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March 11, 1998
Life on the pro tennis tour is a ball for 17-year-old Martina Hingis! She is the No. 1 women's tennis player in the world. Last year, she won three of the four Grand Slam tournaments.Martina was born in Czechoslovakia and she grew up in Switzerland. She played in her first tournament at age 5.Martina says the strongest part of her game is her mental toughness. "I never give up," she says. "I stay calm and use my head."Rescued by the Rain?The Polecats are playing the Bombers in baseball, by major- league rules.
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Sports Digest | July 10, 2013
Et cetera Pikesville's Oshrine takes slim lead at Maryland Open Matt Oshrine , 17, of Pikesville and the Suburban Club shot a second-round 67 for a 36-hole total of 133 to take a one-stroke lead in the 92nd Maryland Open golf tournament at the Country Club of Maryland in Towson. Rick Schuller of Prince George, Va., was the low professional (68) with 134, where he was tied with 2010 champion Denny McCarthy (68) of Rockville and Argyle CC. First-round leader Keith Unikel of University of Maryland GC slipped back with a 71 and was at 136. With the field reduced to the low 40 and ties for today's final round, the cut fell at 144. World TeamTennis: With a 25-12 victory over the Boston Lobsters, the host Washington Kastles extended their winning streak to 34 consecutive matches, breaking the record they shared with the NBA's 1971-72 Los Angeles Lakers.
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December 29, 2005
"It is an opportunity to utilize this as a home playoff game. There will be no talk whatsoever about any other scenario." Bill Cowher Pittsburgh Steelers coach, on not wanting his team to consider having a playoff spot clinched before kickoff "I want to see what she's got. I haven't played her since she was 12." Martina Hingis On facing Maria Sharapova upon Hingis' return to pro tennis "It's a hurdle you have to get over when you're losing. And that hurdle is much greater than your draft status."
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December 29, 2005
"It is an opportunity to utilize this as a home playoff game. There will be no talk whatsoever about any other scenario." Bill Cowher Pittsburgh Steelers coach, on not wanting his team to consider having a playoff spot clinched before kickoff "I want to see what she's got. I haven't played her since she was 12." Martina Hingis On facing Maria Sharapova upon Hingis' return to pro tennis "It's a hurdle you have to get over when you're losing. And that hurdle is much greater than your draft status."
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By ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | December 29, 1997
Voices of 1997:"The Jets." -- Sean Jones, Green Bay Packers defensive end, when asked who he would prefer to play in the Super Bowl, Jan. 12."Her blood alcohol count was .14, .13, .10, .14, and .14 by the German judge." -- David Letterman, after figure skater Oksana Baiul's arrest for drunken driving, Jan. 18."He's always been talkative, but usually it's under oath." -- Sandy Alderson, Oakland Athletics general manager, on Chicago White Sox outfielder Albert Belle, Feb. 24."That's scary. The only thing worse would be if they cloned Joe Oliver."
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
WIMBLEDON, England -- It was only fitting on the last day of this extended Wimbledon that history would be made one more time when Martina Hingis became the youngest champion in the tournament's history.Up 4-1 in the third set of the women's doubles finals when play resumed yesterday morning, Hingis and her partner, Helena Sukova, who were seeded eighth, won two straight games to take the championship, beating No. 4 seeds Meredith McGrath and Larisa Neiland, 5-7, 7-5, 6-1.It was their first Grand Slam title as partners and, with the victory, Hingis, 15 years and 282 days old, became the youngest-ever Wimbledon champion -- by three days.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 1997
MELBOURNE, Australia -- Although a name does not a champion make, the die was cast on this champion's destiny when her parents named their only daughter after Martina Navratilova, the greatest player to emerge from their native Czechoslovakia.Yesterday, on a sun-drenched center court a continent away from her European roots, 16-year-old Martina Hingis emphatically claimed that destiny. And then some.On a hot day in Melbourne, Hingis became the youngest Grand Slam champion in more than a century by shellacking another former prodigy, 22-year-old Mary Pierce, 6-2, 6-2, in the women's final of the Australian Open.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1997
NEW YORK -- Lindsay Davenport is never going to be a pinup like Martina Hingis or Anna Kournikova. But unlike Kournikova, Davenport is still in the U.S. Open, and because Davenport is one of just two players to beat Hingis this season, she is a popular choice to win her first Grand Slam tournament.But history says the odds of her doing it are not great.Davenport, the top American-born seed at No. 6, is 21. Only one great player in the past 30 years won her first Grand Slam after her teen-age years.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 4, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- It was supposed to be the liftoff of a great tennis rivalry.Instead, yesterday's Wimbledon women's semifinal match between Martina Hingis and Anna Kournikova was a letdown.They played like a pair of scared 16-year-olds.Still, No. 1-ranked Hingis emerged with a 6-3, 6-2 victory over Kournikova to move into tomorrow's women's final, where she'll face No. 3 Jana Novotna.Novotna cleared the semifinals by beating former doubles partner Arantxa Sanchez Vicario, 6-4, 6-2.The Hingis-Kournikova match was filled with hope and possibility.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1998
The U.S. Open captured the imagination a year ago. Australian Patrick Rafter revived the exquisite serve-and-volley game while winning the U.S. Open, his first career Grand Slam; and Venus Williams breathed new life into the women's game. As her beaded hair clickity-clacked, she took center stage and became the first unseeded woman in 39 years to reach the Open final, before losing to No. 1 Martina Hingis.Now the Open is again ready to see history made. But will it?As the two-week tournament begins tomorrow in New York, No. 1 seed Pete Sampras is just one win shy of Roy Emerson's record 12 Grand Slam victories.
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By Lisa Dillman and Lisa Dillman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 3, 2005
PARIS - If people thought the women's semifinals at last year's French Open were tedious, yesterday's weak offerings made them look downright competitive. Nadia Petrova of Russia won only five games against Justine Henin-Hardenne of Belgium in the first semifinal, and Elena Likhovtseva of Russia came away with two in the second semifinal against Mary Pierce of France. Henin-Hardenne, about as close to a native as one can get without having been born in France, was boosted by strong crowd support from traveling Belgian fans.
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By LAURA VECSEY | July 19, 2003
BALTIMOREANS recognized during Wednesday night's ESPY Awards were Carmelo Anthony, male college athlete of the year; swimmer Michael Phelps, three-time world-record holder currently in Barcelona, Spain, for the world championships; Johnny Unitas, who died last Sept. 11; and Diane Geppi-Aikens, the Loyola College women's lacrosse coach who died of cancer June 29. It was a stirring, stellar representation. Dating game: ESPY Awards host Jamie Foxx, meanwhile, spilled some interesting beans about Keyshawn Johnson dating Serena Williams.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2002
NEW YORK -- Serena and Venus Williams, Jennifer Capriati, Lindsay Davenport. They're the Murderers' Row of women's tennis. And what about Martina Hingis? What about the woman who held the No. 1 position on the women's tour for 209 weeks? What about her? Yesterday, a little off center stage in the Louis Armstrong Stadium at the U.S. Open, Hingis played her first Grand Slam tennis match since losing the Australian Open final to Capriati in January. She is slowly making her way back into the consciousness of the tennis world after having been sidelined for much of the past eight months with two ankle surgeries, the most recent in May. During her recovery, she mostly enjoyed the company of her boyfriend, professional golfer Sergio Garcia.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 26, 2001
WIMBLEDON, England - Martina Hingis and Jennifer Capriati know all about being tennis phenoms, giving up the wonder years to the sponsors, pleasing the parents, living with the unbearable expectations. Yesterday, their captivating personal tales and divergent fortunes played out in the searing English summer sun on Wimbledon's opening day. Over on Court 1, Hingis was on the way down, fighting a bad back and a feisty opponent, losing badly to Virginia Ruano Pascual, 6-4, 6-2. It was the second time in the past three years the No. 1 seed was ousted in Wimbledon's first round.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
NEW YORK - The women's championship trophy for the U.S. Open is not changing residences. It will remain on the Florida estate of Venus and Serena Williams. One year after watching her little sister win the family's first major professional title here last year at Arthur Ashe Stadium, Venus Williams took the glittering silver hardware home to Palm Beach Gardens after a 6-4, 7-5 victory last night over Lindsay Davenport. Overcoming a shaky start in which she lost four of the first five games, Williams used her blazing speed and a blistering, if somewhat erratic, serve to win five straight games and 21 of 31 points.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 2000
PARIS - It could finally be Martina Hingis' year at the French Open. It could again be Gustavo Kuerten's or Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario's; could even be Mary Pierce's. But what is certain after an overstuffed afternoon of quarterfinal action yesterday is that it will not be an American's. For the first time in 33 years, no U.S. man or woman will take part in the semifinals of the world's premier clay-court tournament. Monica Seles, Venus Williams and Chanda Rubin were all beaten yesterday, and the crushed red brick at Roland Garros has been left to the Spanish, the Swiss, the Brazilians and, technically speaking at least, the French.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 24, 1998
WIMBLEDON, England -- Welcome back to Wimbledon, Martina Hingis.The player you met -- Lisa Raymond -- said you looked "a little apprehensive."The legends in the broadcast booth -- Martina Navratilova and Billie Jean King -- questioned your fitness and attitude.About the only thing that went right with your 1998 Wimbledon debut yesterday was that you beat the rain and won your match over Raymond, 7-5, 6-3, to open defense of the women's title.At 17, Hingis is learning that it's hard to be No. 1 and harder still to try to regain the most precious trophy in tennis.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1997
PARIS -- Martina Hingis has been No. 1 for two months, hardly long enough to forget her predecessors, Steffi Graf and Monica Seles. Hardly long enough to know if she intends to make a home in the penthouse suite.So yesterday, when Hingis walked on to Court Central at the French Open for her semifinal match against Seles, the No. 3 seed and now No. 2 women's tennis player in the world, every seat was taken.This match would be Hingis' first real test in this Grand Slam and her first big test since becoming No. 1. She had beaten Seles twice earlier this spring, in a third-set tiebreaker in Hilton Head, S.C., and in a two-set romp at the Lipton on a hard court.
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September 1, 1998
NEW YORK -- Start spreading the news: Pete Sampras is feeling historic, Martina Hingis is feeling acquisitive and Goran Ivanisevic is feeling that the turbo-charged hard courts at the U.S. Open are delivering his aces almost faster than he can send them across the net.Leave it to the U.S. Open, which cranked itself up to full speed yesterday at the National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, Queens, to cut through the late summer haze and cut right to...
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1998
The U.S. Open captured the imagination a year ago. Australian Patrick Rafter revived the exquisite serve-and-volley game while winning the U.S. Open, his first career Grand Slam; and Venus Williams breathed new life into the women's game. As her beaded hair clickity-clacked, she took center stage and became the first unseeded woman in 39 years to reach the Open final, before losing to No. 1 Martina Hingis.Now the Open is again ready to see history made. But will it?As the two-week tournament begins tomorrow in New York, No. 1 seed Pete Sampras is just one win shy of Roy Emerson's record 12 Grand Slam victories.
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