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By Bailey O'Malia | September 30, 2012
It's all drama at the club on this episode. After living in America for years, Joanna's boyfriend Roman finally becomes a U.S. citizen. “I owe everything to this country,” said Roman, who came to America from France with just $1,000 in his pocket. He worked his way up from restaurant host to successful club owner and Joanna invites all the housewives to join them to celebrate 10 years of success at Roman's club, Mynt. But it doesn't end up being much a celebration. Before the party the girls meet up for sushi and champagne.
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NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | July 16, 2013
It's not enough to tell a woman who enters a crisis pregnancy clinic in Baltimore City that she will not be able to have an abortion there. A center must post a sign to share the information - or at least that is what City Council members voted for in 2009. The law is on hold pending yet another court decision. The U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals earlier this month rejected for technical reasons a previous decision that overturned the law on freedom of speech grounds, and sent the case back to lower court.
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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1996
The state plans to deny another $108,000 to the company that runs its Vehicle Emissions Inspection Program because of financial discrepancies and long wait times at testing stations, officials said yesterday.Maryland already has slashed the fees it pays the company by $122,000 because of operational problems in May and June.At a briefing in Annapolis yesterday, state transportation and environment officials discussed their struggle to get the company, MARTA Technologies Inc. of Nashville, Tenn.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | June 18, 2013
As it turns out, we are "one" Maryland, as Gov. Martin O'Malley likes to say - one Maryland under surveillance by thousands of people who live and work in this state. The fact that Maryland is the spy capital of the United States is the story within the story about revelations that the Fort Meade-based National Security Agency is blanket-surveilling Americans via metadata of their phone records and back-door monitoring of their email. But it is not one that Mr. O'Malley talks about.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1996
State legislative leaders yesterday called a public hearing on reported problems with Maryland's Vehicle Emissions Inspection Program and on the planned sale of the company that runs the program.Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. and House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. said they are concerned about problems uncovered by state auditors and reported yesterday in The Sun. The audits, released at the newspaper's request and never distributed to legislators, found monetary irregularities, poor recordkeeping, inadequate staffing and malfunctioning inspection equipment.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1997
A new contractor will not be taking over Maryland's troubled emissions testing program, disappointing some state legislators who hoped the transfer would lead to better service for motorists.For months, Envirotest Systems Corp. had been negotiating a plan to take over the inspection program from MARTA Technologies Inc., a smaller firm with a spotty record in Maryland. However, the rival companies could not reach a financial settlement and dropped the idea, the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration announced yesterday.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Marina Sarris and Melody Simmons and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1996
The company hired by the state to administer a five-year $96.9 million contract for high-tech vehicle emissions tests is being sold amid charges of mismanagement and shoddy maintenance at testing centers in Maryland and Ohio.MARTA Technologies Inc., a Nashville, Tenn., subsidiary of The Allen Group, a communications company, agreed this week to sell the company to Envirotest Systems Corp. and transfer contracts in three states.Maryland officials said yesterday they were uncertain how the sale would affect operation of the state's Vehicle Emissions Inspection Program, often characterized by long lines and broken equipment.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2001
A few weeks ago, Marta Bradley came out of the shadows. She opened the horizontal blinds that cover the windows of her North Laurel home. She left her car out in the driveway instead of inside the garage. For four years, Bradley and her husband, Scot, had created a strange world for themselves, one full of coded entrances and shuttered windows and traps designed to evade the man they were certain had been stalking them, Marta's former co-worker, Frederick chemist Alan Bruce Chmurny. Last month Chmurny, 57, committed suicide, swallowing a cyanide pill minutes after a Howard County jury convicted him of assault in an attempt to poison Marta Bradley with mercury.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Marina Sarris and Melody Simmons and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1996
The firm hired by the state to administer a five-year $96.9 million contract for high-tech vehicle emissions tests is being sold amid charges of mismanagement and shoddy maintenance testing centers in Maryland and Ohio.MARTA Technologies Inc., a Nashville, Tenn., subsidiary of the Allen Group, a communications company, agreed this week to sell the company to Envirotest Systems Corp. and transfer contracts in three states.Maryland officials said yesterday they were uncertain how the sale would affect operation of the state's Vehicle Emissions Inspection Program, often characterized by long lines and broken equipment.
NEWS
September 16, 1996
EVER SINCE the state changed to a new auto vehicle emissions inspection program in January 1995, it's been one headache after another. The main problem has been incompetence -- and worse -- by the company hired to run the program. State officials are fed up.After he took over 13 months ago as chief of the Motor Vehicle Administration, a concerned Ronald L. Freeland ordered his internal auditors to examine the books of MARTA Technologies Inc., the Tennessee company that runs the state VEIP program.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | May 21, 2013
Baltimore City Council members confused caring about unemployment with abating it by giving preliminary approval to a local hire law last week. The legislation, which requires a final vote and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's signature to become law, requires businesses that are awarded city contracts over $300,000 or receive $5 million or more in city financing to hire 51 percent of new workers from within Baltimore. In promoting it, City Council members sound like they are competing for the "most compassionate" prize.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | May 7, 2013
To those who support "choice" at all costs: Read the grand jury report on Kermit Gosnell. He is the Philadelphia abortion doctor awaiting a verdict in his trial, where he is accused of murdering four babies allegedly born alive and killing 41-year-old refugee Karnamaya Mongar. The charges represent only a fraction of the horrors that went on at the Women's Medical Society clinic, according to the report, where hundreds of children died by "snipping" - his term for sticking scissors into the back of a baby's neck and cutting its spinal cord - and where women were routinely butchered in late-term abortions by untrained medical staff and doped up according to how much they could pay. Here are some lowlights from the report: •"A nineteen-year-old girl was held for several hours after Gosnell punctured her uterus.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | April 23, 2013
Human nature frequently disproves theories. Conventional wisdom, for example, says that open office space plans with workers grouped like cattle encourage creativity and collaboration. But study after study shows that people are more inventive, productive and healthy with more privacy. Susan Cain writes about this eloquently in "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking. " But examples are legion of experience trumping ideology. Would that legislators, like state Sen. Jamie Raskin, keep this in mind when trying to help people.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | April 9, 2013
People say dogs look like their owners. That may not be true, but they certainly look and act like we want them to, as breeds are a construct of generations of culling for certain aesthetic and other traits, including hunting ability, intelligence and, in some cases, viciousness. Which brings us to pit bulls, considered "inherently dangerous" under Maryland law since a 2012 Court of Appeals ruling. Some of the dogs that fall into that general description are ferocious, because humans designed them to be. But so are a lot of other dogs that, for whatever nature or nurture reason, like to bite people - which is why many urged lawmakers to overturn the decision.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | March 12, 2013
The media cover Ray Lewis' faith and his role as spiritual leader of the Ravens frequently. Ray Lewis makes it so. Anyone who has seen him once knows that he understands how to use pageantry to reveal deeper meaning. From taking off his jersey following the post-season win over the Indianapolis Colts to reveal a shirt with "Psalms 91" emblazoned across it to the inimitable way he enunciates each syllable as if he were beseeching God (even when he is talking about what he ate for breakfast)
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | February 26, 2013
Many Maryland politicians spritz on Eau de Hypocrisy at least occasionally. But Gov. Martin O'Malley and fellow Democrats bathed in it with their support for the inaccurately labeled Referendum Integrity Act, an effort to make it harder for citizens to petition a law to referendum. House Bill 493 (SB 673), sponsored by Del. Eric Luedtke, a Democrat from Montgomery County, should be called the "Voter Suppression Act," as that is its clear intent. Among its highlights: •It requires that each petition page contain language saying that the information is subject to public disclosure and requires each signer to include a birth date.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bailey O'Malia | October 12, 2012
This episode foreshadows the drama to come at Leah's gala next week. As usual, not much happened. Leah is throwing a gala, at the low price of $12,500 a table. Adriana and Joanna join her for a tasting. Joanna calls Adriana out for hitting on Roman, which Adriana blows off. Then-like everything else on the show-the topic turns back to Karent. Joanna tells Adriana that she was too hard on Karent for "beating her to the tweet. " Marta tries to apologize to Roman, but he basically tells Marta she is lazy.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | July 8, 1993
In a move to combat air pollution in Baltimore and 13 counties, the state yesterday awarded a $96.9 million contract to a Nashville, Tenn., company that will bring Maryland motorists a tougher, more time-consuming and expensive tailpipe test.MARTA Technologies Inc. will build and equip 19 emissions inspection stations and turn them over to the state under terms of the contract approved by the state Board of Public Works. The company will operate the stations for three years, with an option for two more.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | February 12, 2013
In 1931, economist John Maynard Keynes lamented, "A sound banker, alas, is not one who foresees danger and avoids it, but one who, when he is ruined, is ruined in a conventional way along with his fellows, so that no one can really blame him. " Substitute "state treasurer" and "pension board member" for "banker" in the quote and it describes someone who oversees a state retirement and pension system whose 350,000 members either rely on it in...
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | January 29, 2013
The O'Malley administration is all for enforcing infractions on state residents - but holds itself to an entirely less stringent moral and legal standard. The push to double E-ZPass fines is a case in point. The Maryland Transportation Authority (MdTA) would like to increase late fees for E-ZPass infractions to $50 and potentially suspend vehicle registrations for nonpayment in legislation yet to be introduced this session. For starters, the proposed punishment far exceeds the crime.
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