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Mary Carter Smith

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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
In Africa, griot means storyteller. In Baltimore, it means Mary Carter Smith. The city's official griot -- who recently marked her 80th birthday -- is on the air, encouraging a boy 67 years her junior to read a poem. It is about another eccentric city by the water, San Francisco: But I was young and dreamful. Dreams were the best of me. And I, to San Francisco, Came dreaming from the sea. The poem was part of a broadcast of Smith's weekly Saturday radio show on WEAA-FM (88.9)
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NEWS
April 27, 2007
Funeral plans were announced yesterday for Mary Carter Smith, the Baltimore folklorist and storyteller who died Tuesday at age 88. A wake will be held from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday at Huber Memorial United Church of Christ, 5701 York Road. A family hour will begin there at 10 a.m. Monday, followed by funeral services.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 16, 2006
She's known as "Mother Griot" or "Mother Mary," and for most of her 87 years, Mary Carter Smith, a professional storyteller, has been entertaining children and adults with tales she has collected from Africa, Ireland and the Appalachians. "Actually it's a French word that is pronounced gree-oh rather than gree-ott," said the retired schoolteacher and librarian the other day, who was named Baltimore's griot in 1983, and state griot in 1991. Born in Birmingham, Ala., she was raised in Youngstown, Ohio, and Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTERS | April 26, 2007
To storyteller Mary Carter Smith, there was a oneness of all races. "We are one family," she often told her audiences, "and a family has a good time when we come together." Called a folklorist, entertainer and the Mother Griot, the former Baltimore schoolteacher and librarian became nationally known as she helped popularize traditional African stories, dress and songs to American audiences and students after visiting Ghana nearly 40 years ago. Ms. Smith, who was 88, died of renal failure Tuesday at the Genesis Eldercare Cromwell nursing home in Towson.
NEWS
April 27, 2007
Funeral plans were announced yesterday for Mary Carter Smith, the Baltimore folklorist and storyteller who died Tuesday at age 88. A wake will be held from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday at Huber Memorial United Church of Christ, 5701 York Road. A family hour will begin there at 10 a.m. Monday, followed by funeral services.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTERS | April 26, 2007
To storyteller Mary Carter Smith, there was a oneness of all races. "We are one family," she often told her audiences, "and a family has a good time when we come together." Called a folklorist, entertainer and the Mother Griot, the former Baltimore schoolteacher and librarian became nationally known as she helped popularize traditional African stories, dress and songs to American audiences and students after visiting Ghana nearly 40 years ago. Ms. Smith, who was 88, died of renal failure Tuesday at the Genesis Eldercare Cromwell nursing home in Towson.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1995
Mary Carter Smith is a renowned Baltimore storyteller with a tale to tell. This time, though, it's not someone else's story, but her own. And it is as much a revelation as the many stories she spins for her audiences in her deep, commanding voice.Almost from the beginning, Mrs. Smith's life was marked by loss. She was 5 and living with her grandmother in Youngstown, Ohio, when her mother, Eartha, was shot to death by her stepfather in New York City. Her mother was 22.They brought her body home to Youngstown for the burial.
NEWS
April 29, 2007
On Tuesday, April 24, 2007, MARY CARTER SMITH, Griot of Maryland internationally renowned storyteller, historian, author, radio personality and beloved family elder, ended her journey here on earth. One of her major goals in life was to perpetuate the art of storytelling from generation to generation. Her love for children and all people pervaded her life's work of storytelling, writing, singing, dancing, laughing and praying. She is survived by her cousins Joan S. Stevenson, Douglas G. Stevenson and other cousins, relatives and friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | January 2, 2000
Kwanzaa was welcomed at the Great Blacks in Wax Museum with a show of umoja, or unity, one of the seven guiding principles the African-American holiday celebrates. The museum was packed with 250 guests and performers to celebrate the first of seven days of Kwanzaa. The evening's program also was packed -- with entertainment -- including a performance by the Golden Rockettes Senior Citizen Dancers, which event coordinator Liz Byrd said "stole the show." Among the friends and families in the audience: Dr. Joanne Martin, museum executive director; Deborah Pierce-Fakunle, museum board member, and her son David, 12; the Rev. Michael John Baylor, museum curator; Gene Stinnette, museum construction designer; Minister Kamau Kenyatta, Baltimore City school social worker; Antonio Wilkens, MCI sales representative; three generations of the Hickman family, from grandmother Maebelle to Shontrell Schumper, 5; Miriam Charles, postal worker, with grandchildren Isiah, 5, and Cynnamon, 7; and Mary Carter Smith, Baltimore area griot.
NEWS
March 28, 1998
THE BALTIMORE CITY Commission for Women today will induct five new members into its Women's Hall of Fame.They are:Bertha "Betty" Albornoz, the co-founder of Friends of the Colombian Child, an organization that aids children's institutions her native Colombia.Sister Helen Amos, chief executive officer of Mercy Medical Center.Doris Brightful, a retired community health nurse active incommunity and religious organizations.Dr. Flossie McClain Dedmon, for 32 years a teacher, administrator and dean at Coppin State College.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 16, 2006
She's known as "Mother Griot" or "Mother Mary," and for most of her 87 years, Mary Carter Smith, a professional storyteller, has been entertaining children and adults with tales she has collected from Africa, Ireland and the Appalachians. "Actually it's a French word that is pronounced gree-oh rather than gree-ott," said the retired schoolteacher and librarian the other day, who was named Baltimore's griot in 1983, and state griot in 1991. Born in Birmingham, Ala., she was raised in Youngstown, Ohio, and Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
In Africa, griot means storyteller. In Baltimore, it means Mary Carter Smith. The city's official griot -- who recently marked her 80th birthday -- is on the air, encouraging a boy 67 years her junior to read a poem. It is about another eccentric city by the water, San Francisco: But I was young and dreamful. Dreams were the best of me. And I, to San Francisco, Came dreaming from the sea. The poem was part of a broadcast of Smith's weekly Saturday radio show on WEAA-FM (88.9)
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1995
Mary Carter Smith is a renowned Baltimore storyteller with a tale to tell. This time, though, it's not someone else's story, but her own. And it is as much a revelation as the many stories she spins for her audiences in her deep, commanding voice.Almost from the beginning, Mrs. Smith's life was marked by loss. She was 5 and living with her grandmother in Youngstown, Ohio, when her mother, Eartha, was shot to death by her stepfather in New York City. Her mother was 22.They brought her body home to Youngstown for the burial.
FEATURES
November 7, 1992
The Tenth National Festival of Black Storytelling will be held Wednesday through Sunday at the Radisson Plaza Lord Baltimore Hotel, co-sponsored by the Griots' Circle of Maryland and the National Association of Black Storytellers.The festival -- this year's theme is "Still Talking that Talk" -- will workshops, storytelling, a "liars contest" and tours of African-American historical sites.The festival includes a storytelling concert and awards ceremony at 8 p.m. Friday at Morgan State University's Murphy Fine Arts Center.
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