showed, there's plenty of competition when it comes to naming the greatest American movie ever. And it's a sure bet that competition for the title of greatest actor, actress or director would be just as fierce.But when it comes to the greatest year for American films, there's no disputing the champion - 1939 was such a banner year for Hollywood ("Gone With the Wind," "The Wizard of Oz," "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," "Intermezzo," "The Women," "Gunga Din," "Stagecoach," "Ninotchka," "Destry Rides Again," "Wuthering Heights")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Lidard | October 21, 2004
Barbie through the ages Barbie, the multifaceted and successful 11.5-inch woman, is being scrutinized Tuesday by Kristina Milnor in "Barbie as Grecian Goddess and Egyptian Queen: Women's History by Mattel," presented by the Library of Congress. Milnor, a professor at Barnard College, discusses the "Great Eras Collection" that Mattel released from 1993 to 1997. She uses illustrated examples to dissect Mattel's marketing strategy and representation of women in the past in a series that was packaged as an educational tool for adult collectors.
NEWS
March 2, 1993
Actress Lillian Gish, who died Saturday at age 99, enjoyed a movie career that spanned nearly the entire history of the motion picture industry. She first appeared before the camera in 1909, at the age of 16, in a short film by the pioneering American director D.W. Griffith. Her last movie performance, as an indomitable old woman in "The Whales of August," came in 1987, when she co-starred with another screen legend, Bette Davis.Ms. Gish, whose family lived briefly in Baltimore during the 1890s, was only 5 when she made her acting debut.
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