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Marlin Fitzwater

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | July 29, 2001
Esther's Pillow, by Marlin Fitzwater. PublicAffairs. 242 pages. $25. Marlin Fitzwater handled the media for the White House during the administrations of Ronald Reagan and George Bush. He still lives in the Washington, D.C., area, but he has never forgotten his Abilene, Kan., roots. Those roots led to this novel, Fitzwater's first. The plot is based on events of 1911 involving Marlin's great-uncle Jay Fitzwater and great-grandfather the Rev. Levi Fitzwater. It is not a pretty story, and, until recently, Fitzwater had no idea such shame had befallen an ancestor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | July 29, 2001
Esther's Pillow, by Marlin Fitzwater. PublicAffairs. 242 pages. $25. Marlin Fitzwater handled the media for the White House during the administrations of Ronald Reagan and George Bush. He still lives in the Washington, D.C., area, but he has never forgotten his Abilene, Kan., roots. Those roots led to this novel, Fitzwater's first. The plot is based on events of 1911 involving Marlin's great-uncle Jay Fitzwater and great-grandfather the Rev. Levi Fitzwater. It is not a pretty story, and, until recently, Fitzwater had no idea such shame had befallen an ancestor.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 11, 1992
WASHINGTON -- One day after George Bush appeared to renew his 1988 no-new-taxes pledge, the White House yesterday insisted that the president didn't mean he would never raise taxes.Campaigning in New Jersey Wednesday, Mr. Bush said "I went along with one Democratic tax increase and I'm not going to do it again. Ever. Ever."But yesterday morning, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said the president's statement "wasn't a pledge, no. He was saying, as he's said before, that he wouldn't make that mistake again."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Kirsten Scharnberg | December 19, 1999
In a small-town greasy spoon where the house special is a fried oyster sandwich and a waitress named June doles out kisses with coffee, three old friends gather to brag about the glory days, when they were household names who saw the limelight's spectacular glare from the best seats in the house.The first man weaves stories of presidents.The second, of kings.And the third, of far-off lands, well-loved astronauts and international intrigue."When President Bush and I were in the Middle East for Thanksgiving ..."
NEWS
By Leslie H. Gelb | January 10, 1991
MARLIN FITZWATER reached near-highs of understatement and wishful thinking in responding to threats of a Soviet crackdown against deserters and draft-dodgers in seven rebellious republics.Although administration officials are hoping for a Gorbachevian miracle, everything is much worse than the White House spokesman let on Tuesday.Soviet-American relations stand on the edge of yet another new era, after only three years of the old one. The coming phase will be marked by drift, mounting mutual unhappiness and no new breakthroughs in negotiation or cooperation.
NEWS
September 1, 1992
What if? What if President Bush had declared Operation Florida Storm when he flew to Dade County a week ago today to inspect the damage Hurricane Andrew had wrought? What if he had immediately dispatched 20,000 troops, announced open-ended federal emergency relief and focused all his presidential powers on combating one of the greatest natural disasters in the nation's history?Would Florida Gov. Lawson Chiles have complained he was being bypassed? Would local disaster officials have had their noses out of joint?
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 11, 1990
ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE -- A self-imposed deadline came and went yesterday as White House officials began blaming congressional leaders for the latest failure to agree on a deficit-denting budget plan."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
DURHAM, N.C. -- Democratic candidates Bill Clinton and Al Gore took their celebrated campaigning-by-bus on an eighth and final swing yesterday, asking North Carolina voters to throw out of the White House next Tuesday the man they resoundingly supported four years ago.The Democratic ticket argued that President Bush, who won 58 percent of the state's vote in 1988, had his chance to bring prosperity through "trickle-down economics" but failed and that he...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Kirsten Scharnberg | December 19, 1999
In a small-town greasy spoon where the house special is a fried oyster sandwich and a waitress named June doles out kisses with coffee, three old friends gather to brag about the glory days, when they were household names who saw the limelight's spectacular glare from the best seats in the house.The first man weaves stories of presidents.The second, of kings.And the third, of far-off lands, well-loved astronauts and international intrigue."When President Bush and I were in the Middle East for Thanksgiving ..."
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Karen Hosler and Peter Honey and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 24, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The White House and the Pentagon strongly denied a report from Iraq yesterday that allied warplanes had bombed a baby formula factory near Baghdad, saying that the targeted plant was actually a disguised facility for germ warfare."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
DURHAM, N.C. -- Democratic candidates Bill Clinton and Al Gore took their celebrated campaigning-by-bus on an eighth and final swing yesterday, asking North Carolina voters to throw out of the White House next Tuesday the man they resoundingly supported four years ago.The Democratic ticket argued that President Bush, who won 58 percent of the state's vote in 1988, had his chance to bring prosperity through "trickle-down economics" but failed and that he...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 11, 1992
WASHINGTON -- One day after George Bush appeared to renew his 1988 no-new-taxes pledge, the White House yesterday insisted that the president didn't mean he would never raise taxes.Campaigning in New Jersey Wednesday, Mr. Bush said "I went along with one Democratic tax increase and I'm not going to do it again. Ever. Ever."But yesterday morning, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said the president's statement "wasn't a pledge, no. He was saying, as he's said before, that he wouldn't make that mistake again."
NEWS
September 1, 1992
What if? What if President Bush had declared Operation Florida Storm when he flew to Dade County a week ago today to inspect the damage Hurricane Andrew had wrought? What if he had immediately dispatched 20,000 troops, announced open-ended federal emergency relief and focused all his presidential powers on combating one of the greatest natural disasters in the nation's history?Would Florida Gov. Lawson Chiles have complained he was being bypassed? Would local disaster officials have had their noses out of joint?
NEWS
By Leslie H. Gelb | January 10, 1991
MARLIN FITZWATER reached near-highs of understatement and wishful thinking in responding to threats of a Soviet crackdown against deserters and draft-dodgers in seven rebellious republics.Although administration officials are hoping for a Gorbachevian miracle, everything is much worse than the White House spokesman let on Tuesday.Soviet-American relations stand on the edge of yet another new era, after only three years of the old one. The coming phase will be marked by drift, mounting mutual unhappiness and no new breakthroughs in negotiation or cooperation.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 11, 1990
ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE -- A self-imposed deadline came and went yesterday as White House officials began blaming congressional leaders for the latest failure to agree on a deficit-denting budget plan."
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 31, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The government's main economic forecasting index edged up 0.1 percent in December, the first increase in six months and a sign, many analysts said, that the economy may have begun to stabilize after falling into recession during the latter half of 1990.The report follows similar recent data on gross national product, incomes, unemployment insurance claims and orders for durable goods, all of which were less negative than many had feared.It tended to support the widely held belief that the recession will be shorter and milder than the 11-month, 2.2 percent average decline posted by the other eight postwar contractions.
NEWS
March 6, 1992
"We just want to make it clear that we want the conservatives back," said White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater after Tuesday's primaries. "We understand there is a protest vote out there, but we need help in November and we want their support." What he and President Bush really need is a refresher course in Protest 101.Not everybody voting for Pat Buchanan out of anger is a conservative. An exit poll in Maryland showed twice as many Buchanan voters described themselves as "liberal" or "moderate" as "conservative."
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