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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 3, 1994
Musically speaking, Wynton Marsalis has a great life right now.He couldn't be more creative, or keep any busier, than he is at the moment. "I have 13 records that are recorded," he says. "In the can. I have four notebooks that are full of music that I want to record. I just keep creating, going around the world. I have a good time."As he speaks over the phone, Marsalis is in New Orleans, rehearsing his band for a two-week tour of churches to promote his current recording, "In This House, On This Morning."
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 29, 2008
A few years ago, when the University of Baltimore unveiled its intimate Performing Arts Theater at the Student Center, a handsome new Steinway concert grand, selected by eminent pianist Yefim Bronfman, was part of the package. That piano will soon get a significant workout. A "Great Pianists Series" will be inaugurated during the 2008-2009 season, starting on Oct. 11 with jazz pianist Ellis Marsalis, father of Wynton and Branford, among others. The senior Marsalis is a considerable force in his own right - as a performer, composer and teacher.
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FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 9, 1990
According to the media buzz, Wynton Marsalis is one of jazz's new traditionalists -- you know, those nicely-dressed young men who disdain rock-and-roll and play the sort of jazz college kids in the '60s used to adore. In fact, the 29-year old trumpeter (who performs in Shriver Hall this evening) is widely credited with having singlehandedly sparked the movement.It's not a portrait Marsalis entirely agrees with. Although he doesn't mind the attention -- "Believe me, I'm grateful to get any publicity," he laughs, "even when it's bad" -- he feels this portrait often leads people to the wrong conclusion about the motives behind his work.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | June 13, 2007
In the photographs of Ellis L. Marsalis III, home is a place called tha bloc, a sliver of East Baltimore in the Belair-Edison community, where everything is not always what it seems. When Marsalis moved into the neighborhood a little more than a decade ago, the area was already in transition. The German and Polish steelworkers who'd lived there for decades were moving out, to be replaced by a new generation of African-American homeowners. The community has also seen an influx of less-affluent residents, many of whom were relocated from the city-owned Flag House Courts public-housing complex near Little Italy that was demolished in 2001.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1990
COMPLIMENTS are widely distributed within the tight-knit circles of jazz artists living in New York City.It seems no one of late has come close to the quantity or quality of praise that saxophone player Branford Marsalis has received.Called a "Renaissance man" by several media critics and ''the future of jazz music" by others, Marsalis has virtually left his younger brother Wynton behind with his volume of work that includes writing, composing and acting.Yet despite his immense power, not even Marsalis could save his piano player, Kenny Kirkland -- whom he said was "the most sought after player in New York" -- from being snatched away by a greater force.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | March 15, 2007
On the playlist this week, a jazz luminary ponders the current state of affairs in black America; a pop-folk veteran dives into the blues; and a much-hyped 23-year-old British soul singer unabashedly evokes the '60s. Wynton Marsalis, From the Plantation to the Penitentiary: With each release, Marsalis works to push his approach. "It's important that you can produce something that's honest and full of good information," the New Orleans trumpeter told me in a 2004 interview. With his latest effort, Marsalis proves that he is a man of his word: This provocatively titled album ripples with truth and gives listeners much to think about.
NEWS
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 10, 1990
When Wynton Marsalis first burst on to the scene, his arrival was applauded for a number of reasons. There was his youth, his virtuosity, his belief in tradition and adherence to classic jazz forms. It was obvious even then that he was going to be an influential stylist on trumpet, and an important figure in jazz.But the one thing no one could have guessed was that Marsalis would become a brilliant young bluesman, to boot.It's not hard to understand why. Most listeners think of the blues as being just an adjunct to jazz; a root element, to be sure, but hardly the stuff of great improvisations.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 13, 2003
As you examine the lines and movements of a Romare Bearden work - Drum Chorus (1986), Slapping Seventh Avenue With the Sole of My Shoes (1981) and others - you can hear the music. You can hear the horns ebb, flow and soar, the drums roll, the voices wail and explode. No other visual artist captured with paint and photographs the essence, the funk, the soul of the African-American experience the way Bearden did. Like the jazz that inspired him, the paintings swing - the rhythms aflame in oils, watercolors and collages.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 7, 1995
How did Bruce Hornsby and Branford Marsalis wind up playing the national anthem before Cal Ripken's record-breaking game last night?Simple. They're Angels fans.Hornsby's relationship with the team goes back to a Grateful Dead show in 1991. "You know -- Wally Joyner and Dave Winfield on the stage, stuff like that," he says. So the pianist got into the habit of seeing the team at Camden Yards, the closest major-league stadium to his Williamsburg, Va., home."Every time the Angels come [to Camden Yards]
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 29, 2008
A few years ago, when the University of Baltimore unveiled its intimate Performing Arts Theater at the Student Center, a handsome new Steinway concert grand, selected by eminent pianist Yefim Bronfman, was part of the package. That piano will soon get a significant workout. A "Great Pianists Series" will be inaugurated during the 2008-2009 season, starting on Oct. 11 with jazz pianist Ellis Marsalis, father of Wynton and Branford, among others. The senior Marsalis is a considerable force in his own right - as a performer, composer and teacher.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | March 15, 2007
On the playlist this week, a jazz luminary ponders the current state of affairs in black America; a pop-folk veteran dives into the blues; and a much-hyped 23-year-old British soul singer unabashedly evokes the '60s. Wynton Marsalis, From the Plantation to the Penitentiary: With each release, Marsalis works to push his approach. "It's important that you can produce something that's honest and full of good information," the New Orleans trumpeter told me in a 2004 interview. With his latest effort, Marsalis proves that he is a man of his word: This provocatively titled album ripples with truth and gives listeners much to think about.
NEWS
By THE ST. PETERSBURG (FLA.) TIMES | April 28, 2006
You cannot make something in the arts exciting for somebody who is raised looking at videos of the most well-buffed people in the world with their a-- hanging out."- WYNTON MARSALIS, jazz musician, on young people and the arts
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | December 5, 2004
Ellis Louis Marsalis III cooks bacon and biscuits for his 13-year-old son Django's breakfast in their house on the north end of the Belair-Edison neighborhood. Django's eyes are drooping and his hair is tousled after sleeping late, but he manages a languid handshake for a visitor to his block. Django and his father and sister, Maria, who's 12, are just back from Thanksgiving in New York at Uncle Wynton's. Uncle Wynton, of course, is Wynton Marsalis, the brilliant jazz trumpet player, composer, artistic director of the new performing arts center for jazz at New York's Lincoln Center -- and leader of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 4, 2004
The day has ended; the lights are low. And the house is clean, still and quiet. Tucked in, the kids drift on to Dreamsville as you and your significant other finally get a moment alone. This is the time Wynton Marsalis calls "the magic hour," and it's the title of his debut for the storied Blue Note label. "The feeling is fun," says the classical-jazz trumpeter, phoning from his New York office. "I wanted the record to be relaxed. It's about bringing different generations together. It celebrates everybody being together."
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 13, 2003
As you examine the lines and movements of a Romare Bearden work - Drum Chorus (1986), Slapping Seventh Avenue With the Sole of My Shoes (1981) and others - you can hear the music. You can hear the horns ebb, flow and soar, the drums roll, the voices wail and explode. No other visual artist captured with paint and photographs the essence, the funk, the soul of the African-American experience the way Bearden did. Like the jazz that inspired him, the paintings swing - the rhythms aflame in oils, watercolors and collages.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 1, 2003
The 16th Columbia Festival of the Arts sold 7,100 tickets to 14 performances this year, far surpassing previous years' sales, organizers said yesterday. Last year, the festival reported nearly 4,000 tickets sold. Tickets sold out for two performances by dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov, a concert by Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, and one of two nights with comedy group The Second City, said Stewart Seal, the festival's executive director. Other dance, drama and musical performances drew respectable crowds also.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 4, 2004
The day has ended; the lights are low. And the house is clean, still and quiet. Tucked in, the kids drift on to Dreamsville as you and your significant other finally get a moment alone. This is the time Wynton Marsalis calls "the magic hour," and it's the title of his debut for the storied Blue Note label. "The feeling is fun," says the classical-jazz trumpeter, phoning from his New York office. "I wanted the record to be relaxed. It's about bringing different generations together. It celebrates everybody being together."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | June 13, 2007
In the photographs of Ellis L. Marsalis III, home is a place called tha bloc, a sliver of East Baltimore in the Belair-Edison community, where everything is not always what it seems. When Marsalis moved into the neighborhood a little more than a decade ago, the area was already in transition. The German and Polish steelworkers who'd lived there for decades were moving out, to be replaced by a new generation of African-American homeowners. The community has also seen an influx of less-affluent residents, many of whom were relocated from the city-owned Flag House Courts public-housing complex near Little Italy that was demolished in 2001.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 25, 2003
Like a neighbor's big, playful dog running into your manicured flowerbed, jazz invaded the staid realm of classical music early in the 20th century and stirred things up good. Even some bred-in-the-Brahms composers found it hard to ignore the syncopated rhythms and saucy chords. Music with one foot in classical traditions, one foot in jazz soon materialized; such music is still being written. Examples of this cross-pollination provide the main hook for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's latest Symphony With a Twist program, conducted by Thomas Wilkins and featuring sax virtuoso Branford Marsalis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | February 24, 2002
There's an unmistakable Russian tint to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's 2002-2003 season -- 17 works by 11 Russian composers. But that's only part of the picture. Also providing color is a welcome sampling of pieces by contemporary composers, along with works by rather infrequently encountered masters of the past (more than a dozen pieces will get their first BSO performances). Putting the finishing touches on the season, as usual, will be lots of meat-and-potatoes music. The lineup lacks the extra excitement that, say, a world premiere can provide, but it has distinct strengths.
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