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November 24, 1991
Will Maier, founder and chief instructor of United Martial Arts Academy of Columbia was the recipient of the national "Man of the Year Award" for his leadership and service to the martial arts community andindustry.The award was presented in Florida by the U.S. Martial Arts Association which has over 500 member schools in the United States and Canada.Maier received the "Retention Award" for the fourth consecutive year due to his rate of 92 percent.He also received the "Directors' Award" in recognition of his commitment to excellence in the pursuit of the martial arts.
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NEWS
June 10, 2014
I served 24 years in the United States Army, 21 of them in Special Forces, and I fought in two combat campaigns, El Salvador and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Command Sgt. Major Dan Pitzer, a former prisoner of war in Vietnam and later a senior civilian instructor for the Army's SERE school was a close friend of mine. He shared many experiences with me about his four years as a captive of the Viet Cong. Unlike Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, Sergeant Pitzer did not "walk away" from his unit and actively seek refuge with the enemy ( "Bergdahl is free, but at what cost," June 9)
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NEWS
By SHERRY GRAHAM | July 12, 1994
A sign hanging in the International Tae Kwon Do Karate Academy in Eldersburg urges students to be humble, gentle, strong, honest, loyal and courteous. To always stand for justice and to respect and help one another.These attributes conflicted with my idea of tae kwon do and karate.But Master Bun Huor, owner and chief instructor at the academy, says there's no conflict.He noted the benefits of tae kwon do and karate. Besides teaching the skills of unarmed combat, he says, they provide physical conditioning while improving balance, flexibility, timing, general muscle tone and joint strength.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
WASHINGTON - Closing arguments are expected Thursday in the court-martial of a Naval Academy football player accused of sexually assaulting a fellow midshipman, after testimony Wednesday during which the alleged victim acknowledged initially withholding information from investigators and asking the defendant to lie. Midshipman Joshua Tate, a junior from Nashville, Tenn., is charged with aggravated sexual assault and three counts of making a...
NEWS
By KATHY SUTPHIN | September 9, 1994
Classes offered through the Mount Airy and Winfield recreation councils have proven to be a successful avenue of instruction for martial arts teacher Carl Minkel.Without the responsibilities and headaches associated with maintaining a facility for his Tae Kwon Do-Arnis Academy, Mr. Minkel said, he is free to focus on teaching.The Mount Airy resident, who has been teaching martial arts and self-defense locally since 1987, said his association with the recreation councils has worked out well.
NEWS
May 13, 2005
Services for Steven K. Frush Jr., a martial arts instructor and avid mountain biker, will be held at 1 p.m. today at the Lassahn Funeral Home, 7401 Belair Road. Mr. Frush, who was 24 and a Lutherville resident, died at Sinai Hospital on Sunday after being thrown from his motorcycle on Mays Chapel Road in Timonium. Mr. Frush was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville. He was a 1999 graduate of Dulaney High School and attended Essex Community College. A martial arts instructor for the past five years, he had been on the staff of Freedom Martial Arts in Bel Air since 2004.
SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,Contributing Writer | August 19, 1995
When international figure skating star Elvis Stojko steps into the limelight tomorrow at the Baltimore Arena, he won't be wearing skates.Nor will the two-time defending World Champion and Olympic silver medalist try to land any of his patented triple axels or quadruple toe loops.What Stojko will do is give his first public performance of his world-class martial arts, kicking off the opening ceremonies of the 1995 World Wushu-Kungfu Championships, which run today through Tuesday.Stojko, a dedicated student of the martial arts since the age of 10, is scheduled to perform his "martial arts to music" program at 11 a.m."
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Staff Writer | July 8, 1993
He has won a trophy that dwarfs him by more than 2 feet and a bike that he can't pedal because his legs aren't long enough. But that's commonplace for 4-foot-2, 58-pound Devin "Get Busy" Guy, a 6-year-old who is ranked No. 1 in the region for 12-year-olds and younger in Kata and fighting.Guy, who will enter the second grade at Robert Coleman Elementary in Baltimore this fall, rose to the top spot at the beginning of the year, and has won two grand championships, 106 trophies and two bikes in two years of competition.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1996
The first thing you notice when you walk into Michael Grogan's martial arts class in Catonsville is that everyone is wearing shoes.But that is not the only unusual aspect to Mr. Grogan's class. As a Christian, he shies away from the teachings of Eastern philosophy, and other martial arts customs."In a lot of the traditional Asian martial arts there are teachings of using one's inner powers and inner strengths that have some mystic connotations," said Mr. Grogan, who runs Sword of Heaven Martial Arts.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,Special to the Sun | August 17, 1994
Two days shy of his 83rd birthday, Brooks Bingham "Bing" Ford really is getting better.Three years ago, the Columbia resident marked his 80th year -- amid the fanfare of 300 spectators who had gathered at Howard High School -- by earning a first-degree black belt in martial arts.Mr. Ford is still kicking and punching -- with the same fervor of his younger classmates at Will Maier's United Martial Arts studio in Columbia -- toward a third-degree black belt that he hopes to attain on his 85th birthday.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
A former Naval Academy football player who is accused of sexually assaulting a fellow midshipman is moving toward a court-martial next month, officials said Tuesday. Jason Ehrenberg, a civilian attorney for Midshipman Joshua Tate, said the military judge in the case told prosecutors and defense attorneys this week that he planned to deny motions to dismiss the case. "We're going forward," Ehrenberg said. The judge, Marine Col. Daniel Daugherty, has not yet issued his rulings, and a Naval Academy spokesman said it would be improper to comment on a pending case.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Two former Naval Academy football players will stand trial early next year on charges that they sexually assaulted a classmate. Midshipman Eric Graham's court-martial is scheduled for Jan. 27 and Midshipman Joshua Tate's court-martial is scheduled for Feb. 10, according to Naval Academy officials. Graham, a senior at the academy from Eight Mile, Ala., is charged with abusive sexual contact, and Tate, a junior from Nashville, Tenn., is charged with aggravated sexual assault. Both are charged with making false official statements.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
The superintendent of the Naval Academy has referred two former members of the Navy football team to a court-martial on charges that they sexually assaulted a fellow midshipman while she was incapacitated at a party in Annapolis, the academy said Thursday. Attorneys for Midshipmen Joshua Tate and Eric Graham said the decision by Vice Adm. Michael Miller went beyond the recommendation of a military judge who presided over a preliminary hearing in the case. The attorneys said Cmdr.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
One day after being sentenced to 35 years in prison for espionage in the largest breach of classified documents in the nation's history, U.S. soldier Bradley Manning made a request of all of us: to stop calling him Brad, and start calling her Chelsea. "As I transition into this next phase of my life, I want everyone to know the real me. I am Chelsea Manning. I am a female," Manning said in a public statement Thursday. "Given the way that I feel, and have felt since childhood, I want to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
In the world of the ninja, the Elrod family is an impressive force. Julie and Ron Elrod are black belts who travel to Japan annually to study their craft with Soke Hatsumi, the 34th-generation ninjutsu grandmaster. Their children, 21-year-old Kami and 24-year-old Wyatt, have followed in their footsteps, training with their parents. Experts in the art of self-defense, the Elrods are physically alert and sharp. They are not a family muggers would want to meet in a dark alley. Despite their physical prowess and skill with weapons, the Elrods are more welcoming than intimidating.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Army Pfc. Bradley E. Manning, speaking for the first time since he was charged with espionage for leaking thousands of military and diplomatic documents, apologized that his actions hurt the United States and told a judge Wednesday that he was "dealing with a lot of issues" at the time. Facing Army Col. Denise Lind — who is hearing the case without a jury — and reading from a statement he held in his hands, Manning spoke for three minutes. He said he understood what he was doing at the time but did not fully appreciate the consequences.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | July 5, 1992
While many senior citizens are relaxing in retirement, 80-year-old Bingham Ford is flipping men half his age over his back.Nearly two weeks ago, Mr. Ford became the oldest person in the world to earn a black belt in ninjutso, a Japanese martial art that combines several styles. Last year, Mr. Ford received a black belt in taijutso, an unarmed version of ninjutso."Age is relative," said Mr. Ford, who is a month shy of his 81st birthday. "If you think you're old, you're old."It has taken the agile octogenarian only three years to earn the belt at Will Maier's United Martial Arts studio in Columbia, where Mr. Ford is an assistant teacher and advisory consultant.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1996
Every week, 17-year-old Aaron Seligson and his martial arts teammates at Kick Connection on Ritchie Highway in Pasadena spend at least seven hours jogging and hitting a punching bag as they prepare to defend the world title they won in 1994.The group will travel to Los Angeles in June for the Third World Arnis Tournament, held every two years."We're going to try to win and keep the title," said Aaron, a senior at Broadneck High School. "We'll do our best to hold the title as long as possible."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
The general who led the Pentagon's review of the largest leak of classified documents in U.S. history told a military judge Wednesday that their publication revealed tactics, strained relations with some allies and caused some Afghans to stop cooperating with Americans. But so far as he knows, retired Brig. Gen. Robert Carr said, no one who was named in the reports was killed as a result of the leak. Carr, the former director of the Defense Counterintelligence and Human Intelligence Center at the Defense Intelligence Agency, was the first witness called by prosecutors in the sentencing phase of the court-martial of Army Pfc. Bradley E. Manning.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
A young man comes to Maryland, takes some community college classes, uses his computer skills to get a job in which he gains a security clearance. Still in his 20s, he finds information about government activity that troubles him. He decides to share it with the world. In its broad outlines, the case of Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old intelligence contractor who last week revealed the existence of two top secret National Security Agency eavesdropping programs, hews closely to the contours set by Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, the 25-year-old soldier now being court-martialed at Fort Meade for releasing hundreds of thousands of classified documents.
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