Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMartial Art
IN THE NEWS

Martial Art

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1994
Don't mess with Pasadena.That's the message a martial arts team from the Pasadena-based Kick Connection on Ritchie Highway will send as they compete in the Third World Eskrima, Kali, Arnis Championship in the Philippines Aug. 27 and 28.The team also will compete in the Eskrima, Kali, Arnis Invitational Championship on Aug. 20. The event also will be held in Manila.The all-male team of 10, ranging in age from 11 to 56, will defend the world champion title that a Kick Connection team won two years ago.This year's team, whose members come from Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Carroll and Baltimore counties, will join a California team to represent the United States against 20 other countries.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
In the world of the ninja, the Elrod family is an impressive force. Julie and Ron Elrod are black belts who travel to Japan annually to study their craft with Soke Hatsumi, the 34th-generation ninjutsu grandmaster. Their children, 21-year-old Kami and 24-year-old Wyatt, have followed in their footsteps, training with their parents. Experts in the art of self-defense, the Elrods are physically alert and sharp. They are not a family muggers would want to meet in a dark alley. Despite their physical prowess and skill with weapons, the Elrods are more welcoming than intimidating.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki | November 15, 1998
ALEX GRIFFITH, 5, loses his balance standing in line with his fellow students. He chews on his white belt, the symbol of beginner in the martial art of tae kwon do. And in the midst of a highly disciplined class, he breaks into song.Alex, alarmingly frail and sometimes lost in his own world, possesses the heart of a lion and is my new inspiration.At a decided crossroads in my 30 years of studying and teaching tae kwon do, a Korean martial art, Alex has also emerged as my new challenge. And he is a reminder that courage defies definition, that we learn as we teach.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 9, 2013
For an intense workout that requires strength, flexibility, technique and discipline, consider the Columbia Association's new mixed martial arts (MMA) classes. Classes in Brazilian jiu-jitsu and Muay Thai kickboxing began in February. Trainer Alvin Chan, who has a purple belt in Brazilian jiu-jitsu and is a former member of the World Kickboxing Association's U.S. Thai Boxing team, describes CA's foray into MMA as a “fun workout in a safe environment.” “It's the fastest growing sport in the world,” says Chan, a certified personal trainer who's worked for CA for 13 years and studied martial arts for 26 years.
NEWS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,Staff writer | June 21, 1991
Personal hand-to-hand combat is as old as man himself. People giftedwith discerning eyes for talent and skill to preserve life at all costs, learn by sheer necessity how to outthink, outmaneuver and outdo their adversaries in the course of a fight for survival of the fittest.-- Ciriaco C. CaneteGrandmaster of doce paresThe instructors at Kick Connection Inc. of Pasadena advise their students to run and hide if confronted by an aggressor."We tell them, 'If you're not in a corner, you canrun,' " said Leo Patalinghug, an assistant instructor at the 2-year-old academy.
SPORTS
By Neil Lippy and Neil Lippy,Contributing Writer | October 11, 1992
For a Hampstead couple, the martial art of tae kwon do is not only a family affair, but also a way of life.Joyce and Wayne Leppo took their daughter to a tae kwon do class some 17 years ago and have been in love with the sport and the lifestyle since."
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1996
Chung Koo Nam hopes to mine for Olympic gold at his martial arts center off Route 108 in east Columbia, and its companion center in Ellicott City.The tae kwon do master, who has been practicing the traditional Korean martial art since he was a child, is training American youngsters, some of whom he believes may be contenders when tae kwon do becomes an official Olympic sport four years from now.Nam has gained such a following that students from outside of...
SPORTS
By Matt Slovin and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
The Olympics are expanding and have been for decades. Ancient Olympians would hardly recognize the international competition for what it once was. While the slate of events for the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro is mostly set, the drawing board is full of possibilities for 2020. The host city hasn't yet been named for 2020 - it's between Istanbul, Tokyo and Madrid. Also yet to be determined is which sports, if any, will be added to the ever-growing list of events. Baseball certainly has a strong case to return.
FEATURES
By Taya Flores and Taya Flores,sun reporter | February 17, 2007
Sujal Bista moves across the gym floor in acrobatic spins and low leg sweeps and with loud hand claps. He lifts his 130-pound body off the ground and turns both legs for an aerial kick. Back on the gym floor four months after surgery for a torn Achilles tendon, he practices his moves at the University of Maryland, College Park until he is soaked in sweat and exhausted. "I'm going to do wushu until my body can't handle it anymore," the 25-year-old software engineer from Rockville says.
SPORTS
February 14, 2013
Another swing for softball Philip Hersh Chicago Tribune First of all, wrestling should not be replaced on the Summer Olympic program, in 2020 or ever. But if the International OlympicCommittee keeps its head buried firmly in the sand (or elsewhere), I am conflicted about a replacement because baseball and softball have made themselves a single entity in a bid for readmission. Softball belongs; baseball does not because the sport's top prize is not Olympic gold but the World Series, and getting its top players to compete during the major league season remains a problem.
EXPLORE
March 4, 2013
Mixed Martial Arts has come to Bel Air. Ground Control – Bel Air, an MMA training and fitness center, is celebrating its official grand opening and open house on Saturday, March 9 from 1 to 5 p.m. The new facility is at 305 S. Atwood in Bel Air. The afternoon will feature professional fighter seminars and training sessions, autographs sessions, local celebrities, select vendors, music, food and many give-away items, including tickets to an...
SPORTS
February 14, 2013
Another swing for softball Philip Hersh Chicago Tribune First of all, wrestling should not be replaced on the Summer Olympic program, in 2020 or ever. But if the International OlympicCommittee keeps its head buried firmly in the sand (or elsewhere), I am conflicted about a replacement because baseball and softball have made themselves a single entity in a bid for readmission. Softball belongs; baseball does not because the sport's top prize is not Olympic gold but the World Series, and getting its top players to compete during the major league season remains a problem.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Mixed martial arts fighter Darren Costa and his longtime friend Matthew Morrow were shot early Saturday at a house party in Pasadena as a wave of violence swept across the region. Morrow, 21, died from the wounds he suffered at the party in the 7000 block of Outing Ave.; Costa, 20, was taken to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Anne Arundel County Police did not name Costa as one of the victims, but his trainer Noel Smith, owner of a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu gym in Glen Burnie, confirmed Costa was injured at the party.
SPORTS
By Matt Slovin and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
The Olympics are expanding and have been for decades. Ancient Olympians would hardly recognize the international competition for what it once was. While the slate of events for the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro is mostly set, the drawing board is full of possibilities for 2020. The host city hasn't yet been named for 2020 - it's between Istanbul, Tokyo and Madrid. Also yet to be determined is which sports, if any, will be added to the ever-growing list of events. Baseball certainly has a strong case to return.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 27, 2010
Daniel Joseph Siegel, a rising junior at Yale University who taught martial arts to students and faculty, died on Saturday morning after a lengthy battle with brain cancer. He was 22. Mr. Siegel was born in Baltimore and graduated from Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School in Pikesville. A political science major at Yale, he excelled both inside and outside the classroom. He is the son of Janet Berg and Dr. Everett Siegel, a psychiatrist and assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV , john-john.williams@baltsun.com | December 6, 2009
Students at Jeffers Hill Elementary School will learn to develop active lifestyle skills as well as respect for themselves and others through a martial arts partnership that the school recently made official. Under the partnership, New Vision Martial Arts of Columbia will develop workshops that build students' skills in concentration, communication and nonviolent conflict resolution while improving their physical fitness; provide guest speakers during cultural events; and offer biannual self-defense workshops for the school staff.
NEWS
November 24, 1991
Will Maier, founder and chief instructor of United Martial Arts Academy of Columbia was the recipient of the national "Man of the Year Award" for his leadership and service to the martial arts community andindustry.The award was presented in Florida by the U.S. Martial Arts Association which has over 500 member schools in the United States and Canada.Maier received the "Retention Award" for the fourth consecutive year due to his rate of 92 percent.He also received the "Directors' Award" in recognition of his commitment to excellence in the pursuit of the martial arts.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1991
JELON VIEIRA -- dancer, master teacher -- finds that most people are ignorant when it comes to his native country."The only thing people know about Brazil is the bossa nova and the ladies and the bikinis," said Vieira. "Now I have to change the image."He's no missionary with boring books and dull lectures, but a choreographer who brings to life capoeira -- a dance full of spins, cartwheels, handstands and back flips. It looks like gymnastics until you see the artful dodges, the flying kicks and the quick footwork.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.