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Mary Lou Retton

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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | August 14, 1995
Mary Lou Retton seems happy and excited to be at the Columbia Mall standing next to the blowup photograph of chicken parts. But you know Mary Lou.She'd be happy and excited at an autopsy. So perky and effervescent that she could make a living at it. Wait a minute, she is making a living at it.She steps out onto the red, white and blue stage and displays The Smile, the one her promotional material describes as 100-watt. Funny, the Los Angeles Times said 1,000-watt. Either way, the crowd of about 400 people has turned out on a Sunday afternoon to watch her smile, cook chicken and talk about chicken.
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January 24, 2008
91 Ernest Borgnine Actor 67 Neil Diamond Singer 67 Aaron Neville Singer 40 Mary Lou Retton Gymnast 22 Mischa Barton Actress
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 17, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - When you're 14, it's hard to be a symbol of perfection in an imperfect world. But that's what happened in 1976, in Montreal, to Nadia Comaneci. One moment, she was just another stony-faced tumbler from Romania. And in the next, in the blink of a perfect 10 on a scoreboard, she became a star, who owned the Olympics and commanded a chunk of the world's sporting interest. "I didn't feel any pressure because nobody was expecting me to win," she said the other day, nearly a quarter-century after she first commanded the public stage.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2004
Mary Lou Retton is antsy. The trademark million-watt smile snaps off as if controlled by an invisible switch. She is giving orders. "No, not five minutes, three. And we'll walk," she says to a reporter seeking an interview. "No, I'm not going in there. I've seen it," she says to a temporary assistant who is trying to get her into a quiet, air-conditioned room at Baltimore's Gerstung Center, away from the noise of a hundred rambunctious gymnastics campers and the humidity of a summer day. "Where's my car?
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2004
Mary Lou Retton is antsy. The trademark million-watt smile snaps off as if controlled by an invisible switch. She is giving orders. "No, not five minutes, three. And we'll walk," she says to a reporter seeking an interview. "No, I'm not going in there. I've seen it," she says to a temporary assistant who is trying to get her into a quiet, air-conditioned room at Baltimore's Gerstung Center, away from the noise of a hundred rambunctious gymnastics campers and the humidity of a summer day. "Where's my car?
FEATURES
January 24, 2008
91 Ernest Borgnine Actor 67 Neil Diamond Singer 67 Aaron Neville Singer 40 Mary Lou Retton Gymnast 22 Mischa Barton Actress
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1996
ATLANTA -- They were separated by several hundred feet, not to mention a dozen years, but brought together by a flood of memories. It wasn't Pauley Pavilion. It wasn't the 1984 Olympics. And it wasn't a silver medal in a watered-down competition.It was better.Much better.For Mary Lou Retton, the star of the 1984 U.S. team that launched its sport into the American consciousness, it was the thrill of seeing another team do collectively what she had done individually in Los Angeles: win a gold medal.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | June 12, 1992
It's your daughter. And your call.She is a tiny thing, who, given a set of uneven parallel bars, takes flight. And dance? My God. She's 10 and she dances and prances and tumbles and looks, to your eyes, just like the kids you see on TV up on the platform with the medal hanging from their necks, except maybe even better.And now there's someone at the door who says he can make your daughter a star, an Olympian, a Mary Lou Retton.All you have to do is this:* Send her to Houston for, say, the next five years.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | March 4, 1992
Mary Lou Retton has been a household word for years now, and she's still only 24.The kid from West Virginia who bounced into our consciousness in 1984 to become the first American woman to win an Olympic gold medal in gymnastics now sells fitness for the president of the United States. She tries to motivate others with a "take-risks" talk that she delivers dozens of times a year to adults and youngsters and is, of course, still "the Revco girl.""I'm lucky that I've made the transition" from Olympic gymnast to salesperson extraordinaire, she said while in Baltimore yesterday to kick off ticket sales for the U.S. Olympic Gymnastics Trials, to be held here in June.
SPORTS
June 18, 1995
* The Detroit Tigers (right) win 35 of their first 40 games and take the World Series in five games.* Tigers reliever Willie Hernandez wins the American League MVP and Cy Young awards.* Pete Rose collects his 4,000th career hit, while in a Montreal Expos uniform on April 13, and then returns to Cincinnati in August as player-manager.* Peter Ueberroth, who served as president of the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee, becomes the new commissioner on Oct. 1.* Geraldine Ferraro becomes first woman to run for a national office on a major political party ticket.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 17, 2000
SYDNEY, Australia - When you're 14, it's hard to be a symbol of perfection in an imperfect world. But that's what happened in 1976, in Montreal, to Nadia Comaneci. One moment, she was just another stony-faced tumbler from Romania. And in the next, in the blink of a perfect 10 on a scoreboard, she became a star, who owned the Olympics and commanded a chunk of the world's sporting interest. "I didn't feel any pressure because nobody was expecting me to win," she said the other day, nearly a quarter-century after she first commanded the public stage.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1996
ATLANTA -- They were separated by several hundred feet, not to mention a dozen years, but brought together by a flood of memories. It wasn't Pauley Pavilion. It wasn't the 1984 Olympics. And it wasn't a silver medal in a watered-down competition.It was better.Much better.For Mary Lou Retton, the star of the 1984 U.S. team that launched its sport into the American consciousness, it was the thrill of seeing another team do collectively what she had done individually in Los Angeles: win a gold medal.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | August 14, 1995
Mary Lou Retton seems happy and excited to be at the Columbia Mall standing next to the blowup photograph of chicken parts. But you know Mary Lou.She'd be happy and excited at an autopsy. So perky and effervescent that she could make a living at it. Wait a minute, she is making a living at it.She steps out onto the red, white and blue stage and displays The Smile, the one her promotional material describes as 100-watt. Funny, the Los Angeles Times said 1,000-watt. Either way, the crowd of about 400 people has turned out on a Sunday afternoon to watch her smile, cook chicken and talk about chicken.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | June 12, 1992
It's your daughter. And your call.She is a tiny thing, who, given a set of uneven parallel bars, takes flight. And dance? My God. She's 10 and she dances and prances and tumbles and looks, to your eyes, just like the kids you see on TV up on the platform with the medal hanging from their necks, except maybe even better.And now there's someone at the door who says he can make your daughter a star, an Olympian, a Mary Lou Retton.All you have to do is this:* Send her to Houston for, say, the next five years.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | March 4, 1992
Mary Lou Retton has been a household word for years now, and she's still only 24.The kid from West Virginia who bounced into our consciousness in 1984 to become the first American woman to win an Olympic gold medal in gymnastics now sells fitness for the president of the United States. She tries to motivate others with a "take-risks" talk that she delivers dozens of times a year to adults and youngsters and is, of course, still "the Revco girl.""I'm lucky that I've made the transition" from Olympic gymnast to salesperson extraordinaire, she said while in Baltimore yesterday to kick off ticket sales for the U.S. Olympic Gymnastics Trials, to be held here in June.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | August 7, 1992
HAZARDOUS TO YOUR HEALTH? -- Recent study by New England Journal of Medicine indicates repeated viewing of dopey McDonald's crab cake sandwich commercial, featuring annoying mute franchise manager mugging in sunglasses, causes cancer in laboratory animals.DREAM TEAM UPDATE -- Dreamers squeaked by Lithuania 522-15. Game was delayed briefly when all five American starters remained on bench scanning fine print of their Olympic agreements for additional endorsement opportunities. Resident head case Charles Barkley, finally gagged and placed in straitjacket by coach Chuck Daly, was held to 18 points.
SPORTS
October 12, 2008
1 Payoff time: The $390,000 winner's purse is at stake today in the final round of the Constellation Energy Senior Players Championship at Baltimore Country Club (4 p.m., ch. 11). First tee is 8:30 a.m. 2 'I shook up the world': It's Cassius Clay's last fight, sort of. He meets champ Sonny Liston in 1964 (1 p.m., ESPN Classic). The next day, Clay said he was changing his name to Muhammad Ali. 3 Raising awareness: Figure skaters, gymnasts and musical performers look to raise awareness of women's cancers in the two-hour "Frosted Pink With a Twist" (4 p.m., Ch. 2)
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