Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMartha Grimes
IN THE NEWS

Martha Grimes

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
For acclaimed mystery novelist Martha Grimes, the witches' caldron that nearly proved her undoing didn't contain the usual eye of newt and toe of frog. Instead, it held 10 parts gin or sometimes vodka, a splash of vermouth, lemon peel, olive and onion. Grimes was an alcoholic so high-functioning that the people who knew her best never suspected that dry martinis were her intoxicant of choice. Since 1981, the writer, now 82, has published at least one book each year, including 22 of the best-selling Richard Jury mysteries.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
For acclaimed mystery novelist Martha Grimes, the witches' caldron that nearly proved her undoing didn't contain the usual eye of newt and toe of frog. Instead, it held 10 parts gin or sometimes vodka, a splash of vermouth, lemon peel, olive and onion. Grimes was an alcoholic so high-functioning that the people who knew her best never suspected that dry martinis were her intoxicant of choice. Since 1981, the writer, now 82, has published at least one book each year, including 22 of the best-selling Richard Jury mysteries.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2003
Almost 10 years ago, the Alfred A. Knopf company dropped Martha Grimes from its stable of authors. The decision was made by Sonny Mehta, editor in chief since 1987, that successful mystery stories were excessive. Now comes Grimes' Foul Matter (Viking, 372 pages, $25.95), which the chattering masses of New York publishing take as an act of vengeance. In a manner that is more playful than spiteful, it is just that. But Grimes reaches far beyond personalities, delving deep inside the literary business in the United States and finding it intellectually and ethically rancid - drawn at frantic pace by a matched team of cupidity and stupidity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2003
Almost 10 years ago, the Alfred A. Knopf company dropped Martha Grimes from its stable of authors. The decision was made by Sonny Mehta, editor in chief since 1987, that successful mystery stories were excessive. Now comes Grimes' Foul Matter (Viking, 372 pages, $25.95), which the chattering masses of New York publishing take as an act of vengeance. In a manner that is more playful than spiteful, it is just that. But Grimes reaches far beyond personalities, delving deep inside the literary business in the United States and finding it intellectually and ethically rancid - drawn at frantic pace by a matched team of cupidity and stupidity.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | August 1, 1993
On an unmercifully hot day in Baltimore, with the temperature well into the 90s, the air conditioner was going full blast in the Horse You Came In On. There were a few customers in this funky Fells Point pub, chatting with one another or drawing on a beer in an attempt to beat the heat. And then Martha Grimes, the woman who soon will put Baltimore on the best-seller list, poked her head inside.She closed the door and, after absorbing the marked difference in temperature, looked around. Her eyes searched the walls and then the back of the bar, and she wore a quizzical expression.
NEWS
By Lynn Williams | March 10, 1991
THE OLD CONTEMPTIBLES.Martha Grimes.Little, Brown.333 pages. $19.95.Perhaps it's time to retire "whodunit." In many of the bescontemporary examples of the "cozy" mystery genre grandmothered by Agatha Christie, who did the deed is almost incidental to the unpleasant (if thoroughly delightful) unraveling of the characters' destinies. For much of "The Old Contemptibles," there is some question as to whether anything was, in fact, "dun."In Martha Grimes' newest -- named, like her 10 previous novels, for an inn that features in the plot -- her police superintendent hero Richard Jury becomes involved with an enigmatic, troubled woman whose family suffers a series of ambiguous tragedies, including two suicides and two fatal accidents.
NEWS
By Lynn Williams | July 25, 1993
THE HORSE YOU CAME IN ONMartha GrimesKnopf317 pages, $21Could Baltimore, home of "The Star-Spangled Banner" and the Great American Pastime's most avid fans, actually be an English city?Think about it. Baltimore -- at least the pop-literary Baltimore the world knows from Anne Tyler, Barry Levinson and "Sleepless in Seattle" -- is home to characters rich in Brit archetype, including daffy WASP clans and colorful proles with speech patterns even Henry Higgins couldn't untangle. Like the English, we cherish the eccentrics in our midst, and nurture a romantic sense of regret and longing under our humor and crab-thwacking bonhomie.
NEWS
By MARILYN MCCRAVEN CONTENTS UNDER PRESSURE. Edna Buchanan. Hyperion. 277 pages. $21.95. ZTC | September 20, 1992
ELEPHANT HAVE RIGHT OF WAY.Betty Leslie-Melville.Delacorte.48 pages. $15.Elephants constantly talk to each other, but the sound is too low for humans to hear. A mother elephant sprays an oily substance from her trunk onto her babies to prevent sunburn. These facts -- along with dozens of others about wild African animals -- will keep adults and children turning the pages of this work by Betty Leslie-Melville, the Baltimore native who has written 11 children's books.Ms. Leslie-Melville, with her late husband, Jock, started the African Fund for Endangered Wildlife to save animals from poachers.
FEATURES
By TIM WARREN | August 1, 1993
* The Man With a Load of Mischief (1981): This book introduced mystery lovers to Richard Jury, the urbane Scotland Yard detective, and his friend Melrose Plant. Jury investigates a murder outside a pub named the Man With a Load of Mischief.* The Old Fox Deceiv'd (1982): In Yorkshire, Jury attempts to solve the murder of a woman in a mummer's costume.* The Anodyne Necklace (1983): This time Jury is in the small village of Littlebourne to solve a grisly murder.* The Dirty Duck (1984): Shakespeare provides the background for Jury's investigation of a murder in the town of Stratford.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2004
The most appealing thing about mysteries is how transporting they can be. The clues are intriguing to discern and the ending is fun to guess. But what I love best about mysteries is their sense of place. In author Tony Hillerman's Navajo mysteries, it is the arid desert of Arizona and New Mexico, the color of the mountains and the power of the changing weather. In the English mysteries of Martha Grimes, it is the bleak weather of England as seen through the leaded-glass windows of the cozy neighborhood pub. And in the gruesome murder mysteries of Patricia Cornwell, it is the aromatic Italian kitchen of coroner Kay Scarpetta.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | August 1, 1993
On an unmercifully hot day in Baltimore, with the temperature well into the 90s, the air conditioner was going full blast in the Horse You Came In On. There were a few customers in this funky Fells Point pub, chatting with one another or drawing on a beer in an attempt to beat the heat. And then Martha Grimes, the woman who soon will put Baltimore on the best-seller list, poked her head inside.She closed the door and, after absorbing the marked difference in temperature, looked around. Her eyes searched the walls and then the back of the bar, and she wore a quizzical expression.
FEATURES
By TIM WARREN | August 1, 1993
* The Man With a Load of Mischief (1981): This book introduced mystery lovers to Richard Jury, the urbane Scotland Yard detective, and his friend Melrose Plant. Jury investigates a murder outside a pub named the Man With a Load of Mischief.* The Old Fox Deceiv'd (1982): In Yorkshire, Jury attempts to solve the murder of a woman in a mummer's costume.* The Anodyne Necklace (1983): This time Jury is in the small village of Littlebourne to solve a grisly murder.* The Dirty Duck (1984): Shakespeare provides the background for Jury's investigation of a murder in the town of Stratford.
NEWS
By Lynn Williams | July 25, 1993
THE HORSE YOU CAME IN ONMartha GrimesKnopf317 pages, $21Could Baltimore, home of "The Star-Spangled Banner" and the Great American Pastime's most avid fans, actually be an English city?Think about it. Baltimore -- at least the pop-literary Baltimore the world knows from Anne Tyler, Barry Levinson and "Sleepless in Seattle" -- is home to characters rich in Brit archetype, including daffy WASP clans and colorful proles with speech patterns even Henry Higgins couldn't untangle. Like the English, we cherish the eccentrics in our midst, and nurture a romantic sense of regret and longing under our humor and crab-thwacking bonhomie.
NEWS
By MARILYN MCCRAVEN CONTENTS UNDER PRESSURE. Edna Buchanan. Hyperion. 277 pages. $21.95. ZTC | September 20, 1992
ELEPHANT HAVE RIGHT OF WAY.Betty Leslie-Melville.Delacorte.48 pages. $15.Elephants constantly talk to each other, but the sound is too low for humans to hear. A mother elephant sprays an oily substance from her trunk onto her babies to prevent sunburn. These facts -- along with dozens of others about wild African animals -- will keep adults and children turning the pages of this work by Betty Leslie-Melville, the Baltimore native who has written 11 children's books.Ms. Leslie-Melville, with her late husband, Jock, started the African Fund for Endangered Wildlife to save animals from poachers.
NEWS
By Lynn Williams | March 10, 1991
THE OLD CONTEMPTIBLES.Martha Grimes.Little, Brown.333 pages. $19.95.Perhaps it's time to retire "whodunit." In many of the bescontemporary examples of the "cozy" mystery genre grandmothered by Agatha Christie, who did the deed is almost incidental to the unpleasant (if thoroughly delightful) unraveling of the characters' destinies. For much of "The Old Contemptibles," there is some question as to whether anything was, in fact, "dun."In Martha Grimes' newest -- named, like her 10 previous novels, for an inn that features in the plot -- her police superintendent hero Richard Jury becomes involved with an enigmatic, troubled woman whose family suffers a series of ambiguous tragedies, including two suicides and two fatal accidents.
NEWS
By LYNN WILLIAMS THE DEATH OF AN AMERICAN JEWISH COMMUNITY. Hillel Levine and Lawrence Harmon. The Free Press. 400 pages. $24.95. and LYNN WILLIAMS THE DEATH OF AN AMERICAN JEWISH COMMUNITY. Hillel Levine and Lawrence Harmon. The Free Press. 400 pages. $24.95.,LOS ANGELES TIMES THE VESPERS TAPES. Albert DiBartolomeo. Walker and Co. 241 pages. $22.95 | February 16, 1992
DEATH OF A WARRIOR QUEEN. S. T. Haymon.St. Martin's.224 pages. $17.95.In a field near the Norfolk coast of England, where the semi-legendary Queen Boadicea made her final stand against Roman might, a team of archaeologists is piecing together the history of her last days. Dreaming of golden hoards, they turn up little but potsherds and other ancient flotsam.On a nearby beach, though, Inspector Benjamin Jurnet unearths something considerably more interesting. Annie Chance, whose mummified arm beckons him from a crumbled dune, is no warrior queen along Boadicean lines -- and she has not been dead nearly as long.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE MAYFIELD CROSSING. VAUNDA MICHEAUX NELSON. Putnam. ` 88 pages. $14.95 | March 14, 1993
A SHARE IN DEATH.Deborah Crombie.Scribner's.243 pages. $20. Two American authors, Martha Grimes and Elizabeth George, have enjoyed great success with their novels about detectives at England's Scotland Yard. Fans of their work are likely to relish "A Share in Death," the exciting debut of Texas writer Deborah Crombie, which introduces the detecting team of Superintendent Duncan Kincaid, an amiable Scot, and his partner Gemma James, a single mom.After cracking a gruesome serial murder case, Kincaid heads to the bucolic moors of Yorkshire for a well-deserved vacation.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.