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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | November 6, 1993
For the second time in little more than a year, production workers at Martin Marietta Corp.'s Middle River complex are being asked to accept wage and benefit concessions the company says are needed to safeguard jobs.The concessions are included in what was described as the "last and final" contract offer from Martin Marietta. The contract would cover union workers at its plants in Maryland, Denver and Orlando, Fla.Kenneth Miles, bargaining chairman for Local 738 of the United Auto Workers, which represents about 400 hourly workers at the Baltimore County complex, said yesterday that the union will recommend that its members reject the company's proposal, setting the stage for a possible strike.
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BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | October 29, 1990
In the mid-1970s, Jar-Mo Chen, then-head of physics at Martin Marietta Laboratories, invited the physics department of the University of Maryland Baltimore County to visit the lab to discuss ways the two neighbors might work together.It was a short conversation.Though one UMBC professor did wind up working part time at Martin's lab for two or three years after that, a partnership never materialized. UMBC's staff just wasn't interested, Dr. Chen recalls."There was no good fit and . . . there was no initiative from the school to cultivate that," he says.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Paul C. Ergler Sr., a retired Martin-Marietta Corp. aeronautical engineer who later became a professor of business management at what is now Loyola University Maryland, died Sunday of cardiac arrest at Oak Crest Village. The longtime Glen Arm resident was 92. Born in Pittsburgh and raised in Upper Darby, Pa., Dr. Ergler was a 1937 graduate of Upper Darby High School. He attended Drexel University in Philadelphia, where as a co-op student he earned a bachelor's degree in 1942 in aeronautical engineering.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | May 24, 1993
Peace activists capped a Catonsville Nine reunion weekend by spattering the entrance of Martin Marietta Corp.'s Middle River defense plant with blood yesterday and holding a vigil on company property.Unlike their anti-war movement mentors a quarter-century ago -- two of whom provided yesterday's vigil with moral support -- the self-styled "Middle River Nine" found it difficult to get arrested immediately.One managed to get arrested at midafternoon on a trespassing charge by wandering away from the other demonstrators, and most of the others followed suit by ignoring a company official's request that they leave by 6 p.m., Baltimore County police said.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A Martin Marietta-Lockheed Group won't cut its $385 million offer for units of the LTV Corp. if Congress bars their sale to a team led by a French company for $450 million, Martin Marietta's chairman and CEO, Norman Augustine, said yesterday.Rumors have arisen that Martin Marietta-Lockheed would slash its price to $250 million if Congress blocked the sale of the defense company units to Thomson-CSF Inc., the head of the Bethesda-based company told the House Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Kim Clark and Ted Shelsby and Kim Clark,Staff Writers | October 1, 1993
BETHESDA -- Martin Marietta Corp. said yesterday that its Glen Burnie plant with 481 workers would be closed, as the local division becomes one of the casualties of peace in a corporatewide consolidation.The closing of the submarine warfare plant here was part of the company's decision to cut 11,000 employees nationwide this year as a result of Pentagon budget cuts and its acquisition of General Electric Corp.'s aerospace division last year, said Norman R. Augustine, Martin Marietta's chairman and chief executive.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Reporter | December 3, 2006
Charles M. Rock Sr., a longtime administrator at Martin Marietta Corp. who helped build bombers during World War II, died of leukemia Nov. 26 at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 90 and lived in Towson. Starting out as an aviation mechanic at Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River, Mr. Rock devoted more than four decades to the business of building airplanes, moving around the country to work for the firm's offices in California, Alabama, Colorado, Louisiana, Florida and Rockville.
BUSINESS
By BILL ATKINSON and BILL ATKINSON,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
Seven people, including two former employees of the Grumman Corp., who allegedly made illegal trades based on insider information while the company was in merger negotiations with Bethesda-based Martin Marietta Corp., have agreed to pay nearly $300,000 to settle a complaint filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission.The complaint, filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, claims Grumman employees Nicholas Croce and his brother, Frank, and the other five defendants who were not Grumman employees used and passed information to a handful of family members and friends who made illegal trades on the company's stock.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | February 18, 2008
Laurence J. Adams, a McDaniel College honorary trustee and a retired engineer who once helped run one of the nation's largest aerospace corporations, died Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The 86-year-old Potomac resident died of complications of pneumonia. The son of a farmer, Mr. Adams was born and raised in Madelia, Minn., and graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1948 with a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering. It was during college that Mr. Adams met Marguerite "Peggy" Gaetz, who would become his wife.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1994
Grumman Corp. accepted Northrop Corp.'s $2.17 billion merger offer yesterday, capping a monthlong takeover battle and ending Martin Marietta Corp.'s attempts to buy the Bethpage, N.Y.-based defense contractor.Northrop won the bidding with an offer of $62 a share, beating Martin Marietta's bid of $55 a share.Grumman's announcement that it has entered into a merger agreement with Northrop ended a wild month during which takeover stock traders sensed a bloody bidding war and sent Grumman's stock soaring.
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