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NEWS
By Jim Remsen and Jim Remsen,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 1, 2000
Today is a red-letter day not only for the supporters of Mother Katharine Drexel. Two other nuns and 120 martyrs killed in China will become saints as well during the pontifical Mass in St. Peter's Square. Crowds of supporters who have made pilgrimages from around the globe will attend. Vatican officials want the four canonizations "to represent world unity" by drawing from different continents, said Regina Tracy, spokeswoman for Mother Drexel's order, the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament.
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NEWS
August 1, 2014
Letter writer Judy Chernak eloquently addresses the realities of fighting a war against a terrorist organization that has enmeshed itself in a civilian population ( "Hamas must give up its rockets before talks can proceed," July 29). Every Palestinian child who dies is considered by Hamas to be a martyr and a worthwhile sacrifice. Their belief system values death over life. Those who sacrifice their lives receive many riches and their families are honored. At the same time, Hamas astutely recognizes that the rest of the world values life over death, and they also realize that the media focus on the civilians who are killed and that grieving families benefits their cause.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 14, 1999
WARSAW, Poland -- At a Mass before 1 million pilgrims who turned the center of the Polish capital into a human sea, Pope John Paul II beatified 110 martyrs yesterday and called on fellow Poles to emulate the sacrifice and charity of Roman Catholic victims of history.The beatification ceremonies drew one of the biggest gatherings of the pope's 20-year pontificate as he sent the 110 who gave their lives for their faith to the last step before sainthood.The Mass that flooded sprawling Pilsudski Square with worshipers and filled streets and intersections over a square mile was celebrated at the same site where Pope John Paul used his first papal Mass in his homeland in 1979 to issue a call that would ignite Eastern Europe's pro-democracy movements.
NEWS
February 2, 2014
As much as I would love to see monster Dzhokhar Tsarnaev executed, one consideration holds me back and is missing from your report. Namely, if he were put to death, it would make him a martyr in the eyes of radical Islamic terrorists ("Death penalty sought for alleged Boston bomber Tsarnaev," Jan. 30). After the horror of 9/11, I've studied this diabolical mindset and came away sickened to learn dying for a cause creates a man or woman to be venerated. It also assures the deceased will gain magnificent afterlife rewards.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 2000
ROME - Pope John Paul II canonized yesterday 120 Roman Catholics killed in China, defying the Chinese government, which had condemned the action as an insulting reminder of colonial imperialism. The canonizations, which also made a saint of Mother Katharine Drexel, a turn-of-the-century American philanthropist, underlined the complex geopolitics that run through the Vatican's spiritual mission. China had no saints before yesterday. By canonizing as martyrs 87 Chinese believers and 33 European missionaries killed between 1648 and 1930, Pope John Paul sought to send a strong signal to China's beleaguered underground Catholics, who are loyal to the pope.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2000
Emmett Till was only 14 in 1955 when he said a flippant remark to a white Mississippi shopkeeper. In an incident that made perfect sense according to the mores of the time and place, young Emmett was beaten to death a few days later by the woman's husband and brother-in-law, who dumped his body in the Tallahatchee River. Fortunately, the mores of 1950s Mississippi weren't shared by the rest of the country -- particularly when pictures of Emmett's bloated, misshapen corpse appeared on newspaper front pages.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 9, 2003
AMARI REFUGEE CAMP, West Bank - His face unshaven and his clothes disheveled, Khalid Idris deftly roams the back alleys here, sleeping in a different house each night to avoid the Israeli army patrols searching for him. The burly 36-year-old is a member of the Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, the militant wing of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat's mainstream Fatah political party. But Idris increasingly finds himself at odds with Fatah, whose leaders have repeatedly called for an end to attacks inside Israel.
NEWS
July 8, 2004
On July 6, 2004, MICHAEL CHO of Odenton; beloved husband of Tina Cho; devoted father of Ava K. Cho; loving son of Kyong Soon and Sung Chul; dear brother of David J. Cho and Mary Y. Lee. Also survived by many loving relatives. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held Thursday, 11 AM at the Holy Korean Martyrs Catholic Church. Interment Crest Lawn Memorial Gardens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff | March 11, 2001
"Martyrs' Crossing," by Amy Wilentz. Simon and Schuster. 311 pages. $24. A 2-year-old boy is acutely ill with asthma. His mother walks in search of a taxi to take them to a hospital. But Marina Raad Hajimi, watching her son Ibrahim turn blue, must navigate a checkpoint on the road, as well as barricades in her mind. For there are innumerable barriers to a normal life in the Middle East. On this afternoon of stone-throwing and tear gas, the Israeli soldiers at an army checkpoint have orders to stop Palestinians from traveling farther, even a young mother carrying a sick child.
NEWS
By Uli Schmetzer and Uli Schmetzer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 4, 2003
JERUSALEM - Israeli soldiers killed a Palestinian militant during a gunbattle in the West Bank yesterday, prompting a threat of reprisal within 24 hours as the fragile Israeli-Palestinian peace deal - not yet a week old - survived another day of violence. Earlier, Palestinian militants fired anti-tank shells into the Jewish settlement of Kfar Darom in the Gaza Strip, wounding four settlers. Israeli soldiers closed the main north-south Gaza highway but later reopened it. Hours earlier, Israeli forces had handed over control of Bethlehem to Palestinian police.
NEWS
November 24, 2009
K halid Sheikh Mohammed and his co-defendants have announced through their lawyers that they intend to plead not guilty to charges of conspiring to perpetrate the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on New York and the Washington area. But Mr. Mohammed and his henchmen aren't denying their involvement in the worst terrorist strike on U.S. soil in American history; on the contrary, they're boasting of their intention to turn the trial in New York into a media circus that will enable them to preach their philosophy of violent jihad to a worldwide audience.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 16, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Angry crowds in the Iraqi town of Tikrit fired weapons in the air and chanted "God is great" yesterday as they received the flag-draped bodies of two former aides to Saddam Hussein who were hanged early in the day. Barzan Ibrahim and Awad Hamed al-Bandar were executed for their roles in killing scores of Shiite Muslim villagers in the 1980s. The hanging by rope ripped off the head of Ibrahim, Hussein's half brother and a fellow native of Tikrit. Ibrahim had served as leader of Iraq's feared intelligence service, while al-Bandar headed the Revolutionary Court that sentenced 148 villagers to death after a 1982 assassination attempt against the late president.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,Los Angeles Times | December 6, 2006
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- He was a poor, young man shot dead on the outskirts of town in a flurry of fighting that nobody can quite explain. But by the time Ahmed Mahmoud was buried yesterday under a shower of flowering branches, flanked by Shiite "martyrs" in a cool, quiet cemetery, the neighborhood mechanic had acquired a fame and import he had never tasted in his 21 years. Clerics and lawmakers trooped dutifully to the mosque to pray over his body. His coffin was lugged as a political display through throngs of anti-government demonstrators laying siege to downtown Beirut.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | December 6, 2006
Boy, talk about learning something new every day. The URL for the Web site is www.savejustin. org. The "Justin" in this case is one Justin Park, who with two ads inviting students to a "Halloween in the Hood" party set off the biggest dispute on the Johns Hopkins University campus in years. University officials recently suspended Park until the spring semester of 2008 for posting the ads, which some claim were racially offensive. (Park referred to Baltimore as an "hiv pit" and used terms like "hoochie hoops" and "bling."
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,sun reporter | October 3, 2006
The case is closed - if not solved. In her hands, Evangeline Moore weighs the 370-page "Homicide Investigation." The bound notebook feels heavy and right - unlike earlier and lighter investigations into the Christmas 1951 murders of her parents - an NAACP official named Harry T. Moore and his wife, Harriette Moore. Although justice was neither swift nor conclusive, Evangeline Moore says she is satisfied. Finally, she believes, the state of Florida took the cold case seriously. "I feel like a load has been lifted off of my shoulders," says Moore, 76, from her home in New Carrollton.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 12, 2005
IF MICHAEL Schwerner had never come to Baltimore in 1963, would he have died in Mississippi in 1964? In the summer of 1963, Schwerner was among the hundreds of demonstrators who sought to desegregate the Gwynn Oak Amusement Park. "It was the first demonstration he ever participated in," said Taylor Branch, who has written two books in a trilogy he's doing on the life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and was finishing the third even as I interviewed him. In August 1964, Schwerner's body was found in an earthen dam along with those of James Chaney and Andrew Goodman.
NEWS
August 16, 2001
Seth H. Moseley, 92, who helped cover the Hindenburg disaster for the Associated Press, died Saturday in Torrington, Conn. In March 1932, while a reporter for the New York Evening Journal, Mr. Moseley obtained an exclusive interview with Charles A. Lindbergh hours after the aviator's infant son was kidnapped from Mr. Lindbergh's Hopewell, N.J., home. He also reported on the September 1934 shipboard fire that killed 134 people and set the SS Morro Castle adrift off the New Jersey coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 19, 2003
The Hippie Dictionary: A Cultural Encyclopedia of the 1960s and 1970s, by John Bassett McCleary (Ten Speed Press, 720 pages, $19.95) For a book that on first and last glance is simply a rollicking lot of fun, this is an extraordinarily thorough and scholarly piece of work. The core of the book is the encyclopedia itself -- definitions and explanations, ranging from "acid funk: an LSD-induced depression," to half a page defining "true hippie," beginning thus: "a person who lives by the Golden Rule."
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