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NEWS
May 26, 2003
On May 21, 2003 VERNICE MARROW, devoted mother of Ronnie E. Cheek and beloved sister of Margaret Labroi, Samuel M. Parham and Dr. Prince E. Parham. She is also survived by four grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, two sisters-in-law, one daughter-in-law, two step-children, nieces, nephews and other relatives. Friends may call at the Estep Brothers Funeral Home P.A., 1300 Eutaw Place, Tuesday 10 A.M. to 3 P.M. After 4 P.m. Tuesday Mrs. Marrow will rest at Mt. Hebron Baptist Church, 2651 W. North Avenue.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
When it comes to potential bone marrow donors, midshipmen at the Naval Academy are just the right candidates. They're a young, healthy and ethnically diverse bunch. And more than 2,000 of them have now joined a program, supported by the Pentagon, to enroll members of the military in a bone marrow donor registry. Midshipmen lined up this month to fill out paperwork and have the inside of a cheek swabbed — necessary steps to join the Salute to Life bone marrow registry, based in Rockville.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 1, 1994
A new technique offers a tantalizing hope of greatly increasing the number of leukemia patients who can have potentially lifesaving bone marrow transplants.In a paper published yesterday in the journal Blood, researchers in Israel and Italy report that it might be possible to use bone marrow donors who would ordinarily be considered incompatible with leukemia patients by treating the marrow in a particular way before it is transplanted.At least two groups of researchers in the United States are finding the same thing.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Multiple myeloma is cancer of the bone marrow, an incurable type of the disease that kills about 10,700 people a year. But for the 22,000 diagnosed annually, including recently Tom Brokaw, former NBC news anchor, there are new options for treatment and more kinds of therapies in the works, according to Dr. Gary I. Cohen, medical director of the Sandra & Malcolm Berman Cancer Institute at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He answers questions about the disease. What is multiple myeloma?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
When Debra Granik, the 47-year-old director of the searing drama "Winter's Bone," came of age in Bethesda and Silver Spring, Baltimore represented "this true place that had real neighborhoods and a phenomenal working-class history and port history." She loved to visit relatives here. It made her wonder "what it would have been like to come from Baltimore." For a creative soul with a thirst for unsanitized experience, Baltimore was like a gritty anti-Shangri-la, alluring for its heady dose of risk and reality.
NEWS
By Chris Poore and Chris Poore,Special to The Carroll County Sun | July 21, 1991
LEXINGTON, Ky. -- Bit by bit, doctors gathered more than a quart of liquid with marrow from 12-year-old Lauren Benz's hip bone early Friday morning.Just after nightfall, the red liquid dripped into the veins of her father, the Rev. Bert Benz.If all goes well, it will work its way into the 47-year-old Hampstead pastor's bones to replace diseased marrow that chemotherapy and radiation treatments have destroyed.Benz said Lauren was doing well."She's just really tired," he said six hours after her surgery here.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | October 3, 1993
Now he can say it. Twenty-seven years ago, when Dr. George W. Santos was honing bone marrow transplantation into a lifesaving therapy for victims of blood diseases, the odds were so low, "You'd have to be out of your mind to try it."But yesterday, this man with rumpled gray hair and a kindly grin looked across a room crowded with survivors -- 100 men, women and children who had been rescued from the threshold of death by a procedure that is now conventional."Who has the chance to be at the beginning of something and see all that's happened?"
NEWS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | October 8, 1995
SAN FRANCISCO -- The University of California at San Francisco has given the green light to a controversial experiment in which a man will be injected with bone marrow from a baboon in the hope the animal's immune system will help him fight the AIDS virus.Clearance by medical committees evaluating the safety and ethics of the experiment means that preparations can begin for the procedure on volunteer Jeff Getty, a 38-year-old Oakland AIDS activist who has battled critics and the Food and Drug Administration to win approval for the test.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
Patterson's 5-foot-7, 220-pound Claude Marrow used quickness and balance to outmaneuver Annapolis' 6-4, 277-pound Anne Arundel County champ Nate Brooks (20-4), earning a 9-1 victory to become his school's first Class 3A-4A East region champ at Meade last night.Marrow showed why he was chosen the Outstanding Wrestler at last weekend's Baltimore City tournament, where he won his third straight city title and led the Clippers to their first team title.Wrestling with a chronic knee injury, Marrow scored his 21st and 22nd pins before facing Brooks, who had 17 pins.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad | July 20, 1991
The Rev. Bert Benz, pastor of Faith Baptist Church in Hampstead, is looking death in the eye and laughing at it."You've heard of fried and refried beans?," Mr. Benz asked after a week's worth of radiation and chemotherapy treatments. "Well, I'm fried and refried Benz."The 47-year-old pastor spoke by telephone from his hospital room at the Markey Cancer Center in Lexington, Ky., where he is receiving a bone marrow transplant from his 12-year-old daughter. It is his only chance for surviving leukemia, his doctors say. And it's a risky chance at best because his daughter's marrow is not a perfect match.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 20, 2013
Good Morning America's Robin Roberts returned to the anchor desk this morning, five months after taking temporary leave for a bone marrow transplant. Her welcome back included a video message from President Obama. "I keep pinching myself and I realize this is real," Roberts said about her return. Roberts had to get the transplant after doctors diagnosed her with the rare condition myelodysplastic syndromes, or MDS. MDS is a group of disorders that cause the bone marrow to produce an inadequate number of helathy red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Halloween night, most caldrons will be filled with candy. But the ones on the stove might be filled with bones (cue creepy music). The holiday aside, in this era of nose-to-tail dining, adding "bones" to the shopping list doesn't seem unusual — nor should it. Dogs know what humans should: Bones are nutritious and delicious. Cooking with bones is as old as cooking itself. In the "appetizers and snacks" section of "Le Guide Culinaire," published in 1903, the famed French chef Auguste Escoffier included a simple recipe for grilled sirloin bones: "Sprinkle them with cayenne," he advised.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
"Good Morning America"  co-host George Stephanopoulos used the adjective "staggering" to describe the response to his on-air partner Robin Roberts' announcement this week that she has a blood disease and needs a bone marrow transplant. In the 24 hours since that announcement on GMA, the number of bone marrow donors rose more than 1,000 percent, ABC News reports. This is a story milllions of viewers will follow closely, and one takeaway from the response this week is a reminder of how deeply many of us come to care about the people we see day in and day out on TV. This seems to be especially true in morning television where there is an ongoing conversation between the hosts and their audience with personal aspects of the TV performers' lives shared.
NEWS
June 2, 2011
The best thing in today's world is that our kids no longer wait till they are adults to get involved when they see a need. North Laurel resident Joshua Driesman has lost two members of his extended family to leukemia. He is not 18 yet, so he cannot donate but that is not stopping Joshua. He is holding a bone marrow donor drive Wednesday, June 8 at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab from 4 to 6 p.m. so that he can try and help others fighting this terrible disease. Have you ever thought of signing up to be a donor?
EXPLORE
May 26, 2011
The best thing in today's world is that our kids no longer wait till they are adults to get involved when they see a need. North Laurel resident Joshua Driesman has lost two members of his extended family to leukemia. He is not 18 yet, so he cannot donate, but that is not stopping Joshua. He is holding a bone marrow donor drive Wednesday, June 8 from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab so that he can try and help others fighting this terrible disease.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
The freshman class at Loyola Blakefield is trying to carry out the school motto, "men for others," as students rally around classmate Joe Gorman. The 14-year-old, who has attended the private school since sixth grade, is fighting acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a rare genetic form of the blood disease. He needs a bone marrow transplant, but no family member is a suitable match. Gorman's classmates, who are too young to be marrow donors themselves, are raising money with carwashes, raffles and other events.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | February 6, 1991
When the Rev. Bert Benz counsels dying people, there's one thing they can't say.They can't tell him he doesn't understand. Because the 47-year-old Baptist minister is dying, too.Last August, the pastor of Hampstead's Faith Baptist Church was diagnosed with a rare cancer called chronic myelogenous leukemia.Without a bone marrow transplant, he likely won't live more than threeto five years, Benz says. His chances of finding a public donor are 1 in 20,000. If he finds a donor, there's a 25 percent chance that the operation would be successful.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | December 23, 1990
Jennifer Zile and her younger brother, Ian, won't be able to spend Christmas together this year, but he's already given her the biggest gift of his 5-year-old life.Nine days ago, Ian donated a pint of his bone marrow to Jennifer, 8, who has acute myelogenous leukemia. Her family and doctors hope the donated marrow will make new blood cells the way her own marrow would and cure the leukemia.The transplant was done Dec. 14 at Children's Hospital in Washington, with the marrow administered to Jennifer through an intravenous tube while she and her mother, Linda, watched.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
When Debra Granik, the 47-year-old director of the searing drama "Winter's Bone," came of age in Bethesda and Silver Spring, Baltimore represented "this true place that had real neighborhoods and a phenomenal working-class history and port history." She loved to visit relatives here. It made her wonder "what it would have been like to come from Baltimore." For a creative soul with a thirst for unsanitized experience, Baltimore was like a gritty anti-Shangri-la, alluring for its heady dose of risk and reality.
NEWS
By Tahira Lindsay and Capital News Service | December 22, 2009
Cathy Miles is talking about "the children," and seven mothers sitting in the lunchroom of the East Baltimore Community School are gazing at her intently and nodding in agreement. "Every child deserves the opportunity to succeed," Miles says on this autumn evening. "That's our commitment to our students." And the women nod again. It's community engagement night at the school, and although only seven mothers have come - down from 50 parents last month - Miles, the principal of this new school set in a redevelopment project, stands in the center of the room talking about achievement and discipline.
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