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Marriage Of Figaro

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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 22, 2001
For a mix of humor, sentiment and truth, Mozart's "The Marriage of Figaro" remains impossible to beat. The sight gags are as reliable for a laugh as those in "I Love Lucy" reruns. And when the Countess tells us about the ache in her heart over a faithless husband she still hopelessly loves, or when that louse of a spouse finally begs forgiveness, Mozart transcends the artifice of theater to uncover the very nature of human relations. And then there is the music - effortless, indelible melodies that communicate jokes and emotions with equal suppleness; orchestration that exudes as much color and subtlety as a Fragonard painting.
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August 21, 2009
PAUL "DUKE" HOGUE, 69 Cincinnati, Baltimore basketball star Paul "Duke" Hogue, a star center on the University of Cincinnati's back-to-back national championship basketball teams, died Monday in Cincinnati of heart and kidney failure, said Patti Hogue, his wife of 43 years. The 6-foot-9-inch center helped lead the Bearcats to NCAA championships in 1961 and 1962, both times defeating Jerry Lucas-led Ohio State squads in the title games. Mr. Hogue was chosen the most outstanding player in the 1962 NCAA tournament.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 15, 1998
Quibble with this or that, but when all is said and done, opera is about glorious singing. When the voices are there, you can live with all the other stuff that might go wrong.By this standard, the Annapolis Opera's recent production of Mozart's "Marriage of Figaro" was a rousing success. Wherever you turned, you heard talented young singers doing wonderful things with Mozart's exquisite melodies and characters.In Thomas Zielinski, the production had a top-notch Figaro whose tonal depth gave opera's most celebrated valet the guts to tell off his aristocratic employer with stylish conviction in "Se vuol ballare," but whose agility made the tough coloratura passages in Act IV's "Tutto e disposto" dance with expertly controlled energy.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | November 18, 2006
Peel away the surfaces of Mozart's peerless comic opera The Marriage of Figaro and you can find some dark things going on. Poor Figaro learns that he was born out-of-wedlock. And his fiancee, Susanna, has to keep fighting off the pursuits of a philandering aristocrat who thinks someone passed an Offence to Marriage Act that entitles him to bed any bride before the groom. If you go Peabody Opera Theatre performs The Marriage of Figaro at 7:30 tonight and 3 p.m. tomorrow at Peabody Institute, 17 E. Mount Vernon Place.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | November 18, 2006
Peel away the surfaces of Mozart's peerless comic opera The Marriage of Figaro and you can find some dark things going on. Poor Figaro learns that he was born out-of-wedlock. And his fiancee, Susanna, has to keep fighting off the pursuits of a philandering aristocrat who thinks someone passed an Offence to Marriage Act that entitles him to bed any bride before the groom. If you go Peabody Opera Theatre performs The Marriage of Figaro at 7:30 tonight and 3 p.m. tomorrow at Peabody Institute, 17 E. Mount Vernon Place.
FEATURES
May 1, 2006
May 1--1786: Mozart's opera The Marriage of Figaro premiered in Vienna, Austria. 1931: New York's Empire State Building was dedicated. 1948: The People's Democratic Republic of Korea (North Korea) was proclaimed. 1971: Amtrak - which combined 18 intercity passenger railroads - went into service.
NEWS
November 25, 1993
One of the women who served as the inspiration for the film "A League of Their Own" will be the featured speaker at a Dec. 7 breakfast sponsored by the Greater Severna Park Chamber of Commerce.The breakfast is set for 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at the Severna Park Library on McKinsey Road.The guest speaker will be Dr. Florence Blanck of the Severna Park Chiropractic Center, who played in the All American Girls Baseball League, which was featured in the movie. The league was formed during World War II, when many major league baseball players were in the armed forces.
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By Robert Haskins | November 23, 1991
Drastic cuts in state funding forced the Peabody Conservatory to stage Mozart's "Marriage of Figaro" without sets, save for a few simple doorways and furniture.But make no mistake. In every other way, this is a spirited, professional production which well serves the reputation of the nationally known music school.Much of the credit for that success, surely, must rest with Roger Brunyate, who has made Mozart a staple of Peabody's opera program since becoming its artistic director in 1980. This "Figaro" is functional but elegant -- and after seeing the "hip" vagaries of Peter Sellars' Mozart operas, Mr. Brunyate's vision is infinitely more attractive.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 20, 1991
In life, furniture tends to be -- or should be -- less important than human beings. Sometimes one simply can't afford furniture, but that doesn't mean that one ceases to live. Roger Brunyate, the director of the Peabody Conservatory's Opera Theatre, figures it works that way in Mozart, too.That's the reason Brunyate's production of "The Marriage of Figaro" will be a stripped-down affair this week. In September, when he realized the state was about to slash its budget (which includes funds for Peabody)
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2006
Mozart's 250th birthday celebration continued with verve last weekend as the Annapolis Chorale and Annapolis Chamber Orchestra ran the gamut from symphony to opera to ballet to choral work in an evening that spanned Mozart's career. The program, led by the Annapolis Chorale's J. Ernest Green, started with Mozart's Symphony No. 1, composed at age 8, and than covered an opera, The Impresario, from his late-middle career; a ballet excerpt from The Marriage of Figaro from the same period; and Requiem, his final work.
FEATURES
May 1, 2006
May 1--1786: Mozart's opera The Marriage of Figaro premiered in Vienna, Austria. 1931: New York's Empire State Building was dedicated. 1948: The People's Democratic Republic of Korea (North Korea) was proclaimed. 1971: Amtrak - which combined 18 intercity passenger railroads - went into service.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2006
Mozart's 250th birthday celebration continued with verve last weekend as the Annapolis Chorale and Annapolis Chamber Orchestra ran the gamut from symphony to opera to ballet to choral work in an evening that spanned Mozart's career. The program, led by the Annapolis Chorale's J. Ernest Green, started with Mozart's Symphony No. 1, composed at age 8, and than covered an opera, The Impresario, from his late-middle career; a ballet excerpt from The Marriage of Figaro from the same period; and Requiem, his final work.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 15, 2005
In 1786, when it was new, Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro represented a fresh set of operatic values for an audience and a fresh set of artistic challenges for performers. Here was a comedy that wasn't strictly for laughs, but had lots of heart, too. And here was an opera that required singers to act with every bit as much inspiration and conviction as they could muster for the music. In many ways, Figaro transformed the opera world, setting a new standard for what composers and librettists could create together, what a cast could achieve together.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | March 6, 2005
Human beings will always be good for a laugh, especially when they're in full pursuit of sex. This makes them a continual subject for low, lower and lowest-brow entertainment -- check out almost any TV sitcom today for a demonstration. More brain cell-active studies of this behavior can, of course, produce valuable insights alongside the chuckles. Occasionally, as in the comedies of Shakespeare, an observer of these mortal fools will even fashion from their foibles the stuff of real art. And once in a great, great while -- only once in the past 219 years, I would argue -- the human condition can inspire the creation of something not just amusing, but profoundly rewarding and impossibly beautiful.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2002
Today marks an auspicious event in South County - the launching of a concert series at London Town House and Gardens in Edgewater. Patterned after the European concept of individually sponsored concerts in elegant surroundings, all three concerts in the series will be held on the banks of South River at the historic site. Wallace Treiber, president of the South County Concert Association, and Carol Treiber, executive director of the Cultural Arts Foundation, will sponsor tonight's concert to start the series.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 22, 2001
For a mix of humor, sentiment and truth, Mozart's "The Marriage of Figaro" remains impossible to beat. The sight gags are as reliable for a laugh as those in "I Love Lucy" reruns. And when the Countess tells us about the ache in her heart over a faithless husband she still hopelessly loves, or when that louse of a spouse finally begs forgiveness, Mozart transcends the artifice of theater to uncover the very nature of human relations. And then there is the music - effortless, indelible melodies that communicate jokes and emotions with equal suppleness; orchestration that exudes as much color and subtlety as a Fragonard painting.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2002
Today marks an auspicious event in South County - the launching of a concert series at London Town House and Gardens in Edgewater. Patterned after the European concept of individually sponsored concerts in elegant surroundings, all three concerts in the series will be held on the banks of South River at the historic site. Wallace Treiber, president of the South County Concert Association, and Carol Treiber, executive director of the Cultural Arts Foundation, will sponsor tonight's concert to start the series.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 28, 1999
Carrying a tune wasn't a criteria for playing a famous opera role at the 26th annual Annapolis Opera Gala. Instead of formal wear, some of the 125 guests came in costumes (rented from the opera company) to the benefit at the U.S. Naval Academy Officers Club.Opera president Anna Marie Darlington-Gilmour took on "Tosca" togs. Opera guild president Frances O'Brien was made up as Madame Butterfly. Anne Arundel Community College adjunct professor Mary Coleman and naval architect Jim Coleman borrowed from "La Boheme," as did silent auction co-chair Lesley Robinson.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 15, 1998
Quibble with this or that, but when all is said and done, opera is about glorious singing. When the voices are there, you can live with all the other stuff that might go wrong.By this standard, the Annapolis Opera's recent production of Mozart's "Marriage of Figaro" was a rousing success. Wherever you turned, you heard talented young singers doing wonderful things with Mozart's exquisite melodies and characters.In Thomas Zielinski, the production had a top-notch Figaro whose tonal depth gave opera's most celebrated valet the guts to tell off his aristocratic employer with stylish conviction in "Se vuol ballare," but whose agility made the tough coloratura passages in Act IV's "Tutto e disposto" dance with expertly controlled energy.
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