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By Drew Jubera and Drew Jubera,Cox News Service | October 9, 1993
Turner Pictures' $20-million "Gettysburg," which opened at theaters nationwide yesterday, is as close to moguldom as Ted Turner can get. For now, at least.It's his "Birth of a Nation" meets "Ran": a four-hour plus adaptation of "The Killer Angels," the 1975 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Michael Shaara about the men behind one of the bloodiest battles in U.S. history. It has an all-star, all-guy cast that includes Martin Sheen (Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee), Tom Berenger (Confederate Lt. Gen. James Longstreet)
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February 17, 2009
Series American Idol:: Twelve semifinalists perform. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) The Mentalist:: A country club's queen bee is fatally poisoned during a cocktail party at her home, and Patrick (Simon Baker) and the team dig up all kinds of unsavory information about the community. (9 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Frontline: : Inside the Meltdown: : This Frontline documents factors that led to the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. (9 p.m., WETA-Channel 26) Law & Order: Special Victims Unit:: Benson and Stabler (Mariska Hargitay, Christopher Meloni)
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By Los Angeles Times | November 23, 1990
Martin Sheen has signed to star in two films for writer-director Clyde Ware's Ashby Productions.In "Rough Diamond," Sheen will star as an ex-high school football hero now working in the West Virginia coal mines. When insurance won't pay for his wife's dental bills, he considers robbing a mine payroll. In "Cass," inspired by Nicholas Ray's 1950 classic "In a Lonely Place," Sheen is a Hollywood film maker whose reputation for violence and womanizing makes him a murder suspect. Ware plans to begin production on one of the films by the first of April.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | December 15, 2006
An archival print of Apocalypse Now Redux - in fact, director Francis Ford Coppola's own print of Apocalypse Now Redux - will be shown this weekend at the American Film Institute's Silver Theatre, 8633 Colesville Road in Silver Spring, part of a Coppola retrospective running through Jan. 11. When it was released in 1979, the original Apocalypse Now won the grand prize at Cannes and was hailed in most quarters as a masterpiece, a dense, hallucinatory boat...
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 23, 2006
Where were you on that terrible June night when Robert Kennedy was assassinated? More importantly, what did you think after you heard about it? Bobby is a lament of what might have been. It is not a history lesson; those looking to explore the events of June 5-6, 1968, should look elsewhere. It does not offer insight into the mind of his assassin, Sirhan Sirhan, or touch upon the myriad conspiracy theories that since have arisen. It does not delve into RFK the man, or look at the political climate or examine the times in which he lived.
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By Lou Cedrone | February 18, 1991
''Cadence'' is a small, sketchy little movie, with more faults than you can count. Despite its shortcomings, however, the new film is most effective, even moving at times.Charlie Sheen stars. His father, Martin Sheen, co-stars and served as director. Sheen was to direct from the start, then took over the co-starring role when Gary Busey had to withdraw from the cast.The film brings many others to mind, among them, ''A Soldier's Story,'' ''From Here to Eternity,'' ''The Caine Mutiny Court Martial,'' ''Bridge on the River Kwai'' and the more recent ''Full Metal Jacket.
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By Knight-Ridder | March 2, 1991
Though he was only on the screen for a matter of seconds, the most important film role he ever had was in "Apocalypse Now," says Scott Glenn.That's surprising, considering that Glenn has worked in dozens of movies since, including "The Right Stuff," "The Hunt for Red October," the current "The Silence of the Lambs" and "My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys" (which opened nationally yesterday but has not yet opened in Baltimore)."What I got out of that film ["Apocalypse"] was a sense of self-confidence in myself as an actor," Mr. Glenn says.
NEWS
February 17, 2009
Series American Idol:: Twelve semifinalists perform. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) The Mentalist:: A country club's queen bee is fatally poisoned during a cocktail party at her home, and Patrick (Simon Baker) and the team dig up all kinds of unsavory information about the community. (9 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Frontline: : Inside the Meltdown: : This Frontline documents factors that led to the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. (9 p.m., WETA-Channel 26) Law & Order: Special Victims Unit:: Benson and Stabler (Mariska Hargitay, Christopher Meloni)
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | August 18, 1992
A Croatian-American musician wants to know why the music industry, which cared about African starvation, apartheid and AIDS, doesn't seem to care that his homeland has become a killing ground.Nenad Bach has put $15,000 of his own money, along with donated time, material and services, into a multi-star "We Are the World"-style song and video called "Can We Go Higher?" But he can't persuade any major recording label to distribute it.The main purpose of the video is to call for peace and to raise awareness of the Yugoslavian conflict, with proceeds going to war orphans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney | October 4, 1991
CADENCE'Republic Pictures Home Video$92.98"Cadence," consistently enjoyable in its mix of drama and comedy, is the antithesis of blockbuster. It's a small-budget project, set primarily in an Army stockade, and care is paid to elements like character development and believable story line -- instead of battle scenes and bombing runs.The setting is Europe, during the early days of the Vietnam War. Charlie Sheen plays a no-good American teen named Bean, who finds himself in the Army, though he seems more destined for jail.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | November 23, 2006
Where were you on that terrible June night when Robert Kennedy was assassinated? More importantly, what did you think after you heard about it? Bobby is a lament of what might have been. It is not a history lesson; those looking to explore the events of June 5-6, 1968, should look elsewhere. It does not offer insight into the mind of his assassin, Sirhan Sirhan, or touch upon the myriad conspiracy theories that since have arisen. It does not delve into RFK the man, or look at the political climate or examine the times in which he lived.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 23, 2006
THE END OF THE TV SEASON begins this week and that means a certain kind of madness soon will descend upon our television screens. Beloved characters will die and story lines will take bizarre turns. Familiar casting lineups will be disrupted and long-time series shot down. A new online venture, which could transform the future of TV, will be launched. And it will seem as if there are new episodes of American Idol and Deal or No Deal airing every night of every week. May sweeps -- a 28-night programming blitz that marks the end of the network season and determines advertising rates (via audience measurements in 210 cities)
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - Let us spend a few moments contemplating naked chicks. Naked Dixie Chicks, to be exact, meaning the country music trio from Texas whose Natalie Maines has become more famous for something she said than for anything she ever sang. If you're not familiar with what she said, well ... Welcome back. And how are things on Antarctica? Not as cold, I would wager, as they have been for the Chicks ever since they came out against the war in Iraq in March. Specifically, Ms. Maines told a London audience, "We're ashamed that the president of the United States is from Texas."
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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2002
There was no Secret Service, no limousine, no blockaded streets. The official seal was nowhere in sight, nor were toadying aides. He crept in, in fact, after the show had begun, slipped silently into his front-row seat and, fingers steepled, watched the kids onstage, absorbed. This was like no president who ever came to Baltimore. Well, to be technical, he's not a Commander-in-Chief: He's an actor who plays one on TV. But by any measure - Nielsens, Emmy Awards, critical raves - Martin Sheen's popularity ratings are high across the land.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 14, 2001
The shards of Apocalypse Now embedded in the thrilling behind-the-scenes chronicle Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse are more vivid and cohesive than they were in Francis Coppola's movie. This movie is a milestone. It's the closest celluloid equivalent to Lillian Ross' book Picture (about the making of John Huston's The Red Badge of Courage) or Pauline Kael's long article on the making of Sidney Lumet's The Group, or Julie Salamon's chronicle of Bonfire of the Vanities as viewed by Brian De Palma, The Devil's Candy.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 23, 2001
LOS ANGELES - The Aaron Sorkin Public Apology Tour made two stops over the weekend at the Television Critics Summer Press Tour. With a publicist at his side, Sorkin was trying to do damage control - just like the Washington politicians he so skillfully depicts each week on NBC's The West Wing. His first stop was Friday night at the NBC "All-Star Party" for new fall shows held in the swank Horseshoe Gardens of the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Pasadena where he was mobbed by reporters. For those who haven't followed this year's most widely reported TV-Celebrity-Who-Got-in-Drug-Trouble-on-Hiatus story, Sorkin was arrested April 15 at the Burbank Airport for having cocaine, marijuana and hallucinogenic mushrooms in a carry-on bag. He's now in a court-ordered, 20-week counseling program that if completed will wipe the conviction off his record.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1997
"Spawn" has soul, even if it is firmly ensconced in the depths of hell.A live-action adaptation of Todd McFarlane's incredibly popular comic book, "Spawn" rocks with the sort of style, creativity and exuberance other top-heavy, lumbering comic-book adaptations -- are you listening, "Batman and Robin"? -- can only dream of.Spawn, the title character, was once CIA operative Al Simmons, who went along merrily destroying people and governments (thus earning his place in hell) until a bad thing happened: Al developed a conscience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 15, 1991
'Cadence'Starring Charlie Sheen and Martin Sheen.Directed by Martin Sheen.Released by Republic Pictures.Rated PG-13.... ** If "Cadence" weren't so entertaining, it would be a lot easier dismiss.Fundamentally, it's the kind of naive-liberal pipe dream of the '50s, a sort of politically correct combination of "Billy Budd" and "The Defiant Ones" that, however well-intentioned, ends up telling us that the point of unjustly imprisoned black people is to improve young white people. Charlie Sheen plays a young soldier stationed in West Germany in 1965.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 17, 2000
LOS ANGELES - Aaron Sorkin's White House drama "West Wing," the most critically acclaimed series on network television, goes back into production here today for its second season, and Sorkin promises that its first order of business will be addressing last year's controversial finale. In answer to a series of questions from critics about closing the season with an unresolved assassination attempt on President Bartlett (Martin Sheen) after a town hall meeting, Sorkin said, "I know that many of you were troubled by it, thinking that the cliff-hangerness of it all was, perhaps, a step down from what you expected.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1997
"Spawn" has soul, even if it is firmly ensconced in the depths of hell.A live-action adaptation of Todd McFarlane's incredibly popular comic book, "Spawn" rocks with the sort of style, creativity and exuberance other top-heavy, lumbering comic-book adaptations -- are you listening, "Batman and Robin"? -- can only dream of.Spawn, the title character, was once CIA operative Al Simmons, who went along merrily destroying people and governments (thus earning his place in hell) until a bad thing happened: Al developed a conscience.
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