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By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | January 22, 2010
Martek Biosciences Corp., a Columbia-based maker of infant formula nutritional supplements, said Thursday it will pay $200 million for a consumer health and wellness product company that will for the first time give its products a direct pipeline to store shelves. Martek is buying Amerifit Brands Inc. from Charterhouse Group Inc., a New York-based private equity investment firm, in a deal that is being funded with $120 million in cash reserves and the rest through loans, the companies said.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2011
Wearing a purple-and-white tie and a gray suit, Feike Sijbesma, head of Dutch multinational conglomerate Royal DSM, was whisked from meeting to meeting at the Columbia headquarters of Martek Biosciences Corp. on a recent weekday. He had spoken to the entire company, a couple of hundred Martek employees. He had met with top executives. Somewhere in between, he squeezed in lunch. Several times before, Sijbesma had visited Martek during the 15 or so years the two companies had done business together.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
Martek Biosciences Corp., a Columbia-based maker of infant formula nutritional supplements, said Thursday it will pay $200 million for a consumer health and wellness product company that will for the first time help give their products a direct pipeline to store shelves. Martek is buying Amerifit Brands Inc. from Charterhouse Group Inc., a New York-based private equity investment firm, in a deal that is being funded with $120 million in cash reserves and the rest through loans, the companies said.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | January 9, 2011
It's nice — but rare — when shares of both companies rise on the announcement of a corporate takeover. Last month, DSM NV said it would buy Columbia-based Martek Biosciences for $1.1 billion in cash. Not only did Martek stock pop by more than 30 percent, reflecting the premium that Netherlands-based DSM agreed to pay over the shares' pre-announcement price; DSM rose by 4 percent, suggesting that its shareholders see the deal as sensible business and not a quixotic power grab by DSM boss Feike Sijbesma.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | January 24, 1995
Gearing up for a possible surge in demand for its infant formula additive, Martek Biosciences Corp. of Columbia yesterday announced that it has signed a letter of intent to buy a Kentucky fermentation plant for $10 million.The Winchester, Ky., plant, which has two 40,000-gallon fermentation tanks, will be used to make a product derived from algae and fungi, called Formulaid, which some studies show improves mental and visual development in infants."With this facility, Martek now possesses the capacity to meet the potential early market demand for Martek's oils for use in infant formula and other nutritional products," said Henry Linsert Jr., the company's chairman and chief executive officer, in a prepared statement.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2010
Martek Biosciences Corp. was started in the mid-1980s by a group of defense and aerospace scientists who wanted to study the effects of algae on humans in long-term spaceflight. The Columbia-based company's improbable history has taken several turns since then, as the scientists eventually found market success with an algae-derived nutritional supplement for infant formulas. And on Tuesday, Martek was acquired for $1.1 billion by Dutch company Royal DSM, the world's largest producer of vitamins.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | December 14, 1994
Martek Biosciences Corp. said yesterday that it has placed its first consumer product on the market, as one of Maryland's brightest biotechnology hopes announced that a Dutch baby formula company has begun using a Martek-invented nutritional supplement.The product, a combination of two fatty acids that Columbia-based Martek derived from algae and fungi, is called Formulaid. A number of studies, including one last month in the prestigious British medical journal the Lancet, have said the two acids promote faster visual and mental development in infants, especially those born prematurely.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | September 2, 1995
Martek Biosciences Corp. of Columbia plans to offer 2 million shares of new stock to the public, the company said yesterday, announcing it has registered the proposed offering with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.Based on yesterday's closing price of $14.50 a share, the offering would raise $29 million before investment banking commissions and other expenses. Martek went public in 1993 at $7 a share.Martek intends to use the proceeds from the offering to market and develop its consumer nutritional products, to pay for capital expenditures including potential expansion of the company's baby formula supplement factory, to fund clinical studies and trials of drugs and for general corporate purposes.
BUSINESS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2006
Shares of Martek Biosciences Corp. jumped as much as 14 percent yesterday after the Columbia biotech company said it landed a deal for its nutritional supplements to be used by General Mills. The cereal giant is expected to launch a food item using Martek's product next year, Martek said in a news release. Martek manufactures DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish and some plants. Its product, which is derived from algae, is in more than two-thirds of the world's baby formula. Martek announced a similar deal last year with Kellogg Co., the country's No. 1 cereal maker.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | September 13, 1994
Martek Biosciences Corp. of Columbia said yesterday that it signed an agreement with drug giant Merck & Co. Inc. to allow Merck to use Martek's "library" of microalgae in a one-year search for organisms that can be made into new drugs.The deal has an initial value "in the low six figures," Martek spokeswoman Mona Hoff said.Its long-term value will depend on payments that Merck would make at later stages of research on specific drugs, and in royalties on those drugs that reach the market."It could be tons of money, but it's so far down the road it doesn't mean much now," Ms. Hoff said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2010
The Securities and Exchange Commission has accused unknown investors in Martek Biosciences Corp. of engaging in illegal insider trading days before last week's announcement of the Columbia company's $1.1 billion acquisition by Dutch company Royal DSM. The SEC filed a lawsuit in federal court in Manhattan one day after Martek, which makes algae-derived nutritional supplements for infant formulas, announced the deal with DSM, the world's largest producer...
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | December 21, 2010
From the BaltTech blog: Royal DSM N.V., a Dutch life and materials sciences company, today made a $1.1 billion cash offer for Martek Biosciences Corp. of Columbia in a deal that represents a 35 percent premium over its stock. Board members from both companies have approved the acquisition of Martek, a company that was founded in Maryland 25 years ago by a group of scientists who spun off from the Martin Marietta Corp. The purchase is based on a 35 percent premium of Martek's closing price of $23.36 on Monday.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2010
Martek Biosciences Corp. was started in the mid-1980s by a group of defense and aerospace scientists who wanted to study the effects of algae on humans in long-term spaceflight. The Columbia-based company's improbable history has taken several turns since then, as the scientists eventually found market success with an algae-derived nutritional supplement for infant formulas. And on Tuesday, Martek was acquired for $1.1 billion by Dutch company Royal DSM, the world's largest producer of vitamins.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
Columbia-based Martek Biosciences Corp. Thursday said it agreed to the $14 million sale of a "significant portion" of a Kentucky plant used to make a health supplement for infant formula. The sale is part of a restructuring effort to lower Martek's production costs as prices for its infant formula additive, which benefits brain development, have dropped. The deal includes a majority of the land and buildings at the site in Winchester, Ky., but does not include the sale or rights to any of Martek's patents or other technologies.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2010
Martek Biosciences Corp., a Columbia-based maker of infant nutritional formula supplements, said Friday it completed the acquisition of Amerifit Brands Inc., which sells consumer health and wellness products. Martek, which announced the deal Jan. 21, bought Amerifit from Charterhouse Group Inc., a New York-based private equity investment firm, for $200 million in cash. The deal was significant for Martek because it intends to develop its own line of consumer products as a way to reinvent its revenue base.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | January 22, 2010
Martek Biosciences Corp., a Columbia-based maker of infant formula nutritional supplements, said Thursday it will pay $200 million for a consumer health and wellness product company that will for the first time give its products a direct pipeline to store shelves. Martek is buying Amerifit Brands Inc. from Charterhouse Group Inc., a New York-based private equity investment firm, in a deal that is being funded with $120 million in cash reserves and the rest through loans, the companies said.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1995
Scientists at Columbia's Martek Biosciences Corp. have been researching microalgae for 10 years with no profits to show for it. But some Wall Street analysts now believe that's about to change.Led by demand for an infant formula additive that the company has developed, Martek's balance sheet should shift from a $10 million loss in 1996 to a $25 million profit in 1998, according to analysts with the Wall Street companies Salomon Bros. and Hambrecht & Quist who follow Martek.That would be no small accomplishment.
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