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By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | July 7, 1992
The countdown for the next mission to the red planet begins today for Martin Marietta Corp. as it officially marks the activation of launch complex 40 at Cape Canaveral, Fla., the launch site for the Mars Observer scheduled to blast off in mid-September.Martin won a $335 million Air Force contract in 1989 to refurbish the 27-year-old launch tower and provide the military with another East Coast tower for launching Titan rockets, which carry some of its military satellites into space.But the launch complex's first use is not scheduled to be a military mission.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | July 10, 1994
After planting his boots on the moon, the first thing Neil Armstrong did was scoop up some pebbles and stuff them in a pocket, just in case he had to make a quick getaway. Retrieval of lunar soil was the chief scientific aim of the Apollo program, which mobilized an army of engineers and scientists, enlisted America's industrial might and, at its peak, consumed 1 percent of the nation's gross national product.Today, two scientists are trying to persuade NASA to let them retrieve rocks from another extraterrestrial object.
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NEWS
By Robert Lee Hotz and Robert Lee Hotz,Los Angeles Times | August 25, 1993
PASADENA, Calif. -- The Mars Observer, at the crucial moment in its 480 million-mile journey to Mars, ignored NASA's furious commands yesterday and may have missed its orbit around the planet.National Aeronautics and Space Administration flight controllers had no way of knowing whether the planetary probe had safely reached a planned Martian orbit on its own. They had nothing except a faith in their own skill to sustain the belief that the spacecraft still existed.Engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is running the mission, listened in vain through the antennas of the agency's Deep Space Network for any sign of the lost spaceprobe.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A federal panel investigating the disappearance of NASA's Mars Observer space probe concluded yesterday that the spacecraft probably leaked enough fuel -- barely two tablespoons full -- to cause an explosion, knocking the first U.S. mission to Mars in 17 years out of contact with Earth.But the panel noted that no one will ever know for certain exactly what happened to the Mars Observer. No sign of the probe has been detected since August.Mission controllers plan one last attempt to contact the missing spacecraft next month, but they do not expect the probe to reply.
NEWS
By Christian Science Monitor | August 30, 1993
BOSTON -- Mars Observer team members have not yet given up on their silent spacecraft. But space exploration planners are starting to assess the ramifications of its probable loss.Without the data that was to have made Mars the best-mapped planet in the solar system, future missions that depended on that information now must be re-examined.That loss, however, aids the cause of administrator Daniel Goldin as he reshapes the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He is trying to, among other things, wean NASA from its appetite for massive, costly space-science ventures.
NEWS
By Newsday | September 16, 1992
Nearly two decades after its automated Viking spacecraft made the first dramatic landings on the surface of Mars, the United States is preparing to renew its exploration of the Red Planet.With an eye toward manned landings on Mars in the 21st century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is about to launch a sophisticated orbiter -- called Mars Observer -- that may yield much more about the planet's weather, terrain and geology.Unlike the Viking landers -- which scooped up and analyzed Martian soil in a fruitless search for signs of life -- the Mars Observer will not carry out any biological investigations.
NEWS
August 26, 1993
Hardly anyone in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration would agree, but the apparent failure of its mission to Mars could have beneficial effects for space exploration in the long run.The immediate result of the Mars Observer disaster is a serious setback for an ambitious international space program to explore Mars in the coming decade.This mission was to pave the way for others -- two Russian spacecraft next year and in 1996 and other multinational projects to follow into the early years of the 21st century.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A federal panel investigating the disappearance of NASA's Mars Observer space probe concluded yesterday that the spacecraft probably leaked enough fuel -- barely two tablespoons full -- to cause an explosion, knocking the first U.S. mission to Mars in 17 years out of contact with Earth.But the panel noted that no one will ever know for certain exactly what happened to the Mars Observer. No sign of the probe has been detected since August.Mission controllers plan one last attempt to contact the missing spacecraft next month, but they do not expect the probe to reply.
NEWS
By ROBERT C. COWEN | August 19, 1993
The first human footfall on Mars still lies in the indefinite future. But robotic study of that intriguing planet is entering a phase that could be the next best thing to being there.Encouraged by this prospect, planetary explorers are dreaming ambitious dreams they can reasonably expect to fulfill over the next couple of decades.They hope to gain an intimate on-site knowledge of the Red Planet by studying it from the outside in. That's why they view the arrival next week of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Mars Observer spacecraft as just the beginning of a new saga of planetary exploration.
NEWS
By John Noble Wilford and John Noble Wilford,New York Times News Service | August 24, 1993
After an 11-month, 450-million-mile voyage, the Mars Observer spacecraft should arrive at its destination today, primed to swing into orbit around Mars.But there has been nothing but silence from the craft since Saturday night, and puzzled flight controllers were becoming more fearful yesterday that the $1 billion mission might be doomed.Mission officials said there was one "ray of hope." Engineering studies on the ground suggested that a faulty clock aboard the spacecraft could be responsible for the recent loss of communications.
NEWS
By Christian Science Monitor | August 30, 1993
BOSTON -- Mars Observer team members have not yet given up on their silent spacecraft. But space exploration planners are starting to assess the ramifications of its probable loss.Without the data that was to have made Mars the best-mapped planet in the solar system, future missions that depended on that information now must be re-examined.That loss, however, aids the cause of administrator Daniel Goldin as he reshapes the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He is trying to, among other things, wean NASA from its appetite for massive, costly space-science ventures.
NEWS
By ROBERT L. PARK | August 29, 1993
Washington. -- Somewhere out there, a billion-dollar NASA spacecraft is careening through the solar system, apparently oblivious to the frantic efforts of Earthlings to contact it.In Pasadena, demonstrators outside NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory charged that the silence of the Mars Observer is part of a NASA cover-up of evidence that extraterrestrials have built gigantic icons on Mars.In Washington, the usual assumption is that if it's not a conspiracy it must be incompetence. That's probably wrong too.In recent months, after all, NASA science missions have achieved some stunning successes: COBE's amazing discovery of the microwave remnants of the Big Bang; Magellan's mapping of the entire surface of Venus by radar, revealing a landscape no human eye will ever see; results from the Gamma Ray Observatory that are changing our understanding of the evolution of galaxies.
NEWS
August 26, 1993
Hardly anyone in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration would agree, but the apparent failure of its mission to Mars could have beneficial effects for space exploration in the long run.The immediate result of the Mars Observer disaster is a serious setback for an ambitious international space program to explore Mars in the coming decade.This mission was to pave the way for others -- two Russian spacecraft next year and in 1996 and other multinational projects to follow into the early years of the 21st century.
NEWS
By Robert Lee Hotz and Robert Lee Hotz,Los Angeles Times | August 25, 1993
PASADENA, Calif. -- The Mars Observer, at the crucial moment in its 480 million-mile journey to Mars, ignored NASA's furious commands yesterday and may have missed its orbit around the planet.National Aeronautics and Space Administration flight controllers had no way of knowing whether the planetary probe had safely reached a planned Martian orbit on its own. They had nothing except a faith in their own skill to sustain the belief that the spacecraft still existed.Engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is running the mission, listened in vain through the antennas of the agency's Deep Space Network for any sign of the lost spaceprobe.
NEWS
By John Noble Wilford and John Noble Wilford,New York Times News Service | August 24, 1993
After an 11-month, 450-million-mile voyage, the Mars Observer spacecraft should arrive at its destination today, primed to swing into orbit around Mars.But there has been nothing but silence from the craft since Saturday night, and puzzled flight controllers were becoming more fearful yesterday that the $1 billion mission might be doomed.Mission officials said there was one "ray of hope." Engineering studies on the ground suggested that a faulty clock aboard the spacecraft could be responsible for the recent loss of communications.
NEWS
By ROBERT C. COWEN | August 19, 1993
The first human footfall on Mars still lies in the indefinite future. But robotic study of that intriguing planet is entering a phase that could be the next best thing to being there.Encouraged by this prospect, planetary explorers are dreaming ambitious dreams they can reasonably expect to fulfill over the next couple of decades.They hope to gain an intimate on-site knowledge of the Red Planet by studying it from the outside in. That's why they view the arrival next week of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Mars Observer spacecraft as just the beginning of a new saga of planetary exploration.
NEWS
By ROBERT L. PARK | August 29, 1993
Washington. -- Somewhere out there, a billion-dollar NASA spacecraft is careening through the solar system, apparently oblivious to the frantic efforts of Earthlings to contact it.In Pasadena, demonstrators outside NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory charged that the silence of the Mars Observer is part of a NASA cover-up of evidence that extraterrestrials have built gigantic icons on Mars.In Washington, the usual assumption is that if it's not a conspiracy it must be incompetence. That's probably wrong too.In recent months, after all, NASA science missions have achieved some stunning successes: COBE's amazing discovery of the microwave remnants of the Big Bang; Magellan's mapping of the entire surface of Venus by radar, revealing a landscape no human eye will ever see; results from the Gamma Ray Observatory that are changing our understanding of the evolution of galaxies.
NEWS
By Newsday | September 16, 1992
Nearly two decades after its automated Viking spacecraft made the first dramatic landings on the surface of Mars, the United States is preparing to renew its exploration of the Red Planet.With an eye toward manned landings on Mars in the 21st century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is about to launch a sophisticated orbiter -- called Mars Observer -- that may yield much more about the planet's weather, terrain and geology.Unlike the Viking landers -- which scooped up and analyzed Martian soil in a fruitless search for signs of life -- the Mars Observer will not carry out any biological investigations.
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