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TRAVEL
By Sheila Young and Sheila Young,Sun Staff | October 6, 2002
Margaret Williams' children had it made when they decided to get married. Williams is a Columbia event planner whose business consists mostly of weddings. She had the local contacts, knew the caterers, the great spots for a ceremony. But both her children opted instead for destination weddings. Her son got married at a resort in Florida. Her daughter chose Charlottesville, Va., home of the University of Virginia, where she and her fiance went to school. "For the family, personally, it was much more fun," Williams said.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2003
At 93, Harriet Kennedy isn't so good with dates and places anymore, but she can recall in detail her wedding to Robert Kennedy, now 96, nearly three-quarters of a century ago. "It was a beautiful summer day - July 30, 1929," she said in her home on Putty Hill Avenue in Parkville, which the couple has owned for five decades. "It was nice and warm." Yesterday, the Kennedys were honored at a World Marriage Day Mass as the longest-married couple - at 73 years - in the Archdiocese of Baltimore.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 22, 1997
Critics are going to have to find a new poster program for crude taste, because Fox is finally canceling "Married With Children," the longest-running sitcom on network television.The blue-collar sitcom that mocked working-class folk just celebrated its 10th anniversary this month as the series that launched prime-time programming on Fox.The Bundys -- husband Al (Ed O'Neill), wife Peg (Katey Sagal) and teen-age kids Bud (David Faustino) and Kelly (Christina Applegate) -- were conceived as an anti-family in 1986 for the network that thought of itself as the counter-network.
FEATURES
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2002
CLARKSBURG - All the children came in for the wedding yesterday: The groom's three, the bride's four, even 10 of the grandchildren. They came here to northwestern Montgomery County, to a secluded farmhouse near the small crossroads of Clarksburg, from as far away as Mississippi, Missouri, Texas, Nebraska, California, New Zealand. And they came not because the bride is 84 and the groom is 88 but because Mary Beth Beck and Glen Pearson reared them to recognize love, to value marriage, to be grateful for both.
FEATURES
By Regina Barreca | March 21, 1993
"I never feel more married than I do on a Sunday, and I never like it less."So says my friend Mark, a high school teacher in his early 40s, who has been what I would call "happily married" for a little more than 10 years. But on Sundays, he says, he is often overwhelmed by a sense of life's having passed him by. He is antsy, unsettled and uneasy. He reports becoming wistful, sentimental and prone to bouts of regrets."I love my life," he explained, "but sometimes I wonder whether there's another woman out there who I would have loved even more.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
Who will come out of the closet on the Feb. 20 episode of "The Simpsons"? Here are the odds for five of the show's characters, from the Internet betting site PaddyPower.com. James Dobson has his work cut out for him. Last week, the conservative flame-thrower denounced SpongeBob SquarePants - the harmless cartoon sponge who holds hands with his friends and lives in an underwater pineapple - for appearing in a "pro-homosexual video." Next month, a regular character on The Simpsons will come out and be married in a same-sex wedding.
TRAVEL
By BARBARA SHEA and BARBARA SHEA,NEWSDAY | February 14, 1999
The perfect honeymoon takes as many shapes as the perfect honey.Almost every lodging in the world offers some sort of romantic package or can invent one at a moment's notice with a quick call to the florist. In general, amenities range from ``Just Married'' T-shirts and a bottle of bubbly to moonlight sails (common in Florida and the Caribbean) and heart-shaped beds or tubs (a trademark of the Poconos and Niagara Falls).Geri Bain, travel editor of Modern Bride magazine, says the weddings-away business is ``growing really fast.
FEATURES
By Norine Lovett Schiller | February 11, 1996
Whenever I tell people this love story, they get misty-eyed and sigh, "It's just like a movie."It won't ruin the ending for you if I say right away that the couple the story, my parents, did get married, and quite a long time ago at that. Some happy endings are simply happy beginnings, after all.My parents met and married in Sicily during World War II. Last year they celebrated 50 years of marriage. For most people that would be happy ending enough, but not for me. From the beginning of the year, I worked hard to persuade my parents to celebrate their 50th anniversary in Italy, with all their family around them.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | February 5, 1995
As someone who has always admired the nesting instinct in birds and small mammals but never understood the same impulses in humans, I should have viewed the idea of getting married -- and merging two households -- with some foreboding.But it was a first marriage for both of us, and though my husband and I were by most standards getting married at a late age, I, at least, was naive.I didn't give moving into his house of many years a second thought.This'll be interesting, said my brother and sister, who have been married for years.
FEATURES
By Nigel Dempster and Peter Evans and Nigel Dempster and Peter Evans,Distributed by Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 7, 1993
In Part Two of a five-part excerpt from "Behind Palace Doors: Marriage and Divorce in the House of Windsor" by Nigel Dempster and Peter Evans, Prince Charles' grandmother, the queen mother, maneuvers her grandson into marrying her protege, Lady Diana Spencer.Sacrifice is the essence of commitment, Charles' beloved grandmother, Elizabeth, had told him, just as firmly as she had told his mother that her work was "the rent for the room you occupy on earth." They were more than tracts she expected to be honored, it was the faith she shed: It was the resin that held the royal family together.
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