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By William Pfaff | December 16, 1996
AMSTERDAM -- The retired University of Chicago historian, William H. McNeill, a Canadian-American, was given the Netherlands' Erasmus Prize last week for his many books on the ''big history'' of humanity. These include ''The Rise of the West'' (1963), ''Plagues and Peoples'' (1976) and ''A History of the Human Condition'' (1986).The award, given at the royal palace in the presence of Queen Beatrix, was an act subversive of the conventional wisdom, since Professor McNeill's work -- precisely because it deals with history in the widest terms -- is regarded by mainstream professional historians as unscientific or even as unserious.
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NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 18, 2007
BEIJING -- A rare open letter signed by 17 former top officials and conservative Marxist scholars before a key Communist Party meeting accuses China's top leaders of steering the country in the wrong direction, pandering to foreigners, betraying the workers' revolution and jeopardizing social stability. "We're going down an evil road," said the letter posted on the Web site Mao Zedong's Flag. "The whole country is at a most precarious time." The challenge is unusual both for the importance of its signatories and for its timing during the time leading up to this fall's Party Congress -- an event held once every five years and a key date on the political calendar.
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NEWS
October 25, 1998
The New York Times said in an editorial Friday:Massimo D'Alema, who heads Italy's former Communist Party, seems likely to win parliamentary confirmation as prime minister, making him the first ex-Communist to lead a major West European country. But Washington, which worked hard during the Cold War to exclude Italian Communists from government, has little to worry about. Mr. D'Alema would lead a coalition that ranges further right than the last Italian government. He is likely to continue the conservative fiscal policies that have sharply reduced Italy's budget deficits and qualified it to join Europe's new single currency.
NEWS
October 25, 1998
The New York Times said in an editorial Friday:Massimo D'Alema, who heads Italy's former Communist Party, seems likely to win parliamentary confirmation as prime minister, making him the first ex-Communist to lead a major West European country. But Washington, which worked hard during the Cold War to exclude Italian Communists from government, has little to worry about. Mr. D'Alema would lead a coalition that ranges further right than the last Italian government. He is likely to continue the conservative fiscal policies that have sharply reduced Italy's budget deficits and qualified it to join Europe's new single currency.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | January 5, 1995
Havre de Grace -- It's a hoot and a half to think that the dim bulbs at the University of Maryland Baltimore County actually declined to grant tenure to an instructor because she wasn't Marxist enough to satisfy their discriminating standards.Why are academics always the last to get the word? Marxism? Get real. Hello, out there in Catonsville -- is anybody home?In their rarefied satellite-campus atmosphere, the intellectual leadership of UMBC evidently didn't notice that Marxism as an operable philosophy has been on the dust heap of history for at least five years, except at certain universities.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | January 4, 1992
Washington -- One of the main reasons communism maintained its grip on so many for so long was, to use the phrase of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the willing suspension of disbelief afforded it by liberal clergy and denominational organizations throughout the world.Few modernists were more evangelical in their zeal for things socialist and communist than Rev. William Sloane Coffin, the former chaplain at Yale University and later the senior minister at Riverside Church in New York.Mr. Coffin believed in a liberation theology whose god was Marxist.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 1998
"Achieving Our Country: Leftist Thought in Twentieth-Century America," by Richard Rorty. 144 pages. Harvard University Press. $18.95.In the American academy, leftism has never been stronger; in the rest of America, it has never been weaker. Thanks in large part to the strategy of "triangulation" devised by Dick Morris and taken up by Bill Clinton, who never saw a fence he didn't want to straddle, the hard-left wing of the Democratic Party has become demoralized to the point of paralysis, and the big-government liberalism that long dominated the party's rhetoric has largely ceased to be politically viable.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | March 29, 1991
London. Namibia, Africa's last colony, attained its independence on March 21, 1990. It nearly happened, but not quite, that the last bastion of communism in Africa was toppled one year later.Expect the fall of Col. Haile Mengistu Mariam any day now. The rebel Eritreans and Tigrayans are approaching the gates of Addis Ababa, and Ethiopia's wantonly barbaric dictator finds himself bereft of all support, both domestic and foreign. The Cubans have gone, and Moscow doesn't want to know. Imperialism is at an end in Africa and so, it appears, is communism.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | April 7, 1996
Sometime in July, call up everybody you know who is genuinely concerned about human liberty and invite them to a 50th birthday party for George Orwell's "Animal Farm."To mark that book's historic first half-century, Harcourt Brace & Co., the original publisher, has produced a special edition, gloriously ornamented with paintings and drawings by Ralph Steadman (180 pages. $26). Or there is a current simple paperback copy available (Signet Classic. 128 pages. $4.95).You know "Animal Farm." It is said to be among the 20 bestsellers in the entire history of publishing.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 7, 1994
TCThe Cold War was said to have ended with the fall of the Berlin wall, but the withdrawal of American, Allied and Russian troops from Berlin marks its real end, removing all foreign forces from Central Europe. President Clinton's speech at the Brandenburg Gate next Tuesday will end a 50-year American engagement in Central Europe that had no precedent, and which, one must surely hope, will require no sequel.The American and Allied units remaining in Germany are no longer there for Cold War reasons but as part of a common effort, in which Germany is a full partner, to institutionalize a new collective security against threats that can only be identified in abstractions: disorder, extremism, nationalism, national breakdown.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 1998
"Achieving Our Country: Leftist Thought in Twentieth-Century America," by Richard Rorty. 144 pages. Harvard University Press. $18.95.In the American academy, leftism has never been stronger; in the rest of America, it has never been weaker. Thanks in large part to the strategy of "triangulation" devised by Dick Morris and taken up by Bill Clinton, who never saw a fence he didn't want to straddle, the hard-left wing of the Democratic Party has become demoralized to the point of paralysis, and the big-government liberalism that long dominated the party's rhetoric has largely ceased to be politically viable.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | December 16, 1996
AMSTERDAM -- The retired University of Chicago historian, William H. McNeill, a Canadian-American, was given the Netherlands' Erasmus Prize last week for his many books on the ''big history'' of humanity. These include ''The Rise of the West'' (1963), ''Plagues and Peoples'' (1976) and ''A History of the Human Condition'' (1986).The award, given at the royal palace in the presence of Queen Beatrix, was an act subversive of the conventional wisdom, since Professor McNeill's work -- precisely because it deals with history in the widest terms -- is regarded by mainstream professional historians as unscientific or even as unserious.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | April 7, 1996
Sometime in July, call up everybody you know who is genuinely concerned about human liberty and invite them to a 50th birthday party for George Orwell's "Animal Farm."To mark that book's historic first half-century, Harcourt Brace & Co., the original publisher, has produced a special edition, gloriously ornamented with paintings and drawings by Ralph Steadman (180 pages. $26). Or there is a current simple paperback copy available (Signet Classic. 128 pages. $4.95).You know "Animal Farm." It is said to be among the 20 bestsellers in the entire history of publishing.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | January 5, 1995
Havre de Grace -- It's a hoot and a half to think that the dim bulbs at the University of Maryland Baltimore County actually declined to grant tenure to an instructor because she wasn't Marxist enough to satisfy their discriminating standards.Why are academics always the last to get the word? Marxism? Get real. Hello, out there in Catonsville -- is anybody home?In their rarefied satellite-campus atmosphere, the intellectual leadership of UMBC evidently didn't notice that Marxism as an operable philosophy has been on the dust heap of history for at least five years, except at certain universities.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 7, 1994
TCThe Cold War was said to have ended with the fall of the Berlin wall, but the withdrawal of American, Allied and Russian troops from Berlin marks its real end, removing all foreign forces from Central Europe. President Clinton's speech at the Brandenburg Gate next Tuesday will end a 50-year American engagement in Central Europe that had no precedent, and which, one must surely hope, will require no sequel.The American and Allied units remaining in Germany are no longer there for Cold War reasons but as part of a common effort, in which Germany is a full partner, to institutionalize a new collective security against threats that can only be identified in abstractions: disorder, extremism, nationalism, national breakdown.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | November 2, 1993
Pope John Paul II, who was one of communism's most passionate adversaries, finds some "good things" in Marxist achievements and "savage" elements in capitalism, according to a rare private interview published in an Italian newspaper yesterday.The pope's remarks led his interviewer, a friend, to exclaim: "Holy Father, I must say with all due humility that when you speak like this, I wonder if you are not more opposed to capitalism than communism."Described as only the second lengthy interview Pope John Paul has granted during his 15-year pontificate, it was published in the Italian newspaper La Stampa and made available in English and Spanish through the New York Times.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | May 30, 1991
Washington-- ONE OF MY favorite historical figures by far is the Emperor Theodore of Ethiopia. He ranks down there, next to Rasputin, the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem and Attila the Hun. A lot of people thought he was mad; we know he was mad.Indeed, in 1868, as he holed up in his Ethiopian Valhalla fortress in the wild mountains of his beautiful country, he took 30 British and Europeans hostage, holding them against the onslaught of an oncoming British invasion...
NEWS
By Jeffrey M. Landaw | January 8, 1991
THE OLD fuddy-duddies in school who wouldn't listen to your demands for relevance were right: The classics are always timely.The most prophetic movie you can find just now isn't ''The War of the Worlds,'' or ''2001,'' or any of the many incarnations of ''Star Trek,'' a cult I could never quite get myself to join. If you want a movie that sums up our situation at home and abroad, take a look at ''Duck Soup.''As that movie begins, Freedonia suffers from paralyzed government and deep budget problems -- sound familiar?
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | January 4, 1992
Washington -- One of the main reasons communism maintained its grip on so many for so long was, to use the phrase of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the willing suspension of disbelief afforded it by liberal clergy and denominational organizations throughout the world.Few modernists were more evangelical in their zeal for things socialist and communist than Rev. William Sloane Coffin, the former chaplain at Yale University and later the senior minister at Riverside Church in New York.Mr. Coffin believed in a liberation theology whose god was Marxist.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | August 6, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- In a world where Communists have lost their ability to strike fear in the hearts of most opponents, South Africa stands out for a lively debate taking place over who is and who is not "a Red."Nelson Mandela's African National Congress is coming under intense criticism because of its longtime alliance with the South African Communist Party and because of the large number of Communists on the policy-making body of the anti-apartheid organization.The furor has reached such fever pitch that Mr. Mandela publicly criticized Marxism last month in his first clear attempt to distance his organization from Communist doctrines and to address white fears that a future ANC-led government would lead South Africa to economic ruin.
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