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Mary Matalin

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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 2002
DETROIT - Mary Matalin is running late, which explains why she's doing an interview in her underwear. In the cramped ladies' room at a small airstrip here, she is up to her usual multitasking - promoting President Bush's agenda, plotting how to get her children to the family's farm in Virginia and, in the middle of it all, unzipping her Day-Glo yellow pantsuit so it won't wrinkle as she flies between Republican campaign engagements. "You don't mind coming to the bathroom with me so I can change my clothes?"
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 23, 2006
WASHINGTON --The capital is filled with Republicans convinced that they will lose the House and maybe the Senate. So last week, the White House and party leaders convened a "friends and allies" teleconference to dispute what Ken Mehlman, chairman of the Republican National Committee, considers flawed conventional wisdom. For 20 minutes, Mehlman and the White House political director, Sara Taylor, tried to lift the cloak of gloom that has descended on the top ranks of Republican strategists, using what one of the dozens of lobbyists, donors, party aides and other supporters who listened in later called "happy talk."
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FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | August 6, 1992
To the list of love affairs that had tragic endings -- Romeo and Juliet, Tristram and Isolde, Cathy and Heathcliff, Deborah Norville and the "Today Show," Ling-Ling and Hsing-Hsing -- you may now add the names of Mick and Jerry.I refer, of course, to those two crazy, fun kids: Mick "I can't get no satisfaction" Jagger and Jerry "I just wanna be your No. 1 girl" Hall.The word on the street is that Mick and Jerry are Splitsville. Of course, some people say that while this development is tres sad, it does not strike them as tres tragic.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | May 21, 2006
Pity poor Joe. It is his first baseball season, and his mother's a sportswriter." That's how I began one of the first essays I ever wrote about my family life. It seems like a million years ago now. All this time later, this column should begin: "Pity poor Joe. He's a Marine and his mother is an aging hippie." My son graduates this week from the U.S. Naval Academy, and he has elected to join the U.S. Marine Corps. I am filled with an odd mix of pride and dread, but for the moment I am concentrating on having a good time.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | August 4, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Richard Nixon, who will go down in the history books for reasons other than his manner of campaigning, nevertheless will be remembered by students of politics as the master of sleaze by indirection.That is not to say that he didn't sling mud directly at his Democratic foes throughout his long career, but his talent for sneaky sleaze was unsurpassed. He would often begin a negative comment about somebody by observing that "there are those who say" such-and-such about him or her, and then quickly add, "I do not say that."
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Finally, some fun. Finally, in a presidential race that has had all the excitement of back-to-back reruns of "The Lawrence Welk Show," someone is firing up the dialogue.Right now, for instance, Republican partisan and radio talk show host Mary Matalin is offering her analysis of President Clinton. Let's tune in:"Bill Clinton's the worst human being I've ever seen," says Matalin, who was George Bush's deputy campaign manager in 1992 and now is an ardent volunteer in Bob Dole's presidential campaign.
NEWS
By TOM BAXTER | October 24, 1991
Shreveport, Louisana -- It would be comforting to think that the people who voted for David Duke Saturday were an illiterate pack of yahoos. Do not be comforted.It was ''nice'' people who put the former klansman into the runoff for governor in Louisiana: the kind of people who drive late-model cars, own lake cabins and send their kids to college; the kind of people who brag about what their mamas and daddies taught them. Not everyone who voted for Mr. Duke was comfortably middle class, but it was those folks who gave him a margin of more than 70,000 votes over Buddy Roemer, the yuppified incumbent Republican.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 23, 2006
WASHINGTON --The capital is filled with Republicans convinced that they will lose the House and maybe the Senate. So last week, the White House and party leaders convened a "friends and allies" teleconference to dispute what Ken Mehlman, chairman of the Republican National Committee, considers flawed conventional wisdom. For 20 minutes, Mehlman and the White House political director, Sara Taylor, tried to lift the cloak of gloom that has descended on the top ranks of Republican strategists, using what one of the dozens of lobbyists, donors, party aides and other supporters who listened in later called "happy talk."
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | May 21, 2006
Pity poor Joe. It is his first baseball season, and his mother's a sportswriter." That's how I began one of the first essays I ever wrote about my family life. It seems like a million years ago now. All this time later, this column should begin: "Pity poor Joe. He's a Marine and his mother is an aging hippie." My son graduates this week from the U.S. Naval Academy, and he has elected to join the U.S. Marine Corps. I am filled with an odd mix of pride and dread, but for the moment I am concentrating on having a good time.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In a minute, you will learn all about how Al Franken chose the title for his new book on modern American politics. But first: a word or two about the titles he rejected. "I probably should have called it were too confrontational."Instead, satirist Al Franken, best known for his appearances on "Saturday Night Live," settled on a kinder, gentler title: "Rush Limbaugh Is a Big Fat Idiot and Other Observations."Leaning back into the sofa in his posh suite at the Jefferson Hotel, Mr. Franken -- who describes himself as a "mushball liberal Democrat" -- explains the compelling reasons for choosing such a title.
TRAVEL
By Kathy McCabe and Kathy McCabe,Special to the Sun | November 16, 2003
The future of Iraq, Arnold's California win, who will get the Democratic nomination in 2004 -- all are topics of conversation in the nation's capital right now. But what Washington is really talking about these days is HBO's K Street, the weekly television series featuring real Washington power players (mixing it up with actors) and the places where they get deals done. If you haven't seen the show, tonight is your chance to catch the season finale (at 9 p.m.; HBO says it expects to air reruns)
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 2002
DETROIT - Mary Matalin is running late, which explains why she's doing an interview in her underwear. In the cramped ladies' room at a small airstrip here, she is up to her usual multitasking - promoting President Bush's agenda, plotting how to get her children to the family's farm in Virginia and, in the middle of it all, unzipping her Day-Glo yellow pantsuit so it won't wrinkle as she flies between Republican campaign engagements. "You don't mind coming to the bathroom with me so I can change my clothes?"
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Finally, some fun. Finally, in a presidential race that has had all the excitement of back-to-back reruns of "The Lawrence Welk Show," someone is firing up the dialogue.Right now, for instance, Republican partisan and radio talk show host Mary Matalin is offering her analysis of President Clinton. Let's tune in:"Bill Clinton's the worst human being I've ever seen," says Matalin, who was George Bush's deputy campaign manager in 1992 and now is an ardent volunteer in Bob Dole's presidential campaign.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In a minute, you will learn all about how Al Franken chose the title for his new book on modern American politics. But first: a word or two about the titles he rejected. "I probably should have called it were too confrontational."Instead, satirist Al Franken, best known for his appearances on "Saturday Night Live," settled on a kinder, gentler title: "Rush Limbaugh Is a Big Fat Idiot and Other Observations."Leaning back into the sofa in his posh suite at the Jefferson Hotel, Mr. Franken -- who describes himself as a "mushball liberal Democrat" -- explains the compelling reasons for choosing such a title.
FEATURES
By Ed Bark and Ed Bark,Dallas Morning News | July 11, 1993
Day 146 of "The Raw Deal" dawned with Rush Limbaugh stating the obvious about his hit half-hour of liberal-bashing. "You're watching one of the hottest shows in America," he said, referring to "Rush Limbaugh: The Television Show."Mr. Limbaugh, whose "Raw Deal" reference is to the Clinton administration, is proving himself right in more ways than one. His colorful conservatism, proclaimed daily on television and his No. 1-rated radio show, has helped trigger boom times for commentators taking cues from President Clinton's perceived miscues.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | August 6, 1992
To the list of love affairs that had tragic endings -- Romeo and Juliet, Tristram and Isolde, Cathy and Heathcliff, Deborah Norville and the "Today Show," Ling-Ling and Hsing-Hsing -- you may now add the names of Mick and Jerry.I refer, of course, to those two crazy, fun kids: Mick "I can't get no satisfaction" Jagger and Jerry "I just wanna be your No. 1 girl" Hall.The word on the street is that Mick and Jerry are Splitsville. Of course, some people say that while this development is tres sad, it does not strike them as tres tragic.
TRAVEL
By Kathy McCabe and Kathy McCabe,Special to the Sun | November 16, 2003
The future of Iraq, Arnold's California win, who will get the Democratic nomination in 2004 -- all are topics of conversation in the nation's capital right now. But what Washington is really talking about these days is HBO's K Street, the weekly television series featuring real Washington power players (mixing it up with actors) and the places where they get deals done. If you haven't seen the show, tonight is your chance to catch the season finale (at 9 p.m.; HBO says it expects to air reruns)
FEATURES
By Ed Bark and Ed Bark,Dallas Morning News | July 11, 1993
Day 146 of "The Raw Deal" dawned with Rush Limbaugh stating the obvious about his hit half-hour of liberal-bashing. "You're watching one of the hottest shows in America," he said, referring to "Rush Limbaugh: The Television Show."Mr. Limbaugh, whose "Raw Deal" reference is to the Clinton administration, is proving himself right in more ways than one. His colorful conservatism, proclaimed daily on television and his No. 1-rated radio show, has helped trigger boom times for commentators taking cues from President Clinton's perceived miscues.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | August 4, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Richard Nixon, who will go down in the history books for reasons other than his manner of campaigning, nevertheless will be remembered by students of politics as the master of sleaze by indirection.That is not to say that he didn't sling mud directly at his Democratic foes throughout his long career, but his talent for sneaky sleaze was unsurpassed. He would often begin a negative comment about somebody by observing that "there are those who say" such-and-such about him or her, and then quickly add, "I do not say that."
NEWS
By TOM BAXTER | October 24, 1991
Shreveport, Louisana -- It would be comforting to think that the people who voted for David Duke Saturday were an illiterate pack of yahoos. Do not be comforted.It was ''nice'' people who put the former klansman into the runoff for governor in Louisiana: the kind of people who drive late-model cars, own lake cabins and send their kids to college; the kind of people who brag about what their mamas and daddies taught them. Not everyone who voted for Mr. Duke was comfortably middle class, but it was those folks who gave him a margin of more than 70,000 votes over Buddy Roemer, the yuppified incumbent Republican.
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