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By Lou Cedrone | August 13, 1991
''Pure Luck'' is a remake of the 1985 French film, ''La Chevre'' in which Gerard Depardieu and Pierre Richard were the leads.Sometimes these French-to-American transformations work. Sometimes, they do not. This one, happily, does. It isn't the smartest, subtlest comedy we have seen, but if it is visual humor you cherish, there is plenty of that here.Martin Short is responsible for most of it. He plays a klutzy accountant, a man who pursues disaster. Danny Glover co-stars. He plays a detective.
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The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
"Wheel of Fortune" host and part-time Severna Park resident Pat Sajak is taking some heat for comments he made on social media about global warming. Sajak (@patsajak) , who got his start as a local TV weatherman in Nashville, according to IMDB, has drawn widespread attention for Twitter posts he made recently, including one posted yesterday that read: "I now believe global warming alarmists are unpatriotic racists knowingly misleading for their own ends. Good night. " Sajak was in town Sunday for an appearance by comedian Martin Short at the Maryland Hall for Creative Arts in Annapolis . Yesterday, he tweeted a photo of him and Short with a shout out to Rams Head.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 20, 1994
The second night of the official fall TV season brings with it one of the most anticipated, and tough, head-to-head battles of the year: NBC's "Frasier" vs. ABC's "Home Improvement." Tradition usually favors the incumbent, but this time there is no incumbent: Both shows have moved from other nights to face one another. "Frasier" is a better show -- but "Home Improvement" has the edge of being TV's highest-rated series last season. Let the battle begin.* "Baseball" (8-10 p.m., Channel 22) -- Inning 3, covering the years 1910-1920, culminates in one of major league baseball's sorriest episodes: the 1919 White Sox scandal, when gamblers bribed certain players to throw the World Series.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2005
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. - Tony Stewart, who drives the No. 20 Chevrolet for the Joe Gibbs team, has been described as his generation's A.J. Foyt. That means he is a great racer with a short temper. Yesterday, in the 47th annual Daytona 500, Stewart was both great and angry. He led 107 laps, more than anyone else. And even after Jeff Gordon and Kurt Busch had passed him for first and second, it looked as if he was headed for a solid, third-place finish. But things happen. Jimmie Johnson and his No. 48 Chevy happened.
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By Orange County Register | September 3, 1991
The question among Martin Short boosters was never if the comic actor's star would ascend and the rest of the world would discover what they've known all along. The question was when.Mr. Short's fans -- many of whom have followed him since his "SCTV" days, or perhaps discovered him on "Saturday Night Live" or one of his many television specials -- thought for sure that Mr. Short and Hollywood were a perfect match.Five films and five years later, they continue to wait for Mr. Short to take his place among the comic elite, who command seven-figure salaries and superstar status.
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By Stephen Wigler | August 9, 1991
"Pure Luck" is Martin Short's lousy luck.How anyone so funny on TV -- his Ed Grimley creation alone earns him a place in the comic Pantheon -- ends up in so many crummy flicks remains a mystery.But there's no secret why "Pure Luck's" a flop. It's an Americanization of the French film "Le Chevre" by Francis Veber, who has made a business of licensing his films to Hollywood. "The Toy," "The Tall Blond Man with One Red Shoe," and "Three Fugitives" were all crummy movies based on mediocre Veber orginals.
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By Chris Hewitt and Chris Hewitt,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 1, 1994
No matter how cute child stars such as Shirley Temple and the Olsen twins are, a lot of the time you just want to smack them.Something about the ease with which they summon phony emotions makes them seem inhuman -- we sense that many of these dimpled angels are really monsters. They're certainly ripe for being targets of satire, and the movie "Clifford" knows it. But the people who made this bizarre comedy didn't have the guts to follow through.The title character is an unusually smart, unusually rotten kid who is obsessed with visiting California's fictitious Dinosaurworld.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 19, 1992
Top Ten Reasons for Avoiding "Captain Ron."10.) Do the words lame, lamer and lamest mean anything to you?9.) Cute kids.8.) Martin Short in yet another throwaway part. Here's a horrifying sub-thought: Suppose this is all the Martin Short there is? Suppose for the rest of his career he plays mild suburban dads who find themselves mildly overmatched by circumstances, make a lot of funny noises but ultimately and sentimentally rally in the end. The movie would have been a lot funnier if he'd done everything just the same except . . . he was Ed Grimley.
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By Los Angeles Times | November 16, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- An odd couple is the name of the game in an upcoming buddy movie. In Universal's comedy "Pure Luck," Danny Glover and Martin Short team up to go looking for a missing woman known to be incredibly unlucky. As they retrace her steps, Glover hopes that Short, who is incredibly unlucky too, will stumble into the same pitfalls as the woman. The script derives from Francis Veber's French comedy, "La Chevre" ("The Goat").Meanwhile, C. Thomas Howell and Wallace Shawn make another odd pair of detectives in RCA-Columbia's "Nickel and Dime."
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By Lou Cedrone | December 23, 1991
Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett and Elizabeth Taylor did a much better ''Father of the Bride'' in 1950, but the new version, starring Steve Martin, Diane Keaton and Martin Short, has its laughs.The film's basic flaw is that it mixes high comedy with low comedy, and the melange doesn't quite work.Martin, doing the role originated by Tracy, plays the father of a 22-year-old girl who arrives home to announce that she is planning to marry a young man she has met in Rome.Dad is nonplused. This is his little girl.
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By David M. Graves and Jess Blumberg | October 24, 2002
A regal exhibit at the Walters The Middle Ages will be front and center when the Walters Art Museum opens The Book of Kings: Art, War, and the Morgan Library's Medieval Picture Bible. The exhibit, on display from Sunday through Dec. 29, highlights New York's Morgan Library's Picture Bible, which may have been commissioned by France's King Louis IX in the 13th century and which recounts great events of the Old Testament through vivid illustrations. Accompanying the Bible will be arms, armor, religious items and more from the Gothic period.
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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1997
As grown-ups watch Martin Short snuffle, snort and grimace in the opening moments of "A Simple Wish," they are likely to compose a fervent wish of their own: Please, oh please, get me through this movie!The kids may warm to Short's genial turn as a hapless fairy godmother. Their parents will find him ceaselessly irritating, like someone in the next lunch booth who sneezes through the entire meal. Short is capable of hysterical caricature. With luck, one day he'll find the right movie vehicle.
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 1997
NEW YORK -- Martin Short believes in summer vacation the way bears believe in hibernation. It's annual. It's his nature.The Canadian funnyman, in town to publicize his fairy-godmother turn in "A Simple Wish," which opens Friday, was whiling away the hours before he and his wife and three children head north for three months on a lake."
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 8, 1995
"Father of the Bride: Part II" is less a movie than a series of blackout sketches depicting how hard pregnancy is on men. It's about a guy about to become a father and a grandfather simultaneously, though not with the same woman, thank God.It helps enormously -- in fact it is the whole movie -- that the man in question is Steve Martin as we know and love him the best: loose-jointed, dithery, stumblingly vulnerable and silly, self-deluding, as close to an Everydad as anyone could imagine.The film follows on the 1991 success "Father of the Bride," which in turn traces its lineage back to the early '50s film with Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett and a youngster named Elizabeth Taylor.
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By Steven Cole Smith and Steven Cole Smith,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | July 19, 1995
From 1986 until his last season, Phil Hartman was the unsung hero of the beleaguered "Saturday Night Live."Sometimes, he felt on top of the world. "There were times when we would do a show in New York and I would say to myself, 'This is the center of the universe,' " he said. "No other show on television could claim that, say, Mel Gibson is hosting tonight, and Eric Clapton or Paul Simon are doing the music, and Jesse Jackson is making an appearance on 'Weekend Update.' There is no other show like that."
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 4, 1994
Talk about a Short run: "The Martin Short Show," after only three episodes on NBC, will not be seen tonight -- because the network already has yanked the show from its schedule and sent it back for retooling. Meanwhile, another struggling series, ABC's "My So-Called Life," gets a one-shot tryout in a later, better time slot, the one that, in seven days, will be occupied by the second-season premiere of "NYPD Blue."* "Frasier" (9-9:30 p.m., Channel 2) -- Frasier (Kelsey Grammer) sets up Daphne (Jane Leeves)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 8, 1995
"Father of the Bride: Part II" is less a movie than a series of blackout sketches depicting how hard pregnancy is on men. It's about a guy about to become a father and a grandfather simultaneously, though not with the same woman, thank God.It helps enormously -- in fact it is the whole movie -- that the man in question is Steve Martin as we know and love him the best: loose-jointed, dithery, stumblingly vulnerable and silly, self-deluding, as close to an Everydad as anyone could imagine.The film follows on the 1991 success "Father of the Bride," which in turn traces its lineage back to the early '50s film with Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett and a youngster named Elizabeth Taylor.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 26, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Jerry Seinfeld was asked yesterday what he thought about the wave of stand-up comedians getting their own sitcoms."I'm against it," he said. "I think it should be all Shakespearean actors doing sitcoms."But there's nothing new about it. Abbott and Costello did it. Every comedian that's been used in television, they try to create a show around him. So, there's nothing new about it."Seinfeld met with critics here yesterday to promote "Abbott & Costello Meet Jerry Seinfeld," a retrospective of clips from the classic comedy team with Seinfeld as host, which will air on NBC in November.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 20, 1994
The second night of the official fall TV season brings with it one of the most anticipated, and tough, head-to-head battles of the year: NBC's "Frasier" vs. ABC's "Home Improvement." Tradition usually favors the incumbent, but this time there is no incumbent: Both shows have moved from other nights to face one another. "Frasier" is a better show -- but "Home Improvement" has the edge of being TV's highest-rated series last season. Let the battle begin.* "Baseball" (8-10 p.m., Channel 22) -- Inning 3, covering the years 1910-1920, culminates in one of major league baseball's sorriest episodes: the 1919 White Sox scandal, when gamblers bribed certain players to throw the World Series.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 26, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Jerry Seinfeld was asked yesterday what he thought about the wave of stand-up comedians getting their own sitcoms."I'm against it," he said. "I think it should be all Shakespearean actors doing sitcoms."But there's nothing new about it. Abbott and Costello did it. Every comedian that's been used in television, they try to create a show around him. So, there's nothing new about it."Seinfeld met with critics here yesterday to promote "Abbott & Costello Meet Jerry Seinfeld," a retrospective of clips from the classic comedy team with Seinfeld as host, which will air on NBC in November.
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