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August 10, 2012
For many years my wife Fran and I were subscribers to the Baltimore Pops series at the Meyerhoff. We especially enjoyed the years during Marvin Hamlisch's tenure as principal pops conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. Little did we know that he was also a big time baseball fan. My wife Fran, known throughout Camden Yards for many years as one of the Orioles' best fans, was delighted when we were invited to a Yankees-Oriole game at Yankee Stadium to see Mike Messina, after leaving Baltimore, pitch for the Yankees against the Orioles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
Orchestras these days like to put titles on programs, which usually means a dash of the cute, the trite or the hyperbolic. But the title given to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's SuperPops offering this weekend strikes just the right note - "Marvin Hamlisch: One Singular Sensation. " The personable, prodigious composer was a singular force who created sensational scores for Broadway and Hollywood. His three Oscars, four Grammys, four Emmys, three Golden Globes, a Tony and Pulitzer Prize affirm that.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 29, 1998
The first Baltimore Symphony pops concert of the season is also a classical-music concert. Classical, that is, if you understand the term to refer to great music that lasts and that belongs as much to the European as to African-American traditions.We are talking about the music of George Gershwin, who, 100 years after his birth, remains this country's best-known composer and the one whom -- to audiences and musicians elsewhere on Earth -- epitomizes American music.BSO principal pops conductor Marvin Hamlisch will conduct an all-Gershwin program Oct 1-4 in honor of the composer's centennial.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
J. Ernest Green, artistic director for Live Arts Maryland, began the company's season last month with an auspicious opener: "One Singular Sensation: A Celebration of the Music of Marvin Hamlisch. " The performance in late September showcased stellar guest soloists collaborating with the Annapolis Chorale and Youth Chorus and other youth groups at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. It's fitting for Green to showcase the late Broadway and Hollywood composer's favorite works - after all, he worked closely with Hamlisch for 11 years, often conducting with and for him in a relationship that began in 2002 when Green was a cover conductor with the National Symphony Orchestra.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
NEW YORK -- When Marvin Hamlisch steps onto the podium today for his debut as the principal pops conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, many of the elements of theater will be present.There will be dimmed lights. A romantic theme. Punch lines. Dramatic tension. Staging. Catchy music.And a star, of course: The conductor himself.All of which is part of the plan."My background is in music, but in the theater. So these programs have some theatrical basis. I'll be playing the piano and speaking.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 24, 1997
This afternoon in Meyerhoff Hall, Marvin Hamlisch will begin to put new life into the Baltimore Symphony's Superpops Series.The theme of today's concert, as well as those tomorrow, Saturday and Sunday, is "Search for a Star." Hamlisch, the Pulitzer Prize-winning composer of "A Chorus Line" who is in his first year as the BSO's first-ever Principal Pops Conductor, spent this year auditioning local talent, ultimately selecting 12 finalists for this week's concerts.But the new life Hamlisch wants to see is not only on the Meyerhoff's stage, but in lines in front of the box office.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 23, 1996
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra gave itself a double-barreled shot in the arm yesterday with the appointments of conductor-composer Marvin Hamlisch and violinist-conductor Pinchas Zukerman to head up two of the orchestra's faltering series.Hamlisch, 51, was named BSO principal pops conductor, while Zukerman was named Summer MusicFest artistic director.The orchestra hopes Hamlisch's appointment will revive its floundering Super Pops Series. Zukerman's appointment is expected to help the BSO's summer season, which has lost its sense of purpose and suffered stagnant ticket sales ever since BSO music director David Zinman became director of the Minnesota Orchestra's summer series two seasons ago. While the cost of putting on each series has dramatically increased in the last few years, ticket sales have remained at the same levels, resulting in net losses for the BSO."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 9, 2000
Despite its title, the current Baltimore Symphony SuperPops program - "A Star-Spangled Salute with Marvin Hamlisch" - isn't just a flag-waving, Yankee Doodle, born on the Fourth of July patriotic spectacle. Sure, the program boasts patriotic songs aplenty, and ends with a red-white-and-blue salute to Old Glory itself. But there was also ample time allotted for other forms of Americana, and that, ultimately, was what made yesterday's performance at the Meyerhoff so thoroughly entertaining.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 8, 2000
The biggest problem Marvin Hamlisch has with the world of symphonic pops is making arrangements. It's not that his schedule is so jammed that he can't find time to conduct concerts like the ones he's leading with the Baltimore Symphony this week (his final stint as the BSO's SuperPops conductor). Nor does he have difficulty booking guest musicians; as he puts it, "When I'm making my calendar each year, I start out with blank pages. If someone wants to work with me, I can always find a time that fits."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 2, 1998
Larry Adler is one of those peculiar, almost impossible-to-classify figures who crop up in the music world every few decades or so.The Baltimore-born Adler, 84, ranks among the important American musicians of this century. But his position -- at least in his native country -- has always been marginalized by two factors. They are his instrument, the lowly harmonica or mouth organ and his politically incorrect social views, which (in the late 1940s) led to his being placed on a blacklist that made it impossible for him to earn a living in the United States when he was at the height of his fame.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Music director J. Ernest Green talks with excitement as he discusses the coming season of Live Arts Maryland, made up of the 170-voice Annapolis Chorale, the Annapolis Chamber Orchestra, the Annapolis Youth Chorus and a group of vocalists and nationally prominent guest soloists. This season will offer three classical performances, the annual "Messiah" at historic St. Anne's Church in three December shows and concerts featuring popular favorites. The opening concert Sept. 21 at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts will feature the music of Marvin Hamlisch in the tribute "One Singular Sensation.
NEWS
August 10, 2012
For many years my wife Fran and I were subscribers to the Baltimore Pops series at the Meyerhoff. We especially enjoyed the years during Marvin Hamlisch's tenure as principal pops conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. Little did we know that he was also a big time baseball fan. My wife Fran, known throughout Camden Yards for many years as one of the Orioles' best fans, was delighted when we were invited to a Yankees-Oriole game at Yankee Stadium to see Mike Messina, after leaving Baltimore, pitch for the Yankees against the Orioles.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 9, 2000
Despite its title, the current Baltimore Symphony SuperPops program - "A Star-Spangled Salute with Marvin Hamlisch" - isn't just a flag-waving, Yankee Doodle, born on the Fourth of July patriotic spectacle. Sure, the program boasts patriotic songs aplenty, and ends with a red-white-and-blue salute to Old Glory itself. But there was also ample time allotted for other forms of Americana, and that, ultimately, was what made yesterday's performance at the Meyerhoff so thoroughly entertaining.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 8, 2000
The biggest problem Marvin Hamlisch has with the world of symphonic pops is making arrangements. It's not that his schedule is so jammed that he can't find time to conduct concerts like the ones he's leading with the Baltimore Symphony this week (his final stint as the BSO's SuperPops conductor). Nor does he have difficulty booking guest musicians; as he puts it, "When I'm making my calendar each year, I start out with blank pages. If someone wants to work with me, I can always find a time that fits."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | June 8, 2000
AROUND THE HARBOR Volleyball Marathon Take part or cheer on teams in the 24th annual Volleyball Marathon and third annual Volleyball Tournament this weekend at Rash Field. Players spike up for the National Kidney Foundation of Maryland from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. There also will be information booths on health-related subjects and children's activities, including face-painting. Admission is free for spectators both days. Registration for players is free Saturday and $35 Sunday.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 2, 1998
Larry Adler is one of those peculiar, almost impossible-to-classify figures who crop up in the music world every few decades or so.The Baltimore-born Adler, 84, ranks among the important American musicians of this century. But his position -- at least in his native country -- has always been marginalized by two factors. They are his instrument, the lowly harmonica or mouth organ and his politically incorrect social views, which (in the late 1940s) led to his being placed on a blacklist that made it impossible for him to earn a living in the United States when he was at the height of his fame.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 17, 1997
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director David Zinman rarely does anything without adequate preparation.But the classical half of Sunday evening's concert for the musicians' pension fund -- the after-intermission pops portion was conducted by Marvin Hamlisch -- was one of those occasions when he had to. For several weeks, the orchestra has been performing one difficult program after another, and the musicians could not have had as much as a single full...
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Music director J. Ernest Green talks with excitement as he discusses the coming season of Live Arts Maryland, made up of the 170-voice Annapolis Chorale, the Annapolis Chamber Orchestra, the Annapolis Youth Chorus and a group of vocalists and nationally prominent guest soloists. This season will offer three classical performances, the annual "Messiah" at historic St. Anne's Church in three December shows and concerts featuring popular favorites. The opening concert Sept. 21 at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts will feature the music of Marvin Hamlisch in the tribute "One Singular Sensation.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 29, 1998
The first Baltimore Symphony pops concert of the season is also a classical-music concert. Classical, that is, if you understand the term to refer to great music that lasts and that belongs as much to the European as to African-American traditions.We are talking about the music of George Gershwin, who, 100 years after his birth, remains this country's best-known composer and the one whom -- to audiences and musicians elsewhere on Earth -- epitomizes American music.BSO principal pops conductor Marvin Hamlisch will conduct an all-Gershwin program Oct 1-4 in honor of the composer's centennial.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | September 20, 1998
Social calendarSept: 24: Women in Film & Video Second Annual Charm City Award Dinner honors Tom Kiefaber, Senator Theatre owner; Rhea Feiken, MPT; and Sharon Steele, Steele Casting. Belvedere Hotel, 1 E. Chase St. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. WIFV members $35, others $40. Call 410-685-FILM.Sept. 26: National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Baltimore Metropolitan Chapter, Ninth Annual Torchbearer Awards Breakfast. Martin's West, 6817 Dogwood Road. 8:30 a.m. to noon. $25. Call 410-448-0839.Sept. 26: An Evening with Roberta Flack benefits Woodbourne's Children and Families.
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