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NEWS
April 26, 2005
Luril D. Greene-Curtis, a hotel worker, died of a heart attack Thursday at Maryland General Hospital. The East Baltimore resident was 38. Born Luril D. Greene in Baltimore, she was raised on East Preston Street. After graduating in 1984 from the Institute of Notre Dame, she took at job with the FBI in Washington. In 1993, she became a hotel concierge at the Radisson Plaza Lord Baltimore. She later held a job in human resources at the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel and since last year had been working the front desk at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn. Mrs. Greene-Curtis enjoyed dancing, cooking and entertaining.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
A Hungarian man who blackmailed a U.S. hotel chain into giving him a job was sentenced to 2.5 years in prison, federal prosecutors said Wednesday. Attila Nemeth, 26, was also sentenced to serve three years of supervised release following his time in prison, according to a statement by Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Nemeth pleaded guilty in November to hacking the computer system of Marriott International Corp. and threatening to release the company's proprietary information unless the chain gave him a job maintaining the company's computer system.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2003
NUSA DUA, Indonesia - A station wagon full of explosives blew up yesterday in the horseshoe-shaped driveway between a Marriott hotel, a large restaurant and an office building in Jakarta, Indonesia's capital, killing at least 13 people and injuring nearly 150, many seriously. The blast devastated the restaurant, a popular gathering place for expatriates and wealthy Indonesians, which was full of people having lunch when the vehicle detonated. The explosion seriously damaged the lower floors of the 33-floor hotel and caused considerable damage to the office building, which houses the embassies of four Scandinavian countries and the Indonesian offices of many American companies.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | July 20, 2006
They've tried scrubbing the walls, deodorizing the drapes and using high-powered air cleaners and ozone treatment machines. But, the executives at Bethesda-based Marriott International Inc. say, nothing can truly eliminate the telltale odor of tobacco smoke in a hotel room. Yesterday, Marriott took the ultimate step, announcing that starting in September no smoking would be allowed anywhere in its 2,300 hotels in the United States and Canada - not in the 400,000 guest rooms, not in the bars, not in the restaurants, not even in the employee locker rooms.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1996
Host Marriott Corp. yesterday extended a $36 million offer to buy a controlling stake in a group that owns two upscale Florida hotels.By extending the offer until Jan. 10, the Bethesda-based lodging owner hopes to garner 45 percent ownership of Marriott Hotel Properties Ltd. Partnership. As of Friday -- the original deadline set by Host Marriott -- 39 percent of the partnership units had been tendered. Host Marriott is offering $80,000 per unit.The partnership owns the 1,503-room Marriott Orlando World Centre Hotel and a 50 percent interest in the 624-room Marriott Harbor Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1996
Host Marriott Corp. yesterday unveiled plans to acquire four upscale hotels for $92.5 million through an unusual transaction that involves buying out limited partners in a company set up eight years ago by the former Marriott Corp.The tender offer for units in Marriott Hotel Properties II Ltd. Partnership represents the first time that the Bethesda-based hotel owner has attempted to buy out limited partners to further its strategy of acquiring so-called full-service hotels.The offer is unusual in that Host Marriott, as general partner, technically controls Marriott Hotel Properties II and 29 other similar entities through agreements.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1996
Host Marriott Corp. yesterday offered $36 million to buy a controlling interest in a partnership that owns two Florida hotels, despite poor performances by the properties during the past five years.The Bethesda-based hotel owner's $80,000-per-share offering price for 45 percent of Marriott Hotel Properties Ltd. Partnership continues the owner's strategy of buying upscale properties at bargain prices.But the offer might also be Host Marriott's way of defusing a potential lawsuit. At least two other Marriott-sponsored partnerships have sued the company in the past year, contending Marriott has failed to live up to its obligations.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Staff Writer | January 21, 1993
Twenty-two members of a Rhode Island high school band that marched in President Clinton's Inauguration Day parade were hospitalized in Baltimore County last night when they became sick. None of the students -- seven boys and 15 girls -- is seriously ill. All were expected to be well enough to leave today for home.At least one adult supervisor also was ill, but he was treated by an ambulance crew at the Marriott Hotel at Hunt Valley where the group was staying.Ronald Flood, security chief at the Marriott Hotel, said 84 band members from Westerly High School in Westerly, R.I., and 14 adult supervisors left the hotel early yesterday morning in three tour buses bound for Washington.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1996
Host Marriott Corp. yesterday announced the acquisition of a thin majority of shares in a group that owns four upscale hotels, less than a week after a Delaware judge denied a motion that would have blocked the deal.The $56.5 million deal for 51 percent of the limited ownership shares in Marriott Hotel Properties II Ltd. Partnership, a group the Bethesda-based lodging owner created in 1988, is expected to consolidate Host Marriott's control and ability to profit from the 3,402 hotel rooms.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1996
Host Marriott Corp. has increased a bid to buy out limited partners in a group that controls four upscale hotels, even as it battles a lawsuit that claims the company failed to make an adequate offer for the partnership units.The Bethesda-based hotel owner said its decision to raise the offer by 20 percent -- to $150,000 per unit -- was not influenced by the litigation.Two Marriott Hotel Properties II Ltd. Partnership (MHP II) unitholders filing on behalf of the group claim the shares are worth at least $225,000 per unit based on the hotels' net operating income, according to documents filed in Delaware Chancery court.
NEWS
October 23, 2005
Aberdeen Warehouse replica planned at stadium What was a grassy hill just beyond right field during the Ripken World Series in August soon will be a 300-foot-long, 200-room Marriott hotel - a scale replica of the B&O Warehouse and a defining feature of the Cal Sr.'s Yard youth field. Baltimore developer H&S Properties will build the hotel that will occupy the warehouse. Part of it will be branded as Marriott's Residence Inn and part as Courtyard by Marriott. Bill Ripken, who was joined by his brother, retired Orioles All-Star Cal, and their mother, Vi, for the formal groundbreaking, called the hotel the "showpiece" of a virtual baseball city that will span 110 acres off Interstate 95 in Aberdeen.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2005
What was a grassy hill just beyond right field during the Ripken World Series in August soon will be a 300-foot-long, 200-room Marriott hotel - a scale replica of the B&O Warehouse and a defining feature of the Cal Sr.'s Yard youth field. A replica warehouse was always in the plans for Ripken's baseball complex outside Aberdeen, said Chris Flannery, Ripken Baseball's chief operating officer. But what would go in it was less clear. Baltimore developer H&S Properties will build the hotel that will occupy the warehouse.
NEWS
April 26, 2005
Luril D. Greene-Curtis, a hotel worker, died of a heart attack Thursday at Maryland General Hospital. The East Baltimore resident was 38. Born Luril D. Greene in Baltimore, she was raised on East Preston Street. After graduating in 1984 from the Institute of Notre Dame, she took at job with the FBI in Washington. In 1993, she became a hotel concierge at the Radisson Plaza Lord Baltimore. She later held a job in human resources at the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel and since last year had been working the front desk at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn. Mrs. Greene-Curtis enjoyed dancing, cooking and entertaining.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2004
It will be a stylish affair, suitable after an eight-year engagement. Latin bands will play. Crab cakes and martinis will be served. Jubilant officials will snip a festive ribbon. Twelve hundred invitations have been sent out for tomorrow's opening of Montgomery County's new conference center. Everyone is ready to celebrate -- except the one man who made the county wonder if it could ever throw this party. David H. Brown, 78, is a retired federal employee who taught himself case law to challenge the conference center in an extraordinary fight.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2004
A Howard County judge has tossed out a lawsuit seeking to hold a Columbia hotel accountable for the January 2001 shooting death of a teenager who attended a party there, saying the hotel was not obliged to protect the revelers from "unforeseeable criminal acts by a third party." The ruling, issued by Howard Circuit Judge James B. Dudley late last month, marked a second setback in efforts to hold someone culpable for the violent death of Long Reach High School senior Andre D. Corinaldi, 18. A Jessup man who had been charged in the shooting was acquitted of murder and other counts after an eight-day jury trial in September 2001.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2003
NUSA DUA, Indonesia - A station wagon full of explosives blew up yesterday in the horseshoe-shaped driveway between a Marriott hotel, a large restaurant and an office building in Jakarta, Indonesia's capital, killing at least 13 people and injuring nearly 150, many seriously. The blast devastated the restaurant, a popular gathering place for expatriates and wealthy Indonesians, which was full of people having lunch when the vehicle detonated. The explosion seriously damaged the lower floors of the 33-floor hotel and caused considerable damage to the office building, which houses the embassies of four Scandinavian countries and the Indonesian offices of many American companies.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1998
Bethesda-based Host Marriott Corp. said yesterday that it has acquired the 487-room Torrance Marriott Hotel in Torrance, Calif., from Nippon Total Finance for $52 million.Christopher J. Nassetta, Marriott's executive vice president and chief operating officer, said the Torrance hotel adds to the company's high-quality portfolio.The acquisition is the company's eighth this year."This is a bread-and-butter move for us in an attractive market," Nassetta said. "For the remainder of 1998, we will continue to selectively make more acquisitions that will enhance our value."
BUSINESS
By Mensah Dean and Mensah Dean,Staff Writer | August 19, 1992
With an aim toward ending the frustrating waits that often meet new guests, Marriott Corp. plans to introduce a service that would cut in half the time it takes to check into one of its hotels.The service, which has been in development for three years, is called "1st 10."It is "based on the premise that the first 10 minutes of a guest's hotel experience are the most important in setting the stage for a successful stay," the company said."1st 10" is a call-ahead reservation service for Marriott's customers.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2001
In a defeat for preservationists fighting to save the architecture of "The Wall Street of the South," developers of a Marriott hotel downtown say they will demolish today an 84-year-old building on Redwood Street that was the focus of protests and court battles. Razing the Sun Life building at 109 E. Redwood St., a six-story, beaux-arts style limestone structure with tall Corinthian columns and a rising sun at its peak, will mark the end of a more than yearlong battle that symbolized the philosophical clash between development and preservation in Baltimore's downtown.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2001
Less than two minutes after striding into the hotel guestroom, trailed by an entourage of executives, William T. Walsh spotted his pet peeve. The seam on the bedside lampshade faced front, in plain sight. Surely, the typical hotel guest wouldn't think twice about it. But for the general manager of the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, such imperfection would not do. Not as he prepared for today's opening of the 750-room hotel in Inner Harbor East, or on any other day. You'd think the head of Baltimore's first major new hotel in a decade - one long anticipated by the city and tourism and convention leaders -might leave such details to his managers and their staffs.
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