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By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Since the news broke that baseball union pioneer Marvin Miller passed away this week, there has been a growing media chorus advocating his induction in the National Baseball Hall of Fame. It certainly is long overdue. Miller changed baseball for the better and made a sport full of enemies during the 1960s and '70s. He redistributed the wealth of a generation of stingy baseball owners, who were not forward-thinking enough to see the the avalanche of money that would bury everyone in the game after the reserve clause was overturned.
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By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Since the news broke that baseball union pioneer Marvin Miller passed away this week, there has been a growing media chorus advocating his induction in the National Baseball Hall of Fame. It certainly is long overdue. Miller changed baseball for the better and made a sport full of enemies during the 1960s and '70s. He redistributed the wealth of a generation of stingy baseball owners, who were not forward-thinking enough to see the the avalanche of money that would bury everyone in the game after the reserve clause was overturned.
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SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley | May 20, 2004
Some of the most influential people in sports labor and management will be in town today as the Sports Lawyer Association opens its 30th annual conference at the Hyatt Regency. Nearly 400 are expected to attend - including high-ranking executives from the NFL, Major League Baseball, NHL and NBA - to hear speakers and panel discussions on a variety of legal issues at the three-day meetings. "With all those leagues represented, that's what make it so special," said locally-based agent Tony Agnone, who is serving as the conference's program chairman.
SPORTS
December 8, 2010
Gillick best choice Juan Carlos Rodriguez Sun Sentinel Neither Marvin Miller nor George Steinbrenner was a better choice for the Hall of Fame. Were they as deserving as Pat Gillick? Absolutely. This discussion is not about the merits of Gillick's candidacy as a longtime general manager. His record as one of the game's preeminent team architects is well founded. Why the Veterans Committee did not give Miller or Steinbrenner the necessary votes is the issue.
SPORTS
December 8, 2010
Gillick best choice Juan Carlos Rodriguez Sun Sentinel Neither Marvin Miller nor George Steinbrenner was a better choice for the Hall of Fame. Were they as deserving as Pat Gillick? Absolutely. This discussion is not about the merits of Gillick's candidacy as a longtime general manager. His record as one of the game's preeminent team architects is well founded. Why the Veterans Committee did not give Miller or Steinbrenner the necessary votes is the issue.
NEWS
August 9, 2001
Sister Mary Augustine, 85, worked at hospitals Sister Mary Augustine, who worked in medical institutions run by the Sisters of Bon Secours, died Monday of heart failure at Marian Hall in Marriottsville. She was 85. Ella Lanahan was born in Baltimore and graduated from St. Jerome's Business School in 1932. She then attended Strayer Business College and worked at the Maryland Department of Assessment and Taxation in Annapolis. She entered the Sisters of Bon Secours, a Roman Catholic religious order of women, in 1942 and took her final vows in 1951.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | March 12, 1992
The Blast, with its 15-17 record, may be winding down another disappointing season but there's still realistic hope of making the playoffs."We have home games tomorrow night [against Cleveland] and Saturday afternoon [San Diego]," says owner Ed Hale, "and we're expecting 9,000 to 10,000 for each. If we win both games we'll be 17-17 with six games left, three of those at home."There are two playoff spots left and four teams are fighting for them [Blast, Cleveland, Tacoma and Wichita]. We think with 20 wins we can get in the playoffs.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | December 24, 1994
Back to work, boys. File your complaints, prepare your lawsuits, then tell the owners, "See you in spring training."The strategy would be simple.End the strike, not the fight.It's the best option for the union, the one that would put its members in position to receive a paycheck, rather than force them to decide whether to cross a picket line.It's also the option that serves the best interests of the game, not that either side would dare entertain such a ridiculous concept.Back to work, boys -- but not right away.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1996
Last winter, I received a nice letter from a fan asking if we might stop writing about money matters in baseball during the off-season, and write more about the game.Sounds great, but it's impossible. Everything done in the major leagues is predicated on money or lack thereof, and Albert Belle's $55 million contract will make all teams more diligent about how they spend their dollars. In this strange world created by former union leader Marvin Miller (who began the salary spiral) and Chicago White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf (who is responsible for signing Belle and altering baseball's salary structure dramatically)
SPORTS
December 9, 2009
Yes, he brought progress Dom Amore, Hartford Courant Once again, the Hall of Fame's veterans committee missed its chance to do the right thing. Marvin Miller fell two votes short. Miller deserves to be in Cooperstown. Yes, he is a polarizing figure, and those who believe a baseball player should have been bound to his team forever if the team so desired will never forgive Miller for bringing baseball into the 20th Century and striking down the reserve clause. No figure has had more impact, brought more change to baseball.
SPORTS
December 9, 2009
Yes, he brought progress Dom Amore, Hartford Courant Once again, the Hall of Fame's veterans committee missed its chance to do the right thing. Marvin Miller fell two votes short. Miller deserves to be in Cooperstown. Yes, he is a polarizing figure, and those who believe a baseball player should have been bound to his team forever if the team so desired will never forgive Miller for bringing baseball into the 20th Century and striking down the reserve clause. No figure has had more impact, brought more change to baseball.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley | May 20, 2004
Some of the most influential people in sports labor and management will be in town today as the Sports Lawyer Association opens its 30th annual conference at the Hyatt Regency. Nearly 400 are expected to attend - including high-ranking executives from the NFL, Major League Baseball, NHL and NBA - to hear speakers and panel discussions on a variety of legal issues at the three-day meetings. "With all those leagues represented, that's what make it so special," said locally-based agent Tony Agnone, who is serving as the conference's program chairman.
NEWS
August 9, 2001
Sister Mary Augustine, 85, worked at hospitals Sister Mary Augustine, who worked in medical institutions run by the Sisters of Bon Secours, died Monday of heart failure at Marian Hall in Marriottsville. She was 85. Ella Lanahan was born in Baltimore and graduated from St. Jerome's Business School in 1932. She then attended Strayer Business College and worked at the Maryland Department of Assessment and Taxation in Annapolis. She entered the Sisters of Bon Secours, a Roman Catholic religious order of women, in 1942 and took her final vows in 1951.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1996
Last winter, I received a nice letter from a fan asking if we might stop writing about money matters in baseball during the off-season, and write more about the game.Sounds great, but it's impossible. Everything done in the major leagues is predicated on money or lack thereof, and Albert Belle's $55 million contract will make all teams more diligent about how they spend their dollars. In this strange world created by former union leader Marvin Miller (who began the salary spiral) and Chicago White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf (who is responsible for signing Belle and altering baseball's salary structure dramatically)
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | December 24, 1994
Back to work, boys. File your complaints, prepare your lawsuits, then tell the owners, "See you in spring training."The strategy would be simple.End the strike, not the fight.It's the best option for the union, the one that would put its members in position to receive a paycheck, rather than force them to decide whether to cross a picket line.It's also the option that serves the best interests of the game, not that either side would dare entertain such a ridiculous concept.Back to work, boys -- but not right away.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | March 12, 1992
The Blast, with its 15-17 record, may be winding down another disappointing season but there's still realistic hope of making the playoffs."We have home games tomorrow night [against Cleveland] and Saturday afternoon [San Diego]," says owner Ed Hale, "and we're expecting 9,000 to 10,000 for each. If we win both games we'll be 17-17 with six games left, three of those at home."There are two playoff spots left and four teams are fighting for them [Blast, Cleveland, Tacoma and Wichita]. We think with 20 wins we can get in the playoffs.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | January 4, 1995
A Baltimore police officer fatally shot a 24-year-old man who allegedly pulled out a knife during a struggle in a Westside alley -- the first of two incidents in which officers shot suspects last night, authorities said.The shooting took place near the 1800 block of W. Fayette St. about 6:45 p.m. after Officer David Shields "observed what he believed to be a drug transaction" and chased the man into the alley, police said.According to Officer Sabrina Tapp-Harper, a police spokeswoman, the suspect threatened Officer Shields with a "lock-blade knife."
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | September 17, 2012
Orioles manager Buck Showalter said he is still optimistic that Jason Hammel can return this season to pitch for the Orioles, but the big right-hander has not tested his right knee on a mound since leaving a game Sept. 11. “Slow. Not imminent that he moves to another step yet,” Showalter said. “Oh, sure I'm optimistic, we just haven't had anything where, 'Hey, this feels pretty good, let's start throwing yet.' We haven't gotten the discomfort out of there yet.” Around the horn Miguel Gonzalez likely will start Friday's game in Boston.
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