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Mary Bo

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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2001
She was born on a blustery night in a Carroll County barn, a healthy foal with spidery legs and a white dollar sign emblazoned on her forehead. Outside, the wind whistled like a trifecta winner. How Mary Bo Quoit has grown. Five years later, the mare is a mainstay at Maryland racetracks, a blue-collar thoroughbred who is earning her keep. Having struggled early on, the horse, whose career has been chronicled in The Sun, has found her niche, running in cheap claiming races at Laurel and Pimlico.
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2002
Miss Piggy is grazing for two. The horse, who raced as Mary Bo Quoit but is better known by her nickname, is three months pregnant. She's awaiting the pitter-patter of little hooves, which, her owners hope, will one day run faster than most. Her racing days done, Miss Piggy wiles away the summer heat in a barn cooled by electric fans; nights, she frisks under the stars in a verdant pasture with several other mothers-to-be. It's a mare-ternity ward for thoroughbreds - quite a change for the 6-year-old, whose life has been chronicled in The Sun. "She's `working' these days.
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2000
Her trainer found the filly lying in her stall, thrashing in distress. Her legs jackhammered against the cinder block wall; her head flailed recklessly about. The pain in the horse's belly felt like a predator clawing at her gut, and she was desperate to flee. The trainer suspected Mary Bo Quoit had colic, the No. 1 killer of horses. It was half past noon on Monday. Acting swiftly was a matter of life and death for the 4-year-old Carroll County thoroughbred, nicknamed Miss Piggy, whose life is being chronicled in The Sun. Trainer and part-owner Joanne Hughes slipped a rope around the animal's neck and eased her away from the wall at the Bowie Training Center in Prince George's County.
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2002
The horse known as "Miss Piggy" has swapped the race course for the mommy track. Spring is breeding season at thoroughbred farms throughout Maryland, a time when more than 1,500 broodmares are matched up with stallions for a roll in the hay. One of those being led to the halter is Mary Bo Quoit, a 6-year-old whose life has been chronicled in The Sun. The horse, nicknamed "Miss Piggy," could have been at the track, where she won several claiming races....
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1997
Miss Piggy will never win a race. But Mary Bo Quoit might.Same horse.Miss Piggy, the Carroll County yearling whose progress is being chronicled in The Sun, has swapped her barnyard moniker for a permanent name -- the one she would take to the track.Call her Mary Bo Quoit now. The name is a marriage of pedigree: Her dam is Mary Bo Peep; her sire, Waquoit.The filly's name, one of more than 500 submitted by Sun readers, is simple and straightforward -- the way her Baltimore owner hopes she'll run."
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1997
She is willful, headstrong and prone to petulance -- a teen-ager in equine years.Mary Bo Quoit is growing up.At 18 months, the frisky filly is feeling her oats, bossing her playmates and bedeviling her owners at Liberty Run Farm in Carroll County. Like many teens, Mary Bo Quoit is also changing her appearance, the latest milestone for the Maryland thoroughbred, one of 1,500 foaled in the state last year. Her journey from birth to racetrack is being chronicled in The Sun.Born a bay, Mary Bo Quoit is turning gray, a change triggered by bloodline.
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1997
At breakfast, she received an extra carrot, a pat on the head and a birthday card from a couple of fans.Mary Bo Quoit turned 1 today.Otherwise, the filly, whose life is being chronicled in The Sun, was to pass the day like any other: several buckets of oats and a romp in the rolling pasture at Liberty Run Farm in Carroll County.There is not much ado in the lives of yearlings bound for the track. Training starts at age 2. Languid spring days are spent grazing in the field, dozing in the sun. Milestones are rare.
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1998
During her first month at the track, Mary Bo Quoit was kicked bloody in the shin, spooked by a motorcycle gang and nearly trampled by a pack of thundering thoroughbreds.Tough sport, horse racing.The hubbub has not scarred Mary Bo Quoit, the 2-year-old whose life is being chronicled in The Sun. The steel-gray filly breezes through her workouts at the Bowie Training Center in Prince George's County, unfazed by the ruckus."Some horses get real timid when stuff happens on the track. They never forget," said JoAnne Hughes, her trainer.
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
Snorting impatiently, the filly nudges her empty feed bucket until it clangs against the farm fence like a dinner bell. Mary Bo Quoit has been feeling her oats; now, it's time to eat them.A young colt sidles over for supper, brushing against his pen pal. Mary Bo Quoit does not like this. She pins her ears, then nips his flank. The colt, which outweighs her by 200 pounds, retreats and waits his turn.Mary Bo Quoit wins again -- another barnyard victory for the 2-year-old thoroughbred, whose life is being chronicled in The Sun.Brassy and bossy, Mary Bo (nee Miss Piggy)
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2002
The horse known as "Miss Piggy" has swapped the race course for the mommy track. Spring is breeding season at thoroughbred farms throughout Maryland, a time when more than 1,500 broodmares are matched up with stallions for a roll in the hay. One of those being led to the halter is Mary Bo Quoit, a 6-year-old whose life has been chronicled in The Sun. The horse, nicknamed "Miss Piggy," could have been at the track, where she won several claiming races....
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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 23, 2001
The 5-year-old gray mare isn't what she used to be. She's a winner. With three triumphs in her past seven starts, Mary Bo Quoit is finally validating her bloodlines. Yesterday, in the first race at Pimlico, the Carroll County thoroughbred claimed her second straight victory. Nicknamed "Miss Piggy," the horse led all the way in a field of six and won by a neck over favored Dance Fancy in a modest 1:13 4/5. "She broke like a shot, got tired at the end and just dug in," said Joanne Hughes, trainer and part-owner of Mary Bo Quoit.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2001
She was born on a blustery night in a Carroll County barn, a healthy foal with spidery legs and a white dollar sign emblazoned on her forehead. Outside, the wind whistled like a trifecta winner. How Mary Bo Quoit has grown. Five years later, the mare is a mainstay at Maryland racetracks, a blue-collar thoroughbred who is earning her keep. Having struggled early on, the horse, whose career has been chronicled in The Sun, has found her niche, running in cheap claiming races at Laurel and Pimlico.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2001
Finally, "Miss Piggy" got to ham it up. In the slop. Her nickname fit yesterday as the 5-year-old, known officially as Mary Bo Quoit, won her maiden in the fourth race at Pimlico. Victory meant photographs, peppermints, the winner's circle - the works. It was the 15th career start for the Carroll County mare, whose life has been chronicled in The Sun. Mary Bo Quoit led all the way in the six-furlong race and won by two lengths over Astro Dancer in a dull 1 minute, 15 1/5 seconds. "First time I didn't get dirty on her," said jockey Mario Verge.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2000
Her trainer found the filly lying in her stall, thrashing in distress. Her legs jackhammered against the cinder block wall; her head flailed recklessly about. The pain in the horse's belly felt like a predator clawing at her gut, and she was desperate to flee. The trainer suspected Mary Bo Quoit had colic, the No. 1 killer of horses. It was half past noon on Monday. Acting swiftly was a matter of life and death for the 4-year-old Carroll County thoroughbred, nicknamed Miss Piggy, whose life is being chronicled in The Sun. Trainer and part-owner Joanne Hughes slipped a rope around the animal's neck and eased her away from the wall at the Bowie Training Center in Prince George's County.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
She has swapped her stall at the track for a lush, rolling pasture; a day at the races for a romp in the field; a tubful of feed for the green grass of home. Her career at a crossroads, Mary Bo Quoit is back on the farm. Winless in five starts at Laurel, the roan thoroughbred has retreated to the Carroll County barnyard where she was born. Her handlers say it's a welcome respite for the 4-year-old filly, nicknamed "Miss Piggy," whose racing career is being chronicled in The Sun. They say the horse needs a break to get her head on straight.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | November 28, 1999
When Mary Bo Quoit, the filly otherwise known as Miss Piggy and whose life is being chronicled in The Sun, finished the fourth race of her career yesterday at Laurel Park, her jockey, Mario Verge, was splattered with pasty dirt thrown up by the other horses who passed her."She was just upset and didn't want to run," said Verge, who had been encouraged by Mary Bo Quoit's performance a month ago, when she recovered from a bad stumble and raced to the finish."Today, she didn't try," Verge said.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1996
Head down, ears up, eyes closed, the pregnant broodmare dozes in the midday sun. Mary Bo Peep is asleep on her feet -- no easy task, considering the 90-pound thoroughbred stirring restlessly inside her.Mary Bo Peep doesn't budge. She has given birth many times before, and the warmth feels good on her aging back. Nothing stirs save the unborn foal, kicking at its mother's sides. Her belly dancing, the old mare slumbers on.It's spring and, like 1,500 other thoroughbred broodmares throughout Maryland, Mary Bo Peep awaits the stork.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
She has swapped her stall at the track for a lush, rolling pasture; a day at the races for a romp in the field; a tubful of feed for the green grass of home. Her career at a crossroads, Mary Bo Quoit is back on the farm. Winless in five starts at Laurel, the roan thoroughbred has retreated to the Carroll County barnyard where she was born. Her handlers say it's a welcome respite for the 4-year-old filly, nicknamed "Miss Piggy," whose racing career is being chronicled in The Sun. They say the horse needs a break to get her head on straight.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | October 31, 1999
Mary Bo Quoit, the filly otherwise known as Miss Piggy and whose life is being chronicled in The Sun, ran the third race of her career yesterday.She broke well from the gate in the seventh race before stumbling badly, going nearly to her knees.She dropped to last, but steadied and passed tiring rivals to finish fifth in the eight-horse field.Mary Bo Quoit was 13 3/4 lengths behind Breadknife, who finished first.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1999
The steel-gray filly broke first from the gate, but for the rest of the race there was nary a peep from Mary Bo Quoit.The 3-year-old thoroughbred nicknamed "Miss Piggy" started strong, faded quickly and finished fifth in her debut yesterday at Laurel Park.One of four first-timers in the eight-horse field, Mary Bo Quoit generally held her own with the other novices, finishing ahead of two of them. She was 13 lengths back in the six-furlong race in what was considered a fast time (1 minute, 10 4/5 seconds)
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