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Martha Lewis

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By Joseph Esposito and Joseph Esposito,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
Taking the children on the skipjack Martha Lewis out of the Havre de Grace City Yacht Basin provides them a hands-on way to learn about marine life on the Chesapeake Bay. The Chesapeake Heritage Conservancy is a nonprofit organization responsible for the "preservation of one vessel, nearly the last of its type, a living relic of a time when the natural balance was sounder than now," according to the conservancy's Web site, skipjackmar thalewis.org. The organization also assists in the preservation of the Chesapeake Bay. The group's one vessel is the Martha Lewis, built in Wingate in 1955 by Bronza Parks.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | September 21, 2008
The Martha Lewis, one of Maryland's few remaining skipjacks, will return to its home port in Havre de Grace today with a cargo of watermelons from the Eastern Shore. The crew promises to give away dozens of hefty melons in exchange for a donation to the Chesapeake Heritage Conservancy, the ship's owner. "Be here about 6 p.m., and the crew will sign the watermelon, too," said Mac Taylor, a volunteer sailor who was making the three-day trip to St. Michaels and back. The ship, flying its Maryland and Havre de Grace flags, sailed from its berth in Tydings Park Thursday, loaded with about 400 pounds of grapes, harvested that same morning at the nearby Mount Felix Vineyard.
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NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2005
"Aye, aye!" exclaimed Nicholas Paone as he swaggered aboard the ship. The 6-year-old swirled his sword in the air and snarled, "Arrrgh! I'll find the treasure, and then I'll be captain of this ship." Nicholas joined a six-person crew and 21 other young pretend marauders for the inaugural voyage of Treasure Hunters aboard the skipjack Martha Lewis in Havre de Grace. Designed as an educational outing for children, the narrated, two-hour trip combines Chesapeake Bay history and landmarks with rudimentary navigation to search for buried treasure.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | September 21, 2007
Peter Ianniello gathered the first harvest of grapes from his Harford County vineyard and trucked them to a dock in Havre de Grace. To get the two-ton load of fruit to a winemaker in St. Michaels, workers spent an hour putting them on a skipjack for the nine-hour trip to the Eastern Shore. "It took a lot more time to pick than it did to load," Ianniello said, as the captain and crew of the Martha Lewis handled more than 130 crates. Though intended as a historic re-creation of sorts, yesterday's operation presented a contrast to the classic imagery of the skipjack as an oyster dredging vessel.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 30, 2003
Tickets are being sold for the Skipjack Martha Lewis' annual bull and oyster roast fund-raiser April 25, sponsored by the Chesapeake Heritage Conservancy, a nonprofit organization that preserves and operates the vessel. The event, to be held from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. in Frank J. Hutchins Memorial Park, at the foot of Congress Avenue in Havre de Grace, includes pit beef, turkey, ham, raw oysters, clams on the half shell, shrimp gumbo, fried oysters and side dishes, dessert and cash bar. Musical entertainment, raffles and a silent auction are planned.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | July 31, 1994
Sharyn Denbow and Jean Kirkwood of C. Milton Wright High School carefully noted the cormorants and egrets flying overhead.Tom Trafton of Havre de Grace High filled a white plastic bucket with bay water and grasses.Several others in the group plotted their location in the Susquehanna Flats on a map.They were part of an educational trip aboard the recently restored Chesapeake Bay skipjack Martha Lewis.They also are Harford teachers."It's like a vacation," Mr. Trafton, an environmental science teacher, said of the overnight voyage Wednesday from Havre de Grace to Worton in Kent County.
NEWS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,Contributing Writer | January 30, 1994
She's never missed an oyster dredging season in almost 40 years, but for this winter her future seemed uncertain.With parasitic diseases wiping out the oyster population in the Chesapeake Bay, it looked as if the skipjack Martha Lewis was doomed to follow the fate of others in her fleet -- lying on the muddy banks of a cove, slowly rotting away.Instead, she's being restored to her original grandeur when she was known as one of the best working boats on the bay.And when she is returned to the water next month, the Martha Lewis will not only work the bay, trying to do her part catching a few bushels of oysters, but she'll also be a goodwill ambassador for the Havre de Grace Maritime Museum.
NEWS
November 16, 2003
Oyster dredging planned on skipjack Martha Lewis Chesapeake Heritage Conservancy Inc. is taking reservations for its annual oyster-dredging excursions on the skipjack Martha Lewis. The skipjack will depart from the Tidewater Yacht Basin Service Center in Baltimore at 9 a.m. and return by 3 p.m. tomorrow, Thursday and Nov. 24. The cost is $125 and includes six hours of sailing, participating in dredging, lunch, two dozen oysters, and use of rain pants and rubber gloves. This program is limited to 10 passengers a day. Reservations are required.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | February 23, 2007
In December, Capt. Greg Shinn piloted the Martha Lewis on a 30-mile cruise from Havre de Grace to a Baltimore marina for routine repairs. The trip on the 52-year-old skipjack, the last on the Chesapeake Bay that dredges for oysters under sail, went well. "Wood boats always leak a little, but there was nothing untoward going on," Shinn said. Volunteer workers planned to paint, plug holes and replace a few boards on the historic boat, which is used for bay education programs. But while removing worn boards from the hull, they found serious structural damage.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | March 18, 2007
Overcoming unexpected repairs that tripled the annual maintenance costs, workers fixing the skipjack Martha Lewis will return the historic boat to its berth in Havre de Grace in time for the start of this year's schedule of programs. The 52-year-old wooden workboat, one of the few surviving skipjacks in the Chesapeake Bay region, is in the final stages of a $60,000 renovation with an assist from volunteers and financing from donations. Owned by the nonprofit Chesapeake Heritage Conservancy, the boat is a working museum that offers educational programs and social outings.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | March 18, 2007
Overcoming unexpected repairs that tripled the annual maintenance costs, workers fixing the skipjack Martha Lewis will return the historic boat to its berth in Havre de Grace in time for the start of this year's schedule of programs. The 52-year-old wooden workboat, one of the few surviving skipjacks in the Chesapeake Bay region, is in the final stages of a $60,000 renovation with an assist from volunteers and financing from donations. Owned by the nonprofit Chesapeake Heritage Conservancy, the boat is a working museum that offers educational programs and social outings.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | February 23, 2007
In December, Capt. Greg Shinn piloted the Martha Lewis on a 30-mile cruise from Havre de Grace to a Baltimore marina for routine repairs. The trip on the 52-year-old skipjack, the last on the Chesapeake Bay that dredges for oysters under sail, went well. "Wood boats always leak a little, but there was nothing untoward going on," Shinn said. Volunteer workers planned to paint, plug holes and replace a few boards on the historic boat, which is used for bay education programs. But while removing worn boards from the hull, they found serious structural damage.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2005
"Aye, aye!" exclaimed Nicholas Paone as he swaggered aboard the ship. The 6-year-old swirled his sword in the air and snarled, "Arrrgh! I'll find the treasure, and then I'll be captain of this ship." Nicholas joined a six-person crew and 21 other young pretend marauders for the inaugural voyage of Treasure Hunters aboard the skipjack Martha Lewis in Havre de Grace. Designed as an educational outing for children, the narrated, two-hour trip combines Chesapeake Bay history and landmarks with rudimentary navigation to search for buried treasure.
NEWS
November 16, 2003
Oyster dredging planned on skipjack Martha Lewis Chesapeake Heritage Conservancy Inc. is taking reservations for its annual oyster-dredging excursions on the skipjack Martha Lewis. The skipjack will depart from the Tidewater Yacht Basin Service Center in Baltimore at 9 a.m. and return by 3 p.m. tomorrow, Thursday and Nov. 24. The cost is $125 and includes six hours of sailing, participating in dredging, lunch, two dozen oysters, and use of rain pants and rubber gloves. This program is limited to 10 passengers a day. Reservations are required.
NEWS
September 7, 2003
Martha Biggers Lewis, a former Social Security Administration secretary, died Monday at Union Memorial Hospital of complications from Alzheimer's disease. The Catonsville resident was 81. Born Martha Elizabeth Biggers and raised in Northwest Baltimore, she was a graduate of Carver High School. After high school she completed several business training courses at Cortez Peters Business School and went to work as a secretary for the Office of Price Administration, which controlled prices and rationing during World War II. She then worked as a secretary for a real estate agent and later for the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Co. In the mid-1960s, she went to work as a secretary for the Social Security Administration, from which she retired in 1982.
NEWS
By Joseph Esposito and Joseph Esposito,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
Taking the children on the skipjack Martha Lewis out of the Havre de Grace City Yacht Basin provides them a hands-on way to learn about marine life on the Chesapeake Bay. The Chesapeake Heritage Conservancy is a nonprofit organization responsible for the "preservation of one vessel, nearly the last of its type, a living relic of a time when the natural balance was sounder than now," according to the conservancy's Web site, skipjackmar thalewis.org. The organization also assists in the preservation of the Chesapeake Bay. The group's one vessel is the Martha Lewis, built in Wingate in 1955 by Bronza Parks.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | September 21, 2007
Peter Ianniello gathered the first harvest of grapes from his Harford County vineyard and trucked them to a dock in Havre de Grace. To get the two-ton load of fruit to a winemaker in St. Michaels, workers spent an hour putting them on a skipjack for the nine-hour trip to the Eastern Shore. "It took a lot more time to pick than it did to load," Ianniello said, as the captain and crew of the Martha Lewis handled more than 130 crates. Though intended as a historic re-creation of sorts, yesterday's operation presented a contrast to the classic imagery of the skipjack as an oyster dredging vessel.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | April 28, 1996
HAVRE de GRACE -- Sailboats are common enough off Havre de Grace, even in mid-spring with the water temperature still a chilly 50 degrees. But a passing skipjack usually draws a second look, and five skipjacks together is cause to stop and gawk.And so there were gawkers aplenty on the banks of the Susquehanna last weekend as five of the big wooden Chesapeake sloops raced two three-mile laps around a triangular course where the river widens out between Concord and Perry Points and becomes the bay.It's hard to say exactly what drew the specators.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 30, 2003
Tickets are being sold for the Skipjack Martha Lewis' annual bull and oyster roast fund-raiser April 25, sponsored by the Chesapeake Heritage Conservancy, a nonprofit organization that preserves and operates the vessel. The event, to be held from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. in Frank J. Hutchins Memorial Park, at the foot of Congress Avenue in Havre de Grace, includes pit beef, turkey, ham, raw oysters, clams on the half shell, shrimp gumbo, fried oysters and side dishes, dessert and cash bar. Musical entertainment, raffles and a silent auction are planned.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | April 28, 1996
HAVRE de GRACE -- Sailboats are common enough off Havre de Grace, even in mid-spring with the water temperature still a chilly 50 degrees. But a passing skipjack usually draws a second look, and five skipjacks together is cause to stop and gawk.And so there were gawkers aplenty on the banks of the Susquehanna last weekend as five of the big wooden Chesapeake sloops raced two three-mile laps around a triangular course where the river widens out between Concord and Perry Points and becomes the bay.It's hard to say exactly what drew the specators.
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