Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMartin Zweig
IN THE NEWS

Martin Zweig

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 20, 1998
EVEN THOUGH profit-takers dropped the Dow 75.48 points yesterday, snapping a six-session streak of record high closes, the blue chip index has pushed up nearly 9 percent over its nearly monthlong rally. From the dizzying height of 8,375.58, we offer investors some helpful gleanings from various publications:Baltimore-based Adams Express is listed under "Closed-End Funds: The Best of the Bunch," in Business Week, Feb. 16.Black & Decker stock appeared in the "12-Month New High" listings several times recently.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | March 20, 1998
WHAT happens to high-quality stocks in a bear market? Blue-chip issues decline, but not as sharply as low- and medium-quality stocks. And high-grade issues recover quicker.This morning, the Dow Jones industrial average stands at 8,803.05, up 894.80 points, or 11.31 percent, from New Year's Day. If you fear a stock market tumble from this stratospheric level, should you sell most of your time-tested, high-quality stocks? No.Why not? For one thing, we might not suffer a major setback. If stocks did plunge, the decline could precede a fast recovery, as after sharp dives of Oct. 19, 1987, and "Bloody Monday" of Oct. 27, 1997.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | March 20, 1998
WHAT happens to high-quality stocks in a bear market? Blue-chip issues decline, but not as sharply as low- and medium-quality stocks. And high-grade issues recover quicker.This morning, the Dow Jones industrial average stands at 8,803.05, up 894.80 points, or 11.31 percent, from New Year's Day. If you fear a stock market tumble from this stratospheric level, should you sell most of your time-tested, high-quality stocks? No.Why not? For one thing, we might not suffer a major setback. If stocks did plunge, the decline could precede a fast recovery, as after sharp dives of Oct. 19, 1987, and "Bloody Monday" of Oct. 27, 1997.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 20, 1998
EVEN THOUGH profit-takers dropped the Dow 75.48 points yesterday, snapping a six-session streak of record high closes, the blue chip index has pushed up nearly 9 percent over its nearly monthlong rally. From the dizzying height of 8,375.58, we offer investors some helpful gleanings from various publications:Baltimore-based Adams Express is listed under "Closed-End Funds: The Best of the Bunch," in Business Week, Feb. 16.Black & Decker stock appeared in the "12-Month New High" listings several times recently.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 12, 1997
Today we answer readers' questions:DOLLAR DOINGS: "Does the recent strong dollar affect my stocks?"The dollar's ups and downs don't affect the whole market; certain groups benefit while others falter.The strong dollar, which last week hit a four-year high against the Japanese yen, helps retailers like Circuit City, Dillards and Nordstrom that sell mostly in the United States but buy goods abroad.Yet the rising dollar is most harmful to "multinational" firms that are big exporters, like Microsoft, Compaq Computer, Novell, Warner-Lambert and Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | January 26, 1995
Stocks spent much of yesterday on the rise, climbing more than 28 points before sliding in the last hour of trading. The Dow Jones industrial average closed up 8.75 points to close at 3,871.45. Compaq Computer Corp. put a shudder through the market, and other technology stocks, by announcing that its profit growth in the first quarter would slow.LOOKING BACK: "I sure hope the Republicans are able to cut the capital gains tax, but I'm not sure how that would affectstocks. Looking back, we find that one month after the 1978 tax cut was enacted the Dow had lost 12 percent and the OTC was off 18 percent.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | September 10, 1992
In the wake of the lowest T-bill rates in 29 years, the Dow Jones average gained 11 points yesterday, closing at 3,271.39. The last time T-bill rates sank below 3 percent, in 1963, the Dow index hovered around the 750 level.TAKE YOUR CHOICE: "I'm not wild about stocks at this point. Buy intermediate-term bonds, 3-7 years." (Martin Zweig) . . . "With the economy still very rough it's surprising how resilient stocks are, but it's a good time to get in; some 1993 earnings will be quite strong."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 19, 1991
Edging up six points, the Dow Jones average closed yesterday at 2,908.09, up 275 points, or 10 percent, this year to date. Yesterday's close stands about 2,000 points above the Dow level 10 years ago this week (DJ 910), a healthy gain of 228 percent in a decade.AND NOW WHERE? "Recession is likely to continue well into 1992, with lower interest rates. DJ should hold above 2,870." (Financial Commentator) . . . "Economic valley deepens; reduce stock exposure by half." (Astute Investor, Robert Nurock)
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | May 9, 1991
After the Dow Jones average touched 3,000 and promptly slid below the "magic number," many Wall Street observers turned bearish. With DJ stocks yielding only 3.4 percent and price-earnings ratios nearing 19, the market appears overpriced to many on Wall Street.WALL STREET WATCH: In proportion received: "The broadening top is here. Not only is the party over, the Dow is headed for a 1,000-plus point fall." (California Technology Stock Letter) . . . "The stock market has gone about as high as it can for now without a pullback; some alarm bells are starting to ring."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | July 22, 1993
Stocks staged a late rally yesterday with the Dow Jones industrial average gaining 10.62 points to close at a record high of 3,555.40. The Dow is now 253 points, or 7.7 percent, above its Jan. 1, 1993, level.Just for comparison, on New Year's Day, 1991, the Dow stood at 2,633.66 and by Jan. 1, 1992, the popular indicator had reached 3,168.83. But before cheering, read on:WALL STREET WARNING: "If the stock market's rarefied atmosphere gives you the chills, these figures won't warm you up. Standard & Poor's 500-stock index fell 19 percent or more eight times since 1958 and five of those descents began with stocks yielding less than 3.1 percent.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 12, 1997
Today we answer readers' questions:DOLLAR DOINGS: "Does the recent strong dollar affect my stocks?"The dollar's ups and downs don't affect the whole market; certain groups benefit while others falter.The strong dollar, which last week hit a four-year high against the Japanese yen, helps retailers like Circuit City, Dillards and Nordstrom that sell mostly in the United States but buy goods abroad.Yet the rising dollar is most harmful to "multinational" firms that are big exporters, like Microsoft, Compaq Computer, Novell, Warner-Lambert and Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | January 26, 1995
Stocks spent much of yesterday on the rise, climbing more than 28 points before sliding in the last hour of trading. The Dow Jones industrial average closed up 8.75 points to close at 3,871.45. Compaq Computer Corp. put a shudder through the market, and other technology stocks, by announcing that its profit growth in the first quarter would slow.LOOKING BACK: "I sure hope the Republicans are able to cut the capital gains tax, but I'm not sure how that would affectstocks. Looking back, we find that one month after the 1978 tax cut was enacted the Dow had lost 12 percent and the OTC was off 18 percent.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | July 28, 1994
After bond prices fell yesterday following June's strong durable goods report, stocks declined in moderate trading. The Dow Jones industrial average dipped 15.21 points, closing at 3,720.47. The 30-year government bond slipped 1/2 point to yield 7.60 percent, and the Treasury's 5-year note auction brought investors 6.95 percent, the note's highest return since 1991.AND NOW WHERE? August in Wall Street has historically been a moderately "up" month, rising an average 0.2 percent over the last 43 years . . . "I'm negative because interest rates will rise soon and stocks are basically overvalued.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | March 31, 1994
Waves of selling struck Wall Street again yesterday, driving the Dow Jones industrial average down 72.27 points to finish at 3,626.75, its lowest close since November. Officials imposed "computerized program trading curbs" twice during the gloomy session.With just today to go before the first quarter ends, the Dow is down 127 points, or 3.4 percent, from the beginning of the year.So, with stock and bond markets tumbling, let's turn to lighter topics, including this little quiz:TEST YOUR MEMORY: Many local firms, past and present, have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars popularizing their slogans.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | January 6, 1994
Although interest rates turned higher yesterday -- usually a bad sign for stocks -- the Dow Jones industrial average forged ahead 14.92 points and closed at a record high. On extremely heavy volume of more than 375 million shares, the Dow indicator finished the busy session at 3,798.82, now ahead 490 points, or 15 percent, since this date last year.GOOD INDICATOR: "As January goes, so goes the year. Nothing beats this January Barometer. Since 1950, no other indicator has predicted the annual course of the market with such accuracy.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | July 22, 1993
Stocks staged a late rally yesterday with the Dow Jones industrial average gaining 10.62 points to close at a record high of 3,555.40. The Dow is now 253 points, or 7.7 percent, above its Jan. 1, 1993, level.Just for comparison, on New Year's Day, 1991, the Dow stood at 2,633.66 and by Jan. 1, 1992, the popular indicator had reached 3,168.83. But before cheering, read on:WALL STREET WARNING: "If the stock market's rarefied atmosphere gives you the chills, these figures won't warm you up. Standard & Poor's 500-stock index fell 19 percent or more eight times since 1958 and five of those descents began with stocks yielding less than 3.1 percent.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | March 31, 1994
Waves of selling struck Wall Street again yesterday, driving the Dow Jones industrial average down 72.27 points to finish at 3,626.75, its lowest close since November. Officials imposed "computerized program trading curbs" twice during the gloomy session.With just today to go before the first quarter ends, the Dow is down 127 points, or 3.4 percent, from the beginning of the year.So, with stock and bond markets tumbling, let's turn to lighter topics, including this little quiz:TEST YOUR MEMORY: Many local firms, past and present, have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars popularizing their slogans.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | July 28, 1994
After bond prices fell yesterday following June's strong durable goods report, stocks declined in moderate trading. The Dow Jones industrial average dipped 15.21 points, closing at 3,720.47. The 30-year government bond slipped 1/2 point to yield 7.60 percent, and the Treasury's 5-year note auction brought investors 6.95 percent, the note's highest return since 1991.AND NOW WHERE? August in Wall Street has historically been a moderately "up" month, rising an average 0.2 percent over the last 43 years . . . "I'm negative because interest rates will rise soon and stocks are basically overvalued.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 4, 1993
Encouraged by higher corporate earnings and lower interest rates, investors pushed the Dow Jones industrial average to its biggest one-day gain of the year yesterday on heavy volume of 345 million shares. The Dow surged 45.12 points, to 3,373.79, and now stands only 39.42 points below its record high of 3,413.21. Other popular indexes reached record peaks yesterday.WHAT THEY THINK: "This will be a tough market year although stocks will outperform bonds and bonds will outperform cash. I look for a 10-12 percent gain in stocks.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | September 10, 1992
In the wake of the lowest T-bill rates in 29 years, the Dow Jones average gained 11 points yesterday, closing at 3,271.39. The last time T-bill rates sank below 3 percent, in 1963, the Dow index hovered around the 750 level.TAKE YOUR CHOICE: "I'm not wild about stocks at this point. Buy intermediate-term bonds, 3-7 years." (Martin Zweig) . . . "With the economy still very rough it's surprising how resilient stocks are, but it's a good time to get in; some 1993 earnings will be quite strong."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.