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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | November 9, 2003
The minute the season's first cranberries appear in my local grocery, I reach for a package. The crimson-hued berries, which are sold fresh in the fall, are a favorite of mine and have been the inspiration for many interesting recipes. I've combined them with port to make a sauce for roasted pork tenderloins, cooked them with sugar and orange juice to use as a glaze for wine-poached pears and made countless cranberry chutneys and relishes to accompany my holiday turkey. This year I've added cranberry cherry marmalade to my repertoire.
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
As a child, chef and cooking instructor Nikki McGowan of CKCS Foods Studio loved Thanksgiving. “Thanksgiving holds for me my fondest culinary memories,” she says. “The smell of pumpkin pie spice reminds me of my mom every time I encounter it.” However, Nikki's memories of the day after Thanksgiving aren't so pleasant: She dreaded the return of dry, bland leftover turkey sandwiches. Here, she punches up the traditional post-Thanksgiving sandwich with a healthy smear of cream cheese and dollops of tart cranberry sauce and orange marmalade.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2009
Standing O's current production of "Mr. Marmalade" is the edgiest and most complex in its two-year history. Founder and artistic director Ron Giddings offers audiences this black comedy, which enters unknown theatrical territory to provide an entertaining and disturbing evening. In 2004, at age 25, playwright Noah Haidle premiered his savage comedy in Los Angeles exploring how irresponsible parenting can damage children. In his director's notes, Giddings recalls seeing the play in 2005 when it ran off-Broadway at the Roundabout Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
At 10 p.m. on a recent Thursday night, Red Maple, the lounge in Mount Vernon, was as quiet as an Old West movie town before a gunfight. Even the tumbleweeds were away, possibly pre-gaming somewhere else. Then, at 10:30 p.m. on the dot, like Daniel Craig in "Cowboys & Aliens," the crowds materialized as if out of nowhere, looking just as surprised to be there. The reason for the sudden change was the lounge's special that night: an open bar until 11 p.m. Yuengling and rail vodkas flew from the behind the bar as an overburdened bartender struggled to keep up with demand.
NEWS
September 20, 2007
It was bad enough when the cow suggested to the dairymaid who suggested to the queen who suggested to the king that marmalade might be nicer than a little bit of butter for his bread - only to have the king insist on butter. But at least in A. A. Milne's heavily rhythmic poem, "The King's Breakfast," a child can be delighted by the short and emphatic rhymes, and perhaps excuse the king - who must be an eccentric character, anyway, or he wouldn't be king at all - for preferring butter, which is OK, to marmalade, which is infinitely better, because it's sweet and tangy and sort of bitter and sticky all at the same time.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | March 27, 1991
Three-Fruit Haroseth1 medium pear, cored and cut up1 medium apple, cored and cut up1 banana, sliced1/4 cup chopped walnuts2 tablespoons orange marmalade2 tablespoons brandy2 teaspoons lemon juice1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamonIn a blender container or food processor bowl combine all ingredients. Cover and blend or process until combined. Cover and chill for up to two weeks. Serve with matzo, muffins, bagels, toast or crackers. Makes 1 1/3 cups.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | August 26, 2004
Gorge yourself at Sofi's Crepes Where: 1723 N. Charles St. When: 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, noon-8 p.m. Sundays. Why: Crepes are great, but laziness often keeps us from making them ourselves. Which is why we're so excited about Sofi's Crepes - a newish pint-sized cafe next to the Charles Theatre that serves the sweet and savory varieties. Popular choices include the ham, gruyere and Dijon mustard crepe and the sliced turkey, pesto mayo and cranberry chutney concoction. Of the sweeter sort, they serve a popular banana royal crepe with bananas and butterscotch sauce.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | June 27, 1995
I remember years ago, laughing at a comic strip character having a noise war with popcorn-crunching movie-goers by munching carrots, celery and other really loud raw vegetables. While not quite in a league with Buck Rogers for predicting amazing future events, our hero's vision has at last come true.I got to enjoy the opening night of "Bridges of Madison County" while noshing assorted fresh veggies and dip, fresh apples, pears and strawberries with brie, a glass of red wine and a grilled chicken Caesar salad.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Richardson and Cameron Barry and David Richardson and Cameron Barry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2001
IN CREPE Du Jour, owner/chef Mustapha Snoussi and his wife, Donna Morris-Snoussi, have created a little piece of France that's so appealing even Anne Tyler's Accidental Tourist would be at ease. Leaving aside the crepes suzettes, salade nicoise, croques monsieurs, assiettes des crudites and other well-made French cafe specialties, they have managed, through charm and creativity, to combine many of the most adorable aspects of French culture and exclude all of those with which Americans tend to lose patience.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and By Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 2005
It's Friday night at one of Baltimore's trendy new dining spots, Pazo, and the hip, well-heeled patrons who've come to mingle, sip cocktails and nosh on assorted "small plates" of nouveau, Mediterranean- influenced fare likely have no idea that there's a culinary star in the open-air kitchen. We're not talking about executive chef Peter Livolsi - though he and his team whip up bite-sized morsels of heaven on a plate. No, the celebrity would be the onion, a veritable vegetable powerhouse, invariably at the heart of most delicious cuisine.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2009
Standing O's current production of "Mr. Marmalade" is the edgiest and most complex in its two-year history. Founder and artistic director Ron Giddings offers audiences this black comedy, which enters unknown theatrical territory to provide an entertaining and disturbing evening. In 2004, at age 25, playwright Noah Haidle premiered his savage comedy in Los Angeles exploring how irresponsible parenting can damage children. In his director's notes, Giddings recalls seeing the play in 2005 when it ran off-Broadway at the Roundabout Theatre.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | September 3, 2008
The right orange marmalade can make the hurried breakfasts of back-to-school season a bit brighter. We tasted three available locally, looking for the right texture - not too stiff, not too goopy - and lots of orange peel. Best Bite and Best Bargain McCutcheon's Sweet: Orange Marmalade: 20 ounces for $4.99 This local marmalade was our unanimous favorite for its balance of citrus and sweetness and generous amount of orange peel. The price was right, too. Also Tasted James Keiller & Son: Dundee Orange Marmalade: 16 ounces for $8.49 This marmalade is named for an 18th-century Scottish importer who came into a windfall of bitter Seville oranges from a Spanish ship that took shelter in a nearby port.
NEWS
September 20, 2007
It was bad enough when the cow suggested to the dairymaid who suggested to the queen who suggested to the king that marmalade might be nicer than a little bit of butter for his bread - only to have the king insist on butter. But at least in A. A. Milne's heavily rhythmic poem, "The King's Breakfast," a child can be delighted by the short and emphatic rhymes, and perhaps excuse the king - who must be an eccentric character, anyway, or he wouldn't be king at all - for preferring butter, which is OK, to marmalade, which is infinitely better, because it's sweet and tangy and sort of bitter and sticky all at the same time.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens and By Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 2005
It's Friday night at one of Baltimore's trendy new dining spots, Pazo, and the hip, well-heeled patrons who've come to mingle, sip cocktails and nosh on assorted "small plates" of nouveau, Mediterranean- influenced fare likely have no idea that there's a culinary star in the open-air kitchen. We're not talking about executive chef Peter Livolsi - though he and his team whip up bite-sized morsels of heaven on a plate. No, the celebrity would be the onion, a veritable vegetable powerhouse, invariably at the heart of most delicious cuisine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | August 26, 2004
Gorge yourself at Sofi's Crepes Where: 1723 N. Charles St. When: 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, noon-8 p.m. Sundays. Why: Crepes are great, but laziness often keeps us from making them ourselves. Which is why we're so excited about Sofi's Crepes - a newish pint-sized cafe next to the Charles Theatre that serves the sweet and savory varieties. Popular choices include the ham, gruyere and Dijon mustard crepe and the sliced turkey, pesto mayo and cranberry chutney concoction. Of the sweeter sort, they serve a popular banana royal crepe with bananas and butterscotch sauce.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2004
Jane Spencer of Baltimore is seeking a recipe for tomato marmalade. She writes, "It is a specialty of a gourmet friend but has been lost to us now for 10 years." Lorraine Van Drimmelen of Salem, Ore., responded with the recipe. Recipe request Shawn Melnikoff of Severna Park is seeking a recipe for a "squash casserole like the one served at the Boston Market." If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request for a hard-to-find recipe, write to Ellen Hawks, Recipe Finder, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278.
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | November 23, 1991
Hardy-orangeBotanical name: Pancirus trifoliataPronunciation: pon-SY-rusFamily: Rutaceae (Rue family)Origin: Central and north ChinaClass: ShrubDisplay period: Year-roundHeight: 8 to 20 feetEnvironment: SunFor meanness, the hardy-orange is just about in a class by itself. Its stout, daggerlike thorns, some 4 inches long, are so formidable they're spoken of as "almost lethal to the touch." Pruning is no picnic, as you might imagine. Nor is a hedge of it likely to be invaded by intruders.The thorns, though, are the very things that sell the hardy-orange (or trifoliate orange, as the shrub is otherwise called)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 23, 2001
Last fall, in the Perigord, a region in southwestern France, I picked up a little jar of balsamic onion marmalade with a handwritten label. In an attempt to duplicate the recipe, I sauteed chopped onions in a small amount of butter and sugar until soft and brown, then added balsamic vinegar, red wine and dark raisins to the pan. The onions were cooked several minutes more until the vinegar and wine had almost evaporated and the mixture was glistening and...
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | November 9, 2003
The minute the season's first cranberries appear in my local grocery, I reach for a package. The crimson-hued berries, which are sold fresh in the fall, are a favorite of mine and have been the inspiration for many interesting recipes. I've combined them with port to make a sauce for roasted pork tenderloins, cooked them with sugar and orange juice to use as a glaze for wine-poached pears and made countless cranberry chutneys and relishes to accompany my holiday turkey. This year I've added cranberry cherry marmalade to my repertoire.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 23, 2001
Last fall, in the Perigord, a region in southwestern France, I picked up a little jar of balsamic onion marmalade with a handwritten label. In an attempt to duplicate the recipe, I sauteed chopped onions in a small amount of butter and sugar until soft and brown, then added balsamic vinegar, red wine and dark raisins to the pan. The onions were cooked several minutes more until the vinegar and wine had almost evaporated and the mixture was glistening and...
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