Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMartial Law
IN THE NEWS

Martial Law

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 14, 1992
Two weeks ago, when the Baltimore NAACP held a planning session prior to its "anti-crime meeting," some board members did not show up. Now those members are among frantic callers trying to find out what the civil rights group meant by proposing martial law to end city street violence."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Benjamin Todd Jealous claims that Maryland "would have seceded from the Union in 1861 if not for Abraham Lincoln's last-minute decision to impose martial law and arrest 12 members of the General Assembly to prevent them from taking a vote" ( "Maryland: the new South," April 13). Neither claim is accurate. President Lincoln never imposed martial law in Maryland (nor did anyone else) and he specifically instructed the military authorities to allow the Maryland legislature to meet in special session in April 1861 without interference.
Advertisement
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | July 29, 1992
There are plenty of signs that Baltimore street violence is out of control: higher crime rates, clogged court dockets, bystander shootings that have become almost routine. But none is more startling than the idea of the nation's largest civil rights organization calling for martial law in the inner city."We did it to get people's attention," said George N. Buntin Jr., executive director of the Baltimore chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. "We wanted to wake people up."
NEWS
By Benjamin Todd Jealous | April 12, 2014
It is a state that Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass both ran away from, a state that enslaved half its black population at the time of the Civil War. It is a state that would have seceded from the Union in 1861 if not for Abraham Lincoln's last-minute decision to impose martial law and arrest 12 members of the General Assembly to prevent them from taking a vote. Maryland is a Southern state, as it always has been. But you could forgive a young person today for believing that the Mason-Dixon Line begins just a little farther down Interstate 95. Indeed, modern Maryland has seen the most successful run of civil rights legislation of any state in recent history.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 28, 1991
KUWAIT CITY -- Kuwait's government extended military rule for another 30 days yesterday, one day after its crown prince denounced ongoing human rights abuses, including abduction and torture by well-armed vigilantes.Kuwait's emir, Sheik Jaber al-Ahmad al-Sabah, quietly extended the martial-law decree that has governed Kuwaitis since allied forces liberated their city three months ago. The 30-day extension was not announced publicly, and there were unconfirmed reports that the Cabinet had been divided over whether to continue martial law.The move came after an unusually blunt speech by Crown Prince Sheik Saad al-Abdullah al-Sabah, who is also prime minister and martial-law governor.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | October 27, 1993
Washington. -- I've been in just about every major city in the world, and I can't name one that I'd rather live in than the District of Columbia.This city has beautiful neighborhoods with verdant lawns graced by abundant trees and flowers, a marvelous park system, some of the greatest museums and monuments on earth. It has the marvelous Kennedy Center and other theaters; a great National Symphony Orchestra and a once-great football team, my Redskins; top-rank universities; magnificent cathedrals, temples, synagogues, churches and people who represent all the cultures of the world.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer Reporters James Bock and Frank D. Roylance contributed to this article | July 13, 1992
The Baltimore NAACP chapter is calling an "anti-crime meeting" for later this month to explore ways of better fighting criminal violence in the city, including discussing whether martial law might be appropriate.The meeting is to include community and religious leaders and families of recent murder victims, as well as the mayor, police commissioner, state's attorney and police district commanders.George N. Buntin Jr., executive director of the Baltimore chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said the group would offer several other proposals in addition to exploring the martial law idea.
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | July 26, 1991
WARSAW, Poland -- President Lech Walesa is warning that he would impose martial law if it were necessary to "save the country" from anarchy.Asked by the youth paper Sztandar Mlodych about reports of high-level discussions last week in Washington on a possible state of emergency in Poland, Mr. Walesa said he would fight for democracy, it was reported yesterday.But, he added, "If I have to deal with anarchy, widespread strikes, if the situation were to become dramatic, I would have to rely on force to save the country."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 26, 1999
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- While calm returned to Indonesia's capital yesterday after riots against the military left at least six people dead, students took to the streets of another large Indonesian city, hurling burning tires and rocks at soldiers and the police to protest a proposed law that would grant the army sweeping new powers.There were no immediate reports of injuries as a result of the riots yesterday in Medan, a city of 1.2 million on the island of Sumatra. But Indonesian news agencies reported fierce street clashes between nearly 2,000 student demonstrators and a joint force of soldiers and the police.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 27, 1992
BANGKOK, Thailand -- The government of Myanmar, formerly Burma, announced yesterday that it would lift the last of the martial-law decrees it imposed in 1989 to crush a nascent democracy movement.Diplomats described the action as primarily cosmetic and unlikely to satisfy critics of the government, although they acknowledged that it could result in a small improvement in the human rights situation in Myanmar.The move, which was announced on state radio, is the most recent in a series of changes that are apparently part of a strategy pursued by the military government to end its status as an international pariah.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | May 23, 2011
Ray Lewis made some interesting comments in a recent interview with ESPN's Sal Paolantonio, saying that crime will rise if the NFL season is canceled. Judging by initial reactions on the message boards, I’m guessing some of you would use a different adjective to describe the Ravens linebacker’s comments. “Do this research if we don't have a season -- watch how much evil, which we call crime, watch how much crime picks up, if you take away our game," Lewis said in the interview, which you can watch here . Lewis was referring to fans, but several of his peers have had brushes with the law during the lockout . "There's too many people that live through us, people live through us," he said.
NEWS
By Mubashir Zaidi and Laura King and Mubashir Zaidi and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 2, 2007
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- A suicide bomber struck a bus carrying air force personnel in central Pakistan yesterday, killing at least eight people, in the second such attack on a military target in three days. The bombing at an air base south of the capital, Islamabad, coincided with new fighting between government forces and Islamic militants in the Swat valley, a previously quiet area of northern Pakistan that has been roiled by violence in the past week. The growing unrest has heightened speculation that Pakistan's president, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, who is awaiting a Supreme Court ruling over whether his election in October to another term is valid, might declare emergency rule or martial law. The high court ruling was expected this week, but judges said yesterday that it would be put off until Nov. 12 -- just three days before Musharraf is scheduled to be inaugurated.
NEWS
June 24, 2007
(Editor's note: On June 21-22, 1972, Tropical Storm Agnes destroyed much of historic Ellicott City and areas of Elkridge. Much of Main Street in historic Ellicott City was underwater, the bridge over the Patapsco was severely damaged and the historic Ellicott House succumbed to the river. Most tragically, seven people drowned in the Patapsco.) As reported in the June 24, 1972, edition of The Sun: "That's a right evil stream," Omar J. Jones, the Howard county executive, said yesterday.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | May 17, 2007
Large swaths of Baltimore could be declared emergency areas subject to heightened police enforcement - including a lockdown of streets - under a city councilman's proposal that aims to slow the city's climbing homicide count. The legislation - which met with a lukewarm response from Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration yesterday, and which others likened to martial law - would allow police to close liquor stores and bars, limit the number of people on city sidewalks and halt traffic in areas declared "public safety act zones."
NEWS
By Karuna Buakamsri and John M. Glionna and Karuna Buakamsri and John M. Glionna,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2006
BANGKOK, Thailand -- Thai military forces launched a coup against Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra late yesterday, declaring martial law nationwide and seizing control of television stations as tanks and armed soldiers surrounded the prime minister's residence. Retired Lt. Gen. Prapart Sakuntanak, a spokesman for coup organizers, addressed a stunned nation on television, explaining that the revolt was necessary because Thaksin's government had divided the country and corruption was rampant.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 29, 2004
WASHINGTON - With a quick handover of political power, the United States passed the point of no return yesterday in its risky experiment of letting Iraqis develop the kind of country that the region and the world can live with. Unable to stabilize Iraq 14 months after toppling Saddam Hussein, the Bush administration has given public support and a large measure of independence to a new leadership in the hope that a visible Iraqi face on the government will curb the violence, analysts said, and will find it hard to reverse course.
NEWS
By Karuna Buakamsri and John M. Glionna and Karuna Buakamsri and John M. Glionna,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2006
BANGKOK, Thailand -- Thai military forces launched a coup against Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra late yesterday, declaring martial law nationwide and seizing control of television stations as tanks and armed soldiers surrounded the prime minister's residence. Retired Lt. Gen. Prapart Sakuntanak, a spokesman for coup organizers, addressed a stunned nation on television, explaining that the revolt was necessary because Thaksin's government had divided the country and corruption was rampant.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | May 17, 2007
Large swaths of Baltimore could be declared emergency areas subject to heightened police enforcement - including a lockdown of streets - under a city councilman's proposal that aims to slow the city's climbing homicide count. The legislation - which met with a lukewarm response from Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration yesterday, and which others likened to martial law - would allow police to close liquor stores and bars, limit the number of people on city sidewalks and halt traffic in areas declared "public safety act zones."
NEWS
June 27, 2004
GLIMMERS OF hope can be found amid the chaos preceding Wednesday's formal transfer of sovereignty in Iraq. Iraqi officials are already in charge of all 25 government ministries, running -- with the help of about 200 U.S. and British consultants -- a bureaucracy of more than a million workers. Iyad Allawi, the interim prime minister taking over from occupation leader L. Paul Bremer III, is presenting to his nation a face of amazing courage, refusing to be intimidated by the price on his head and the brutal violence around him. Most important, there is a palpable yearning among the Iraqi people for a free and stable society that gives reason to believe the journey their leaders are about to begin could eventually lead them there.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 2004
WASHINGTON - Three days from now, as political control in Iraq shifts from U.S. officials to an interim Iraqi government, the role of the American military will shift as well, officers and officials said. In what one senior officer termed a "modification rather than a new approach," there will be more of an emphasis on protecting the new Iraqi government's leaders and the country's infrastructure from the persistent and growing insurgency. As part of the shift, officials say, more political deals will be forged, similar to the ones hammered out in Fallujah and Najaf.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.