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By CHASE SQUIRES and CHASE SQUIRES,ST. PETERSBURG TIMES | December 20, 2005
Dawna Stone had one mission: Get the job. Though The Apprentice: Martha Stewart - NBC's festival of product placement - never exploded in the ratings, Stone has been burning up the screen from the start. Others played games, built alliances, schemed, cut up, got into shouting matches, got into unsavory predicaments and got drunk. Stone was a rock. After treating every day of her two months on the Mark Burnett reality show like the job interview of her life, the St. Petersburg magazine publisher finds out tomorrow if her strategy worked.
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BUSINESS
By GREG BURNS and GREG BURNS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 1, 2005
Out of prison and free of her monitoring bracelet, Martha Stewart is setting a new standard for post-conviction corporate comebacks. Shares of her Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia have soared in recent months as the jailbird-cum-trendsetter has vaulted back into the mainstream entertainment world. With a daytime talk show that debuted in mid-September and a prime-time Apprentice series that launched Sept. 21, Stewart is riding high - and she's not alone. Although criminal convictions typically spell financial ruin for white-collar defendants, the recent government crackdown on corporate crime has yielded some conspicuous exceptions.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Reporter | September 21, 2005
There won't be a gardener in the whole conference room. Her name is mud with that set. Sixteen candidates begin their televised quest to work for Martha Stewart, as her Apprentice reality show debuts tonight at 8 on NBC. Shorn of her electronic monitoring bracelet, the convicted felon springs into primetime with a spin-off of Donald Trump's Apprentice. "Donald loves to fire people," Stewart told Time. "I find it an extremely unpleasant exercise. I have other people do it for me." Well, she'll have to find the words to let people go. The contenders will be sequentially eliminated as they scrape for the $250,000-a-year job. The Sweet Sixteen, according to the show's Web site, includes a natural foods chef, Los Angeles prosecutor, Internet company owner, TV newscaster and, perhaps, an early favorite - an interior designer named Chuck.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Gillin and Beth Gillin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 18, 2005
Who is this warm and funny woman tossing off risque references to lacy lingerie one minute and soliciting prayers for hurricane victims the next? And what has she done with cool-as-a-cucumber control freak Martha Stewart? In case anyone was wondering whether Stewart would refer to her troubles with the law on her new syndicated lifestyle show, Martha, which made its debut last, the star stepped onstage to thunderous applause and announced: "I am unfettered. I am free. No ankle bracelets."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Farber and Jim Farber,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 18, 2005
NEW YORK - When Lil' Kim contemplates the yearlong prison stretch she's staring down - it will commence tomorrow - she doesn't admit to worrying about the danger of other inmates. Or the depression over confinement. Or the revulsion over the prospect of some really bad meals. Instead, she complains, "It's so frustrating that I won't be able to promote my album." She's certainly making up for lost time now. During a 40-minute interview, the rapper mentions the release date of her CD no less than five times (it's Sept.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2005
"You can figure out how to get it off. It's on the Internet. I looked it up." Martha Stewart on her monitoring bracelet, to Vanity Fair Martha, my dear, thank you for not prematurely hacking off the modern offender supervision device also known as an electronic monitor bracelet. We know you wanted to. We know it itched and, in your words, "the rigid rubber and wire band" irritated and generally was a pain in the ankle. But you stuck it out - except for the undisclosed violation that added three weeks to your home confinement - and tonight at midnight, the federal government, which you were convicted of lying to about a relatively measly stock trade, allows you to remove the monitoring bracelet as your five-month house arrest ends.
FEATURES
June 8, 2005
In the News Ronan Tynan to receive medal at Hopkins today Tenor Ronan Tynan, whose ringing voice comforted mourners at Sept. 11 memorials and Ronald Reagan's funeral last year and who has triumphed over physical disabilities, will receive the Johns Hopkins University President's Medal today. Born with a lower limb disability in Ireland's County Kilkenny, Tynan, 44, had his legs amputated after a motorcycle accident at age 20. He went on to excel in the Paralympic Games (18 gold medals, 14 world records)
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 19, 2005
NEW YORK - Martha Stewart, who has been confined to her home since she served a prison term for obstructing justice, must be resentenced, a federal appeals court ruled. U.S. District Judge Miriam Cedarbaum ordered Stewart last year to serve five months in jail and five months of home detention. Stewart, who was released from a West Virginia prison March 4, told the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York that the sentencing guidelines under which she was punished are no longer binding on judges.
NEWS
March 16, 2005
Corporate scandals Martha Stewart: Serving home confinement after release from prison March 4; convicted of conspiracy, obstruction and making false statements. Tyco International Ltd.: Retrial in progress for former executives L. Dennis Kozlowski and Mark H. Swartz; accused of stealing $600 million from the company. Adelphia Communications Corp.: Founder John Rigas and a son were convicted last year of conspiracy, bank fraud and securities fraud. Another son was acquitted of conspiracy; mistrial on other charges.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | March 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - Martha Stewart, Yahoo, Yellow Jackets. Don't laugh. Just buy, which means pencil in Georgia Tech for a few rounds on your NCAA tournament bracket. This is a safe bet, even if it's going to be the latest, greatest fad among March's mad day traders. By the time this newspaper hits your front walk, Georgia Tech's long-festering secret will no longer be a secret. The Yellow Jackets will probably be rated by Morningstar. Not a bad surge for an unranked team that got zero respect most of the season for its NCAA tournament run last year.
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