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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
I don't have time for a full review, but I do want to alert viewers to the premiere tonight on HBO of director Martin Scorsese's "George Harrison: Living in the Material World. " This is one of the most ambitious and daring biographical films that I have ever seen on TV. I am not a big Beatles fan. And of the Beatles, Harrison was my least favorite. But Scorsese helped me understand, appreciate and ultimately care more than I expected to for Harrison and the challenging journey the guitarist chose to make of his life.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
I don't have time for a full review, but I do want to alert viewers to the premiere tonight on HBO of director Martin Scorsese's "George Harrison: Living in the Material World. " This is one of the most ambitious and daring biographical films that I have ever seen on TV. I am not a big Beatles fan. And of the Beatles, Harrison was my least favorite. But Scorsese helped me understand, appreciate and ultimately care more than I expected to for Harrison and the challenging journey the guitarist chose to make of his life.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
Director Martin Scorsese joins a pantheon of movie greats, stretching from John Ford, Lillian Gish and Alfred Hitchcock to Steven Spielberg, Elizabeth Taylor and Jack Nicholson, when he becomes the 25th recipient of the American Film Institute's Lifetime Achievement Award, tonight on CBS."Grace Under Fire" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- In a repeat from November, Grace and daughter Libby (Kaitlin Cullum) go to New York, where Libby's growing fascination with boys could threaten her performance in a national poetry contest.
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
If you love hearing Martin Scorsese talk movies, don't miss "Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff. " Craig McCall's tip-top documentary centers on the cinematographer who turned Technicolor into an incomparably vivid and fluid palette with movies like "Pandora and the Flying Dutchman" and "The Barefoot Contessa. " (It plays at the AFI Silver at 2:45 p.m. Saturday and 8 p.m. Monday.) No one is more passionate than Scorsese at paying tribute to fellow artists like Cardiff and his most influential collaborators, the writing-directing-producing team of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (aka "the Archers")
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 15, 1991
Meet feral man. He's a tattoo museum and his eyes glint with pathological cunning. He has done graduate work at the University of the Joint, where he studied rape from a variety of perspectives.At that august institution he also had his last vestiges of humanity removed while acquiring a useful knowledge of the law, physical fitness and close-quarters combat. He's very tough. He's very dangerous. But worst of all, he's very smart.And who is the natural prey of feral man? Why, it's rational man, in his crisp seersuckers and his starchy shirts.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | February 26, 2007
HOLLYWOOD -- Martin Scorsese finally felt the love last night from the film industry, as his mob drama, The Departed, was named best picture and he was named best director. "Could you double-check the envelope?" Scorsese joked after being presented the directing Oscar by a heavyweight trio of his directing peers, Steven Spielberg, George Lucas and Francis Ford Coppola. Scorsese, who had come up short on five previous directing nominations, received a standing ovation from the crowd at the 79th annual Academy Awards at the Kodak Theatre.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 24, 2004
If you didn't know that Martin Scorsese made The Aviator, the enthralling new adventure-biography of Howard Hughes, you might think it was the calling card of a neophyte visual genius. During the movie's daredevil aviation scenes, the combination of digital effects and old-fashioned Hollywood know-how takes audiences to a new Mount Olympus of period moviemaking. When the 21-year-old Hughes, played by Leonardo DiCaprio, grabs a camera and helps photograph his production of Hell's Angels (1930)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 6, 2006
Set in the lower depths and shiny high-rises of a Boston where the church lacks the moral stature to control bingo, The Departed tells a tale of the bad luck of the Irish with black humor, zest and cumulative kapow that take off the top of your head. With The Departed, Martin Scorsese and his screenwriter, William Monahan, have turned the Hong Kong thriller Infernal Affairs into a low-down and majestic cops-and-crooks epic. Far better than Mystic River, it brings to the screen the compass-less Beantown of deteriorating parishes and drifting good-bad guys.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 22, 1995
Martin Scorsese's new and sensational "Casino" comes from a script written by the director and screenwriter-author-journalist Nicholas Pileggi, but it's hard to believe another name doesn't belong somewhere in the credits: John Milton.Yes, that John Milton, the original Uncle Miltie of English lit. For "Casino" is really "Paradise Lost" Vegas-style, a study of monumental and character-driven folly. Its majestic chronicle tracks two men who inherited the Garden of Eden and managed in a very short time to destroy everything for no more cogent reason than their own bitter and unmalleable pride, which goeth before the fall every darn time.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 28, 2003
But if you was to ask me How de blues they come to be, Says if you was to ask me How de blues they come to be - You wouldn't need to ask me: Just look at me and see! - Langston Hughes It's the funkiness of life electrified in the notes on a guitar. It's the weariness of the daily grind distilled in the ache of a human voice. Over the years, some have embellished the blues with different flavors - horns, strings and things. But you really don't need all of that to feel the blues. The nuances are complex, but what resonates at the core is straight-up and real - a penetration into the soul, a cracked mirror held up to reality.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 4, 2008
Shine a Light has two maestros, Martin Scorsese and Mick Jagger, and once they begin to mesh, around the third or fourth song, they put on a display of showmanship that erases the line between art and entertainment. The great rock and roll bands of the 1960s and 1970s did so much to define popular culture and youth culture that pundits and critics tend to burden the few survivors with unfair questions. Have they reinvented themselves? Can they embody rebellion and effrontery as middle-aged or old men?
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 2, 2007
What's heartening about movies like Stephen Frears' The Queen and Martin Scorsese's The Departed is their bench strength. Helen Mirren and Michael Sheen were wonderful in The Queen, but so were their court and cabinet. An array of crack character actors supports the top names in The Departed. So it's infuriating to see directors Joel Schumacher of The Number 23 and Walt Becker of Wild Hogs trash their casts. In The Number 23, Mark Pellegrino (of Capote) and Ed Lauter (who's been doing super work since The Last American Hero in 1973)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | February 26, 2007
HOLLYWOOD -- Martin Scorsese finally felt the love last night from the film industry, as his mob drama, The Departed, was named best picture and he was named best director. "Could you double-check the envelope?" Scorsese joked after being presented the directing Oscar by a heavyweight trio of his directing peers, Steven Spielberg, George Lucas and Francis Ford Coppola. Scorsese, who had come up short on five previous directing nominations, received a standing ovation from the crowd at the 79th annual Academy Awards at the Kodak Theatre.
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By Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach and Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critics | December 1, 2006
Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach unless noted. Full reviews at baltimoresun.com/movies. Babel, -- in which director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu suggests that the world's peoples do a lousy job of talking to one another, doesn't devolve into babble, but it comes perilously close. Inarritu employs multiple story threads that unfold with little regard to chronology, but the device seems arbitrary and unnecessary. The film comes across as more clever than profound. (C.K.) R 142 minutes B- Bobby -- a star-studded fictional account of what 22 disparate people were doing at the Ambassador Hotel the day Robert Kennedy was assassinated, is a lament of what might have been.
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By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | March 8, 1998
Yes, Madonna has once again nabbed the cover of Vanity Fair, with a new promotional spin that features a pair of old staples -- motherhood and spiritual awakening. But the top cat of the March issue is an eerily photogenic creature named Jocelyne Wildenstein, who has recently been plastered all over New York, People, and other glossy magazines.Wildenstein is a walking argument against plastic surgery, with a face that has been manipulated into something rubbery and non-human, a tight, haughty, feline mask.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 1, 2003
NEW YORK - The most exciting aspect of Martin Scorsese's Gangs of New York is its vision of mid-19th century New York as a crucible, not a melting pot, for recent Irish immigrants and Manhattan "natives." It sets a fierce tone from the start, when Irish clad in red-striped pants and Nativists in blue sashes and stovepipe hats face off, then battle for control of the neighborhood known as Five Points. Broad and original as this vision is, it's also a double-barreled throwback. First, to the history recalled in Herbert Asbury's 1928 book of the same name.
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