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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - Marlon and Shawn Wayans would like to offer a warning for those who aspire to remain on the cutting edge of comedy: Keep the No-Doz handy. As a bleary-eyed Marlon can attest, skewering current events is not for the chronically fatigued, especially when your chosen medium is the movies. The day before, he was in Los Angeles, filming a new gag to be included in "Scary Movie 2." The film opened Wednesday, and in most cases, that would mean filming was finished weeks or months ago. That's not the case, however, when a premium is put on keeping the material fresh.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 9, 2007
As he shows in Dreamgirls, Eddie Murphy may have a sensational future as an actor. But when playing multiple characters in farcical vehicles like Norbit, Murphy has begun to wear out his welcome. His only recent comedy hits have taken him from the crazy Eddie of the Nutty Professor films to the fresh-as-a-daisy Eddie of the Dr. Dolittle films. Now we get a lazy Eddie in Norbit, a lackluster attempt to make a gross-out romantic comedy. When I say lazy Eddie, I mean imaginatively lazy. Murphy plays three roles: the lovably shy orphan Norbit, his enormous wife Rasputia and Mr. Wong, the owner of the Golden Won Ton restaurant and orphanage.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 20, 1998
Cheap, boneheaded comedy reaches new depths with "Senseless," and that's a compliment.Face it. Some people go to the movies to travel to unknown worlds, some to learn universal human truths, some to connect better with their fellow man.Then there are those filmgoers for whom nothing is more entertaining than a good loud burp. The more sexist, scatological, infantile and tasteless the humor, the better.And make no mistake, it's not just adolescents and Joe Sixpack who flock to these exploitation comedies: college professors, heads of state, even some film critics count "Police Academy" and its spawn among their guilty pleasures.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 14, 2006
Little Man must set the record for most kicked-in-the-groin jokes in one movie. I lost count after the first dozen, lost hope after it happened three times in rapid succession to the same guy. So, yes, the movie relies on stupid humor, on the lowest forms of slapstick, on gags calculated to make audiences gag. But that shouldn't surprise anyone. This is, after all, the work of the Wayans Brothers - stars Marlon and Shawn, director Keenen Ivory, whose last film, White Chicks, didn't exactly avoid low humor.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 14, 2006
Little Man must set the record for most kicked-in-the-groin jokes in one movie. I lost count after the first dozen, lost hope after it happened three times in rapid succession to the same guy. So, yes, the movie relies on stupid humor, on the lowest forms of slapstick, on gags calculated to make audiences gag. But that shouldn't surprise anyone. This is, after all, the work of the Wayans Brothers - stars Marlon and Shawn, director Keenen Ivory, whose last film, White Chicks, didn't exactly avoid low humor.
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By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | January 17, 1996
This sendup of 'hood movies feels about as funny -- and as long -- as its title.If there is potential in a film that ridicules the John Singleton-styled black-men-are-doomed movies like "Poetic Justice," "Jungle Fever" and "Straight Out of Brooklyn," "Don't Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood" squanders it on a series of repetitive gags and sexist jokes. What chuckles there are -- the young teen-age hero's name is Ashtray (Shawn Wayans), his father is also a teen-ager, his best friend is Loc Dog (Marlon Wayans)
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2000
"Dungeons & Dragons" likely will be to its young stars what film dud "Leprechaun" is to Jennifer Aniston - that embarrassingly terrible early flick that people forever will bring up to mock the depths to which you once sank just to make it to the big screen. And it's a pity, because the '80s game is so wildly creative that it had the potential to be a great movie stuffed with super-cool special effects in the style of "The Matrix." Instead, director Courtney Solomon's "D&D" is more like a sub-par after-school TV special with bad acting, worse lines and not much else.
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 17, 2004
If some of the funniest guys in Hollywood - the Coen Brothers, Tom Hanks and Marlon Wayans - couldn't remake a hit out of the 1955 Brit comedy The Ladykillers, what prayer do the hacks who stick National Lampoon in front of their movie titles have? That would be "no prayer." If National Lampoon's Gold Diggers had a single laugh, it would die of loneliness. The comedy represents a new nadir for the Lampoon brand. John Belushi isn't hanging out in Animal House anymore and Van Wilder (2002)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 28, 1997
On the weekend of the last spin of the Big Dance, as those witty sports writers so cleverly call it, here's an enjoyable little jitterbug that's not nearly as impressive as a waltz or a minuet, but has the lightness of a tap dance and the sparkling flash of a do-si-do at a --Yeah, all right.Anyhow, "The Sixth Man" is a mild romp at the expense of college basketball and the NCAA tournament; it hasn't a surprise anywhere in its feeble grasp, but amuses on the strength of its antic performances, its surprisingly accurate sense of milieu (Dick Vitale, John Thompson, Bill Walton and various crowds appear briefly as themselves)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 4, 2001
Here's an amusing little conundrum: "Scary Movie 2" is filled with humor most people stop guffawing at around age 14, but its R rating means most of the adolescents it's aimed at won't be allowed into the theaters. And that conundrum might be the most amusing thing about this sequel to last summer's surprise mega-hit, "Scary Movie," which at least contained enough inspired moments to forgive the multitude of lowbrow cinematic sins surrounding them. There were times when "Scary Movie" was seriously twisted, and achingly funny.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 17, 2004
If some of the funniest guys in Hollywood - the Coen Brothers, Tom Hanks and Marlon Wayans - couldn't remake a hit out of the 1955 Brit comedy The Ladykillers, what prayer do the hacks who stick National Lampoon in front of their movie titles have? That would be "no prayer." If National Lampoon's Gold Diggers had a single laugh, it would die of loneliness. The comedy represents a new nadir for the Lampoon brand. John Belushi isn't hanging out in Animal House anymore and Van Wilder (2002)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 23, 2004
There's a great idea at the heart of White Chicks, one its mak- ers seems somehow afraid of. That seems unlikely, given the movie is a brainchild of the redoubtable Wayans family, a comedic font known for both outrageousness and hilarity. As raunchy as the Wayans' Scary Movie franchise may have been, its anarchic spirit was suffused with moments of undeniable - and gut-busting - genius. But White Chicks, the story of two black FBI agents who, desperate to save their jobs, disguise themselves as two white socialites, seems to have its foot constantly on the brake.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - Marlon and Shawn Wayans would like to offer a warning for those who aspire to remain on the cutting edge of comedy: Keep the No-Doz handy. As a bleary-eyed Marlon can attest, skewering current events is not for the chronically fatigued, especially when your chosen medium is the movies. The day before, he was in Los Angeles, filming a new gag to be included in "Scary Movie 2." The film opened Wednesday, and in most cases, that would mean filming was finished weeks or months ago. That's not the case, however, when a premium is put on keeping the material fresh.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 4, 2001
Here's an amusing little conundrum: "Scary Movie 2" is filled with humor most people stop guffawing at around age 14, but its R rating means most of the adolescents it's aimed at won't be allowed into the theaters. And that conundrum might be the most amusing thing about this sequel to last summer's surprise mega-hit, "Scary Movie," which at least contained enough inspired moments to forgive the multitude of lowbrow cinematic sins surrounding them. There were times when "Scary Movie" was seriously twisted, and achingly funny.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2000
"Dungeons & Dragons" likely will be to its young stars what film dud "Leprechaun" is to Jennifer Aniston - that embarrassingly terrible early flick that people forever will bring up to mock the depths to which you once sank just to make it to the big screen. And it's a pity, because the '80s game is so wildly creative that it had the potential to be a great movie stuffed with super-cool special effects in the style of "The Matrix." Instead, director Courtney Solomon's "D&D" is more like a sub-par after-school TV special with bad acting, worse lines and not much else.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 20, 1998
Cheap, boneheaded comedy reaches new depths with "Senseless," and that's a compliment.Face it. Some people go to the movies to travel to unknown worlds, some to learn universal human truths, some to connect better with their fellow man.Then there are those filmgoers for whom nothing is more entertaining than a good loud burp. The more sexist, scatological, infantile and tasteless the humor, the better.And make no mistake, it's not just adolescents and Joe Sixpack who flock to these exploitation comedies: college professors, heads of state, even some film critics count "Police Academy" and its spawn among their guilty pleasures.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 23, 2004
There's a great idea at the heart of White Chicks, one its mak- ers seems somehow afraid of. That seems unlikely, given the movie is a brainchild of the redoubtable Wayans family, a comedic font known for both outrageousness and hilarity. As raunchy as the Wayans' Scary Movie franchise may have been, its anarchic spirit was suffused with moments of undeniable - and gut-busting - genius. But White Chicks, the story of two black FBI agents who, desperate to save their jobs, disguise themselves as two white socialites, seems to have its foot constantly on the brake.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 9, 2007
As he shows in Dreamgirls, Eddie Murphy may have a sensational future as an actor. But when playing multiple characters in farcical vehicles like Norbit, Murphy has begun to wear out his welcome. His only recent comedy hits have taken him from the crazy Eddie of the Nutty Professor films to the fresh-as-a-daisy Eddie of the Dr. Dolittle films. Now we get a lazy Eddie in Norbit, a lackluster attempt to make a gross-out romantic comedy. When I say lazy Eddie, I mean imaginatively lazy. Murphy plays three roles: the lovably shy orphan Norbit, his enormous wife Rasputia and Mr. Wong, the owner of the Golden Won Ton restaurant and orphanage.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 28, 1997
On the weekend of the last spin of the Big Dance, as those witty sports writers so cleverly call it, here's an enjoyable little jitterbug that's not nearly as impressive as a waltz or a minuet, but has the lightness of a tap dance and the sparkling flash of a do-si-do at a --Yeah, all right.Anyhow, "The Sixth Man" is a mild romp at the expense of college basketball and the NCAA tournament; it hasn't a surprise anywhere in its feeble grasp, but amuses on the strength of its antic performances, its surprisingly accurate sense of milieu (Dick Vitale, John Thompson, Bill Walton and various crowds appear briefly as themselves)
FEATURES
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | January 17, 1996
This sendup of 'hood movies feels about as funny -- and as long -- as its title.If there is potential in a film that ridicules the John Singleton-styled black-men-are-doomed movies like "Poetic Justice," "Jungle Fever" and "Straight Out of Brooklyn," "Don't Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood" squanders it on a series of repetitive gags and sexist jokes. What chuckles there are -- the young teen-age hero's name is Ashtray (Shawn Wayans), his father is also a teen-ager, his best friend is Loc Dog (Marlon Wayans)
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