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NEWS
April 14, 1995
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke stepped up criticism of his political rival, City Council President Mary Pat Clarke, over her failure to file updated campaign finance reports. She dismissed the issue as a "red herring." Page 3B.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
City Councilman William "Pete" Welch is calling for a large tax break for urban farmers in Baltimore. In legislation he plans to introduce Thursday, Welch is seeking a 90 percent break on property taxes for an urban farmer who grows and sells at least $5,000 of fruit and vegetables in a year. Welch said he hopes the legislation will help eliminate the city's so-called food deserts in which some neighborhoods have no access to healthy food nearby.  "We have a disparity in access to fresh fruit and vegetables," Welch said.  Such legislation was last tried three years ago by City Council members Mary Pat Clarke and Warren Branch, but it was opposed by the mayor's office who argued it would set a bad precedent for an already cash-strapped city.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 14, 1995
The two people most relieved at the primary result are Kurt L. Schmoke and Mary Pat Clarke. Now he can stay mayor and she doesn't have to be. The moral: Never doubt Larry Gibson's sagacity again. The organization that would be needed to carry Maryland for Bill and Al next year is alive and well. The stopgap spending bill is more gap than stop.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Baltimore's food truck industry will be able to petition Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration for additional places to sell their fares, under a bill approved Monday by the City Council. The legislation calls on the Department of General Services to create new "food truck zones," while also allowing the mobile vendors to operate on streets throughout the city as long as they adhere to meter restrictions, said Babila Lima, a special assistant who is guiding the process for the city.
NEWS
June 28, 2012
The Baltimore City Council still has time at its July 16 meeting to put the mandatory audit of city agencies on the ballot. As for how to afford this mandate, we ill never know until regular audits demystify where the money is and how it's being spent. Council approval of this mandate would lay a foundation for less guesswork and more transparency in the city's budget deliberations next year and in subsequent years. Mary Pat Clarke, Baltimore The writer, a Democrat, represents the 14 t h District on the Baltimore City Council.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1994
It's a more cautious era at Baltimore's Board of Estimates, seven months after Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean slipped a million-dollar deal past her colleagues to lease the former headquarters of her travel agency to the city.Concerned by even the slightest chance of impropriety after the comptroller's indictment on theft and misconduct charges, City Solicitor Neal M. Janey yesterday asked that the board delay voting on two items involving the spouses of the mayor and council president.
NEWS
By VERA P. HALL | September 6, 1995
Eight years ago, I won a seat on the Baltimore City Council along with a host of other new faces. There was a new mayor, Kurt L. Schmoke, and a new president of the City Council, Mary Pat Clarke.The 1989 elections were a watershed in Baltimore. That election marked the beginning of a new spirit in Baltimore politics.That new spirit quickly evaporated in an adversarial confrontation between Mary Pat Clarke and some members of the council. That acrimony split the council and, in many ways, we have never recovered.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
City Councilman William "Pete" Welch is calling for a large tax break for urban farmers in Baltimore. In legislation he plans to introduce Thursday, Welch is seeking a 90 percent break on property taxes for an urban farmer who grows and sells at least $5,000 of fruit and vegetables in a year. Welch said he hopes the legislation will help eliminate the city's so-called food deserts in which some neighborhoods have no access to healthy food nearby.  "We have a disparity in access to fresh fruit and vegetables," Welch said.  Such legislation was last tried three years ago by City Council members Mary Pat Clarke and Warren Branch, but it was opposed by the mayor's office who argued it would set a bad precedent for an already cash-strapped city.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Baltimore's food truck industry will be able to petition Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration for additional places to sell their fares, under a bill approved Monday by the City Council. The legislation calls on the Department of General Services to create new "food truck zones," while also allowing the mobile vendors to operate on streets throughout the city as long as they adhere to meter restrictions, said Babila Lima, a special assistant who is guiding the process for the city.
NEWS
June 14, 2010
The protesters gathered at City Hall are indeed justified in fearing that the plan of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to merge the Commission on Aging and Retirement Education, a charter commission of volunteer members, into the Health Department will reduce services, especially to active seniors, as well as to frail and disabled persons, of this major city. As one who not only advocated for senior citizens as a Republican member of the General Assembly in the 1950s and as a member of CARE for approximately 14 years (a substantial portion of which as its chairman)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
The Rawlings-Blake administration's efforts to slash Baltimore's long-term deficit has run into a bump - more than $100 million in new police, education and other expenses now expected over the next decade. The school system is billing the city for more students than expected - at a cost of several million dollars a year. The enrollment figures are wrong, school and city officials agree, but under state law, the city still has to pay a bill that could come to $43 million. Settlements of lawsuits against the Police Department and increased landfill costs are among other expenses that were not anticipated in the fiscal plan.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Confronted with a bloody start to 2014, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will keep police curfew centers open longer, offer larger rewards for gun crime tips and implement a full-scale "Operation Ceasefire" program in Baltimore - a strategy that's been successful in other cities. The mayor plans to focus the majority of Monday afternoon's State of the City speech on what her administration is doing to address the violence. Homicides are up by 80 percent in 2014 compared with last year, though total violent crime is down by 29 percent.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
The City Council is considering delaying a controversial new tax on taxi, limousine and other livery services in Baltimore that business owners said they refuse to pay. Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke said she will introduce a bill today that would delay by 180 days the implementation of the 25-cents per passenger excise tax on cabs, limousines and for-hire sedans, which went into effect Oct. 1 but is not due to start being collected until Nov. 25....
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Heather Mizeur picked up her first endorsement from a Baltimore elected official Monday as veteran City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke gave her blessing to the Montgomery County delegate's insurgent campaign. Clarke, a longtime fixture in Baltimore politics, hailed Mizeur as an "exciting choice" in a 2014 gubernatorial race that also includes the better-known Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler. A onetime candidate for mayor, Clarke first served on the City Council in 1975 and was its president from 1987 to 1995.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2013
A city councilwoman is challenging Baltimore's plan to charge businesses some of the highest stormwater fees in the state - and divert some of the money that had gone to Chesapeake Bay cleanup to help fund property tax cuts. Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke says the Rawlings-Blake administration's stormwater plan would create a financial hardship for many local businesses. And Clarke and environmental groups object to raising revenue intended for pollution abatement to help pay for property tax relief.
NEWS
June 28, 2012
The Baltimore City Council still has time at its July 16 meeting to put the mandatory audit of city agencies on the ballot. As for how to afford this mandate, we ill never know until regular audits demystify where the money is and how it's being spent. Council approval of this mandate would lay a foundation for less guesswork and more transparency in the city's budget deliberations next year and in subsequent years. Mary Pat Clarke, Baltimore The writer, a Democrat, represents the 14 t h District on the Baltimore City Council.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2010
Baltimore voters will decide in November whether to allow city officials to make more purchases without a public announcement. Under the charter amendment, which was approved by a 9-6 vote of the City Council on Monday evening, expenses less than $25,000 would no longer require approval from the Board of Estimates. Currently, all expenditures greater than $5,000 require spending board approval. The measure, which was introduced at the request of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, would also change the threshold at which city contracts would have to be advertised.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | December 13, 1994
On a blustery January day, just after Baltimore's homicide rate soared to a new record, a young city councilman called for the police commissioner to resign if the escalating violence did not end.Yesterday, almost two years after he became widely known for his crusade against crime, Councilman Lawrence A. Bell III announced his candidacy for council president.He delivered a tough speech on the need to "rescue our young and old from the pervasive fear of being victimized by crime." The 4th District councilman cited his legislative efforts to combat crime and promised to "continue this challenge to make Baltimore a safe community."
NEWS
June 19, 2012
J. Michael Collins and Roz Heid's critical letters on Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke's Monday statement regarding the bottle tax demand a response ("Clarke finally doing something for schools? Not really" and "Baltimore needs more than a new tax," June 12 and 13). No elected official in the state has done more for remedying the crisis of the city's decrepit school buildings than Mary Pat Clarke. When the school system suffered its 2004 fiscal crisis, renovation money to prepare Waverly School for its first 7th grade class was withdrawn.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 21, 2011
William Ferdinand Eberhart Jr., a retired McCormick spice official and city neighborhoods activist who championed urban stream valley parks, died of cancer Tuesday at his Tuscany-Canterbury home. He was 72. Born and raised in West Baltimore's Franklintown neighborhood on Crescent Street, Mr. Eberhart was a 1956 Polytechnic Institute graduate and earned an English degree at Lehigh University. He joined the Army and was trained in Russian at its language school in Monterey, Calif. He was assigned to Bonn, Germany, during the Cold War and retired as a lieutenant colonel in the Army Reserves.
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