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By Michael Pakenham | October 19, 2003
Just coming on the U.S. market is the latest novel by Martin Amis -- his 12th work of fiction -- Yellow Dog (Miramax, 352 pages, $24.95). It is raucously funny, relentlessly fast-paced, delightfully intricate in its internal plays on the best traditions of 18th and 19th century fiction -- and, finally, a deeply moving novel of seriousness and important values. Xan (from Alexander) Meo, a 47-year-old writer, television personality and actor, is married to a woman named Russia. They are adoring parents of 4-year-old Billie and infant Sophie.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 19, 2003
Just coming on the U.S. market is the latest novel by Martin Amis -- his 12th work of fiction -- Yellow Dog (Miramax, 352 pages, $24.95). It is raucously funny, relentlessly fast-paced, delightfully intricate in its internal plays on the best traditions of 18th and 19th century fiction -- and, finally, a deeply moving novel of seriousness and important values. Xan (from Alexander) Meo, a 47-year-old writer, television personality and actor, is married to a woman named Russia. They are adoring parents of 4-year-old Billie and infant Sophie.
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FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Martin Amis regrets everything about the information, but nothing about "The Information" -- except, perhaps, all the extraneous information, those miles of column inches about his personal life that had little to do with his book, and much to do with its subject, literary envy."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 14, 2002
I grew up among Red-diaper babies. The Depression dominated our parents' lives in the 1930s. City financiers had beggared everybody's neighbor's Aunt Nellie. Country bankers had taken away decent families' farms. The World War II alliance with the Soviet Union lionized "Uncle Joe." Stalin's face appeared with FDR's and Churchill's in heroic public displays. To call oneself a socialist was far from disreputable. During the war, lots of people, especially intellectuals and artists, proudly declared themselves communists.
NEWS
By Michiko Kakutani and Michiko Kakutani,The New York Times | May 7, 1995
"The Information," by Martin Amis. New York: Harmony Books. 374 pages. $24Once in a while in some artists' careers, there comes along a work that sums up all their preoccupations, all their technical innovations to date.By turns satirical and tender, funny and disturbing, "The Information" marks a giant leap forward in Amis' career. Here, in a tale of middle-aged angst and literary desperation, all the themes and stylistic experiments of Amis's earlier fiction come together in a symphonic whole.
NEWS
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,Special to the sun | February 8, 1998
"Night Train," by Martin Amis. Harmony Books. 175 pages. $20.In his sorrowful new novel, "Night Train," Martin Amis clears away the muck that normally chokes the police procedural novel. He doesn't distract with travelogue, romance, or stylishly gruesome details of slaughter. He makes a nod toward sex, and winks at the cop-world cliche of blunt racial slurs. But this book is really a stripped-down puzzle, narrated and solved by one of the genre's most charismatic leading ladies: Detective Mike Hoolihan.
FEATURES
By Michael Anft and Michael Anft,Special to The Sun | March 1, 1994
"Writing journalism," Martin Amis writes, "never feels like writing in the proper sense. It is essentially collaborative: both your subject and your audience are hopelessly specific."And hopelessly limited further, he might have added, by time and geography. Nothing is more ephemeral, more dispensable then a newspaper story -- with magazine pieces coming in a close second.Even the best-considered write- up from 15 years ago is destined not for the scrap heap of history, but for post-modernism's mountain of artifacts -- few of which will even be recalled and used for condescending, ironic conflation.
NEWS
By Sherri Kimmel Diegel | June 15, 1992
TIME'S ARROW: OR THE NATURE OF THE OFFENSE. By Martin Amis. Harmony Books. 167 pages. $18. MARTIN AMIS, in his seventh novel, once again examines the moral bankruptcy of modern society in clever, shocking prose. Instead of taking on the prospect of nuclear holocaust as he did in 1989's "London Fields," in "Time's Arrow" he holds his smoky, satirical mirror up to the perpetrators of the Holocaust. The niggling thought is this: Does such a novel treatment dignify the solemn subject matter?Told in backward time, from the death of the protagonist in New England to the wastelands of his preconsciousness in Solingen, Germany, "Time's Arrow" relates the downward spiral toward Auschwitz of a Nazi doctor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 14, 2002
I grew up among Red-diaper babies. The Depression dominated our parents' lives in the 1930s. City financiers had beggared everybody's neighbor's Aunt Nellie. Country bankers had taken away decent families' farms. The World War II alliance with the Soviet Union lionized "Uncle Joe." Stalin's face appeared with FDR's and Churchill's in heroic public displays. To call oneself a socialist was far from disreputable. During the war, lots of people, especially intellectuals and artists, proudly declared themselves communists.
NEWS
By Ramsey Flynn | June 25, 1995
Of Love and Other Demons," by Gabriel Garcia Marquez is the book I'm most looking forward to reading this summer. I'm lately so steeped in the stuff of nonfiction that Marquez's brand of magical realism would be just what the doctor ordered. Then, "Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism," by John Shelby Spong. My current night-time habit, and oddly engrossing. I sometimes describe myself as a biblical Ressentialist. "The Information," by Martin Amis. I recently bought this one with the intent of using it as the first read in a monthly book club I'd like to start.
NEWS
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,Special to the sun | February 8, 1998
"Night Train," by Martin Amis. Harmony Books. 175 pages. $20.In his sorrowful new novel, "Night Train," Martin Amis clears away the muck that normally chokes the police procedural novel. He doesn't distract with travelogue, romance, or stylishly gruesome details of slaughter. He makes a nod toward sex, and winks at the cop-world cliche of blunt racial slurs. But this book is really a stripped-down puzzle, narrated and solved by one of the genre's most charismatic leading ladies: Detective Mike Hoolihan.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Martin Amis regrets everything about the information, but nothing about "The Information" -- except, perhaps, all the extraneous information, those miles of column inches about his personal life that had little to do with his book, and much to do with its subject, literary envy."
NEWS
By Michiko Kakutani and Michiko Kakutani,The New York Times | May 7, 1995
"The Information," by Martin Amis. New York: Harmony Books. 374 pages. $24Once in a while in some artists' careers, there comes along a work that sums up all their preoccupations, all their technical innovations to date.By turns satirical and tender, funny and disturbing, "The Information" marks a giant leap forward in Amis' career. Here, in a tale of middle-aged angst and literary desperation, all the themes and stylistic experiments of Amis's earlier fiction come together in a symphonic whole.
FEATURES
By Michael Anft and Michael Anft,Special to The Sun | March 1, 1994
"Writing journalism," Martin Amis writes, "never feels like writing in the proper sense. It is essentially collaborative: both your subject and your audience are hopelessly specific."And hopelessly limited further, he might have added, by time and geography. Nothing is more ephemeral, more dispensable then a newspaper story -- with magazine pieces coming in a close second.Even the best-considered write- up from 15 years ago is destined not for the scrap heap of history, but for post-modernism's mountain of artifacts -- few of which will even be recalled and used for condescending, ironic conflation.
NEWS
By Sherri Kimmel Diegel | June 15, 1992
TIME'S ARROW: OR THE NATURE OF THE OFFENSE. By Martin Amis. Harmony Books. 167 pages. $18. MARTIN AMIS, in his seventh novel, once again examines the moral bankruptcy of modern society in clever, shocking prose. Instead of taking on the prospect of nuclear holocaust as he did in 1989's "London Fields," in "Time's Arrow" he holds his smoky, satirical mirror up to the perpetrators of the Holocaust. The niggling thought is this: Does such a novel treatment dignify the solemn subject matter?Told in backward time, from the death of the protagonist in New England to the wastelands of his preconsciousness in Solingen, Germany, "Time's Arrow" relates the downward spiral toward Auschwitz of a Nazi doctor.
NEWS
By Paul Lukacs | July 9, 1995
Right now I'm re-reading Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." I'm again struck by how profoundly it speaks to what it means to be an American, and I recommend it to anyone who hasn't read or re-read it recently. Because life in the summer is a little less hectic than in the school year, I do try to read just for fun. I find that I never have enough time to get to half of what I want, but here are a few books that are high on my list: "London Fields" by Martin Amis, because my wife, who is a voracious reader, tells me it's a lot of fun; "Starcarbon," the latest novel by Ellen Gilchrist, because a vacation at the beach seems incomplete without a book by Ellen Gilchrist; and "Home Cooking" by the late Laurie Colwin, who is both sensible and sensitive when writing about food, and whose prose makes me laugh, cry and feel hungry all at the same time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,Sun Staff | February 28, 1999
You can't judge a book by its cover, but you still might make the kind of snap decision that will lead you to buy it.That's the thinking of publishers, who see every one of a book cover's components -- title, design, blurbs from critics and other writers -- as marketing tools. Nothing happens by accident on the cover of a book, not even the author's biography. (Granted, many author photos appear to have happened by accident, but that's a topic for another day.)The author bio presents an obvious problem for first novelists: They have no track record.
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