Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMartha Stewart
IN THE NEWS

Martha Stewart

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
On Monday night, Artifact Coffee in Hampden will host a promotional event for Martha Stewart's "American Made" program. Two editors from "Martha Stewart Living" will be at the event, which is being billed as a "Baltimore Meetup" for artisans who have built businesses around their hand-crafted and homemade goods. The event is open to the public and will include representatives from Baltimore-based businesses including Millstone Cellars, Kinderhook Snacks, Union Mill Brewing and Hex Ferments.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
On Monday night, Artifact Coffee in Hampden will host a promotional event for Martha Stewart's "American Made" program. Two editors from "Martha Stewart Living" will be at the event, which is being billed as a "Baltimore Meetup" for artisans who have built businesses around their hand-crafted and homemade goods. The event is open to the public and will include representatives from Baltimore-based businesses including Millstone Cellars, Kinderhook Snacks, Union Mill Brewing and Hex Ferments.
Advertisement
NEWS
By David Plotz | November 3, 1999
HERE IS a (partial) list of objects that Martha Stewart has gilded on recent TV shows: pomegranates, pumpkins, cookies, chocolate truffles, wrapping paper, oak leaves, acorns, and -- no kidding -- okra. The only thing Ms. Stewart has not gilded is the lily. But wait till it's back in season.She has proved that alchemy is not impossible: Brush enough gold paint on enough flora, and eventually you'll make real gold. Her recent initial public offering for Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia killed on Wall Street, rising from $18 to $52 before settling at $36.She arrived at the stock exchange on the morning of Oct. 19 toting a tray of brioches.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 30, 2013
Paula Deen has just paid the biggest price in the history of the universe for using a bad word. Her network and just about every last business partner have dumped her. The best guess is that her annual income will drop from about $17 million to around $7 million. That's quite a fine. She also has had to grovel to Jesse Jackson for something called "redemption. " Martha Stewart feels sorry for her. And, in a "Today" show appearance that was painful to watch, she had to absorb the too-cool interrogation by Matt Lauer, of all people, while she stuttered and wept and twisted her hanky.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 1, 2002
BOSTON -- And so we find the woman standing at the newsstand. In her right hand there's a copy of Newsweek with a headline: "Martha's Mess." In her left hand, there's a copy of Martha Stewart Living with a labor-intensive red, white and blue berry tart on the cover. Carefully, the woman tucks them into the collection of stories in her briefcase, each one of which bears a similar headline: "Martha in Hell's Kitchen"; "Come Clean"; "Scandal Leaves Untidy Stain"; "Insider Trading Is Not a Good Thing."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1995
Happy 80th birthday, Mr. Sinatra.* "Saved by the Light" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Once a young actor of considerable promise, now known primarily as Julia Roberts' older brother, Eric Roberts stars in this story of a disagreeable sort who changes his ways after being struck by lightning and spending 30 minutes clinically dead. In films from "Star 80" to "Runaway Train" to "The Coca-Cola Kid," Mr. Roberts has almost invariably played two characters, either a dangerous creepazoid only one step above pond scum or a guy who attended one too many acting classes.
FEATURES
By Judith Blake and Judith Blake,Seattle Times | December 5, 1990
Can this woman be for real?Frustrated wannabes need to know.She looks perfect, from her blond hair to her gleaming smile to her lithe, fit figure.Her house is gorgeous. We know this from all those photographs in the glossy coffee-table books she writes.She sets a stunning table, laden with flowers and wonderful foods. She grows those flowers in a garden overflowing with color, and prepares the foods in a kitchen boasting every cooking convenience.She's famous. And rich.Her books and videos on home entertaining country-elegant style collectively sell in the millions.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | December 5, 2006
Just in time for the holidays, there is advice from Martha Stewart -- in the form of a book the size and weight of a concrete block -- on all the pitfalls of decorating and entertaining and how to remedy them. Everything from extension cords for the tree lights to candle wax on good linens. Martha Stewart's Homekeeping Handbook: The Essential Guide to Caring for Everything in Your Home (Clarkson Potter, $45) is perfect for propping the front door open for your guests, but it also contains a lot of good information.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 6, 2003
AM I going to continue to buy Martha Stewart sheets? Will I make Martha's Star-Spangled Banner Fourth of July cake again, using raspberries for the red stripes and blueberries as the field for the little white stars that I will pipe from a pastry bag loaded with Martha's cream-cheese frosting? You can count on it, darling. It's a tradition in our house, and I wouldn't think of giving it up for the world. Not for the world, I tell you! Every Fourth of July, we pull last year's sheets off the beds and turn them into red-white-and-blue bunting for the front windows of our charming Dutch colonial.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 2004
NEW YORK - Martha Stewart lost her last chance to stave off sentencing on criminal charges yesterday when a federal judge rejected her request for a new trial. Judge Miriam Goldman Cedarbaum, of U.S. District Court in Manhattan, declared that the testimony of a government ink expert who is now accused of perjury could not have affected the jury's March 5 verdict in Stewart's trial. "Overwhelming independent evidence supports the verdict," the judge said. Stewart, 62, faces 10 to 16 months in prison after being convicted of lying to investigators looking into her late 2001 sale of nearly 4,000 shares of ImClone Systems Inc., the biotechnology company that was run by her friend Samuel D. Waksal.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | February 22, 2010
An in-depth profile of underpants bomber Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab by National Public Radio suggests that he was a rebellious teenager offended by his parents' bourgeois lifestyle and preoccupied with thoughts of sex. Any of us who grew up in the 1960s can understand where this kid is coming from. We thought of ourselves as free spirits caged by our parents' narrow, middle-class values and, like young Umar Farouk, their excesses truly offended us. Like Umar Farouk, we thought constantly about sex -- although this determinedly chaste young man could not wait to marry, while we happily embraced the sin of love-the-one-you're-with.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Joannah Hill and Kate Shatzkin and Joannah Hill,Sun Reporters | December 5, 2007
READ New titles worth giving THINKING ABOUT GIVING cookbooks this year -- or asking for them? On the bookstore shelves, you'll find a "bible" of Spanish recipes, a glossy volume devoted to bacon, a crop of vegetable books and a double dose of Martha. Here's a glance at some of the noteworthy new titles for the foodies on your list: Martha Stewart has released not one but two collections -- one in a tasteful salmon, the other in baby blue -- with more than 1,000 recipes each from her Martha Stewart Living magazine.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | March 15, 2007
Ollie Richards, who established a catering business after years of cooking in private homes, died of a stroke Monday at Sinai Hospital. The Gwynn Oak resident was 72. Known for her dishes designed to please the Baltimore palate, she once told a reporter, "Martha Stewart doesn't show me too much." Born Ollie Odell Moody in Northampton County, N.C., she made $12 a week there in domestic service. She arrived in Baltimore in 1958 to become a dining room server for a Ruxton family. "I made $30 a week, and I thought I was rich," she told an Evening Sun reporter in 1993, adding that she was soon inspired by Gertrude Jackson, another Carolinian known throughout North Baltimore for her cooking ability.
NEWS
December 9, 2006
Thursday's paper presented an interesting juxtaposition of articles. The Sun's article on the report from the Iraq Study Group delineates the catastrophe created by the Bush administration in its baseless launching and bungled conduct of the Iraq war ("Time running out in Iraq, panel says," Dec. 7). As one who protested in Washington before and after the invasion of Iraq, I am part of a large group of Americans who has wanted to see justice done - which means no less than the impeachment of an executive who ignored the constitutional limits of his power and lied to the American public.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | December 5, 2006
Just in time for the holidays, there is advice from Martha Stewart -- in the form of a book the size and weight of a concrete block -- on all the pitfalls of decorating and entertaining and how to remedy them. Everything from extension cords for the tree lights to candle wax on good linens. Martha Stewart's Homekeeping Handbook: The Essential Guide to Caring for Everything in Your Home (Clarkson Potter, $45) is perfect for propping the front door open for your guests, but it also contains a lot of good information.
FEATURES
By Tran Ha and Tran Ha,Chicago Tribune | November 4, 2006
HIGH POINT, N.C. --The star power may have been lacking at the recent fall High Point Market (formerly the International Home Furnishings Market), with Martha Stewart conspicuously absent for the launch of her new furniture collection with Bernhardt. But there definitely wasn't a shortage of buzz-worthy introductions. Here are a few new furniture lines and pieces that caught our eye for their design, practicality and affordability. In most cases, the pieces featured will be available in retail stores in about six months.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 2004
NEW YORK - A federal judge refused yesterday to grant Martha Stewart a new trial, paving the way for the celebrity homemaker to be sentenced next week for lying about a stock sale. Judge Miriam Goldman Cedarbaum, in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, brushed aside claims by Stewart and her former stockbroker that their convictions are tainted by charges that a Secret Service ink expert lied on the witness stand. "Because there is no reasonable likelihood that this perjury could have affected the jury's verdict, and because overwhelming independent evidence supports the verdict, the motions are denied," Cedarbaum wrote.
FEATURES
By Seattle Post-Intelligencer | December 13, 1994
For those who just love Martha Stewart, and for those who have seen, heard and read more of this domestic queen than they can bear, there's a new publication that both will adore."
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 12, 2006
Normally, in an Olympics year, February is a pretty grim month for TV viewers who are not big fans of winter sports. Ceding audience, networks and cable channels that don't have the international games cut back on their traditional commitment to sweeps programming and try to lie low until the torch is dimmed. But not this year. With the Olympics appearing on a struggling NBC, the competition smells blood and is taking on the games with such hit shows as Survivor (CBS), Dancing with the Stars (ABC)
FEATURES
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | December 29, 2005
Every week of 2005 seemed to bring more turbulence and upheaval in the world of entertainment and in the personal -- but very public -- lives of the people who bring it to us. First, no one was going to the movies. Then everyone was downloading TV shows onto their iPods. We all wondered what was in the hatch on Lost; we were surprised -- but not that surprised -- to see Michael Jackson show up at court in his pajamas; and Brad and Jen broke our hearts. The awful practice of combining names of celebrity couples reached new heights of awfulness: TomKat, Bennifer II and Brangelina, the one that sounds like a cereal no one would want to eat. It was all so much to cram into one year, we'll take it one month at a time.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.