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By Katherine A. Powers and Katherine A. Powers,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 1996
"The Shadow Man," by Mary Gordon. Random House. 272 pages. $24.How odd to think that memoirs, especially memoirs of the father, were once the province of old duffers, faded ladies and of the mildewed great. Diligently written in leisure, indefatigably distributed, those were prosy, costive volumes of righteous adulation, peevishness and rheumy maunderings.The memoir of today is a different, stronger cup of tea: poured out hot with passion and laced with salt tears, vitriol and gall.These are the works of writers in the first flush of their powers or, as in the case of Mary Gordon, in their prime.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 12, 2005
On October 9, 2005, RAYMOND JAY GORDON; beloved husband of Alice Jean Gordon (nee Kamber); beloved father of Joel Evans Gordon, of Masontown, WV; devoted father-in-law of Sharon Gordon; devoted brother of the late Joseph and Sara Gordon, Nellie and Emanuel Rankin, Esther "Kitty" and William Solomon, Milton and Mary Gordon, Yale and Peggy Gordon, Dorothy and Joseph Belber; loving grandfather of Emily Nichole, Benjamin Yale and Evan Jay Gordon and Leira...
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NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | August 15, 1993
THE REST OF LIFE: THREE NOVELLAS Mary Gordon Viking257 pages. $2 "One of the greatest treasures a novelist can have is a secret world, which he or she can open up to his or her reader," observed Mary Gordon in a recent book of essays, "Good Boys and Dead Girls." In "The Rest of Life: Three Novellas," Ms. Gordon explores the secret, amorous lives of three women -- two middle-aged and one elderly -- as they reflect on the present and past and wonder about the future.The most beautiful and profound of these novellas is "Immaculate Man," narrated by the unnamed director of a New York shelter for abused women and divorced mother of two children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2005
Pearl By Mary Gordon. Pantheon. 368 pages. $24.95. It was in Carol Shields' remarkable novel, Unless, that readers encountered a character named Norah, who, at the age of 20, drops out of college one day to sit on a grimy street corner with a sign that reads "Goodness" about her neck. Shields' novel asks where an impulse like that one comes from, forcing readers to think hard about how society, culture, and upbringing are or are not implicated in such a mystifying act. Bewildering brands of personal politics can wreak havoc.
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | April 21, 1991
GOOD BOYS AND DEAD GIRLS.Mary Gordon.Viking.253 pages. $19.95.From her first novel, "Final Payments," to her most recennovel, "The Other Side," Mary Gordon has established herself as an observant chronicler of Irish-American Catholic culture. In her fiction she describes the insularity of this immigrant culture -- its conservatism, its suspicion of outsiders, its sexual prudery and its fundamental insecurity. She sees Irish blarney as a defense by which the talker seeks to conceal his inner life behind a witty, bitingly humorous garrulity.
NEWS
October 12, 2005
On October 9, 2005, RAYMOND JAY GORDON; beloved husband of Alice Jean Gordon (nee Kamber); beloved father of Joel Evans Gordon, of Masontown, WV; devoted father-in-law of Sharon Gordon; devoted brother of the late Joseph and Sara Gordon, Nellie and Emanuel Rankin, Esther "Kitty" and William Solomon, Milton and Mary Gordon, Yale and Peggy Gordon, Dorothy and Joseph Belber; loving grandfather of Emily Nichole, Benjamin Yale and Evan Jay Gordon and Leira...
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 17, 1995
New York -- In the novels and short stories of Mary Gordon, memory and reality shift and flicker like shadows in candlelight. Her characters discover that memory records both the real and the imagined and may be ever-changing. Ms. Gordon -- author of six books of fiction and one of essays -- has seen that same flickering in her own life.A few years ago, she began writing a biography of her father, of whom she had many fond recollections. He was born Jewish, converted to Catholicism and died when his daughter was only 7. But as Mary Gordon delved into his past, she discovered that many of the most important things he had said, and many of the most important things she had believed, were false.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2005
Pearl By Mary Gordon. Pantheon. 368 pages. $24.95. It was in Carol Shields' remarkable novel, Unless, that readers encountered a character named Norah, who, at the age of 20, drops out of college one day to sit on a grimy street corner with a sign that reads "Goodness" about her neck. Shields' novel asks where an impulse like that one comes from, forcing readers to think hard about how society, culture, and upbringing are or are not implicated in such a mystifying act. Bewildering brands of personal politics can wreak havoc.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | March 30, 1994
Mary Gordon has written about the family from the time of her critically acclaimed first novel, "Final Payments," in 1978.That book was about the tortured relationship between a young woman and her ill father. In a steady stream of novels, novellas and short stories produced since, she has written about several other family relationships, from a variety of perspectives.And now she's writing "Reading My Father," a nonfiction work about her father, who died when Ms. Gordon was 7. Delving into her own family, she is finding, is more difficult than she had imagined.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1999
From uptown to down, when Mary Jo Gordon thinks "arts community," she thinks globally. She was recently elected vice president of the board of the Fells Point Creative Alliance and runs Gallerie Francoise et ses freres in Greenspring Station. "Part of what a good art gallery does is involve the entire community with the arts," she says.When Gordon thinks fashion, she thinks in clean simple lines, and well tailored, finely textured clothes. The chances are good that Gordon, 53, will wear her usual, simple uniform at this Sunday's "Homicide Live!
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1999
From uptown to down, when Mary Jo Gordon thinks "arts community," she thinks globally. She was recently elected vice president of the board of the Fells Point Creative Alliance and runs Gallerie Francoise et ses freres in Greenspring Station. "Part of what a good art gallery does is involve the entire community with the arts," she says.When Gordon thinks fashion, she thinks in clean simple lines, and well tailored, finely textured clothes. The chances are good that Gordon, 53, will wear her usual, simple uniform at this Sunday's "Homicide Live!
NEWS
By Katherine A. Powers and Katherine A. Powers,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 1996
"The Shadow Man," by Mary Gordon. Random House. 272 pages. $24.How odd to think that memoirs, especially memoirs of the father, were once the province of old duffers, faded ladies and of the mildewed great. Diligently written in leisure, indefatigably distributed, those were prosy, costive volumes of righteous adulation, peevishness and rheumy maunderings.The memoir of today is a different, stronger cup of tea: poured out hot with passion and laced with salt tears, vitriol and gall.These are the works of writers in the first flush of their powers or, as in the case of Mary Gordon, in their prime.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 17, 1995
New York -- In the novels and short stories of Mary Gordon, memory and reality shift and flicker like shadows in candlelight. Her characters discover that memory records both the real and the imagined and may be ever-changing. Ms. Gordon -- author of six books of fiction and one of essays -- has seen that same flickering in her own life.A few years ago, she began writing a biography of her father, of whom she had many fond recollections. He was born Jewish, converted to Catholicism and died when his daughter was only 7. But as Mary Gordon delved into his past, she discovered that many of the most important things he had said, and many of the most important things she had believed, were false.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | March 30, 1994
Mary Gordon has written about the family from the time of her critically acclaimed first novel, "Final Payments," in 1978.That book was about the tortured relationship between a young woman and her ill father. In a steady stream of novels, novellas and short stories produced since, she has written about several other family relationships, from a variety of perspectives.And now she's writing "Reading My Father," a nonfiction work about her father, who died when Ms. Gordon was 7. Delving into her own family, she is finding, is more difficult than she had imagined.
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | August 15, 1993
THE REST OF LIFE: THREE NOVELLAS Mary Gordon Viking257 pages. $2 "One of the greatest treasures a novelist can have is a secret world, which he or she can open up to his or her reader," observed Mary Gordon in a recent book of essays, "Good Boys and Dead Girls." In "The Rest of Life: Three Novellas," Ms. Gordon explores the secret, amorous lives of three women -- two middle-aged and one elderly -- as they reflect on the present and past and wonder about the future.The most beautiful and profound of these novellas is "Immaculate Man," narrated by the unnamed director of a New York shelter for abused women and divorced mother of two children.
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | April 21, 1991
GOOD BOYS AND DEAD GIRLS.Mary Gordon.Viking.253 pages. $19.95.From her first novel, "Final Payments," to her most recennovel, "The Other Side," Mary Gordon has established herself as an observant chronicler of Irish-American Catholic culture. In her fiction she describes the insularity of this immigrant culture -- its conservatism, its suspicion of outsiders, its sexual prudery and its fundamental insecurity. She sees Irish blarney as a defense by which the talker seeks to conceal his inner life behind a witty, bitingly humorous garrulity.
NEWS
July 7, 2005
On June 17, 2005, SUSAN L. KRUCHKO (nee Clendaniel) beloved mother of Jennifer K. Palestrant and her husband Chris; loving grandmother of William Palestrant; dear sister of Chip Clendaniel, Mary Gordon Clendaniel, Cindy Rutkowski and Andy Clendaniel; former wife of John Kruchko. Also survived by numerous beloved friends and relatives. A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at the Lady Chapel of the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen on Saturday at 11 A.M. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to the National Headache Foundation, 820 N. Orleans, Suite 217, Chicago, IL, 60610-3132.
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