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Marlene Dietrich

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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Just when you thought you had endured the last of Midweek Madness, it's back. And, for no evident reason, it has decided to foist something truly mad on you -- "Dot's Nice, Donna Fight," sung by two great artists, Rosemary Clooney and Marlene Dietrich in the early 1950s. I heard it and I still don't believe it. But the harpsichord is such a classy touch, no?
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Just when you thought you had endured the last of Midweek Madness, it's back. And, for no evident reason, it has decided to foist something truly mad on you -- "Dot's Nice, Donna Fight," sung by two great artists, Rosemary Clooney and Marlene Dietrich in the early 1950s. I heard it and I still don't believe it. But the harpsichord is such a classy touch, no?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | December 23, 2001
Marlene Dietrich singing "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?'' in German before an Israeli audience -- this is a moment not to be missed. The concert footage is part of Marlene Dietrich: Her Own Song, a Turner Classic Movies documentary that seems almost too good to be premiering in this season of tinsel and TV dreck. But you can see it Thursday at 8 p.m. as TCM kicks off a virtual Marlene-mania of Dietrich films in connection with what would be her 100th birthday. Blonde Venus (1932), Judgment at Nuremberg (1961)
NEWS
October 1, 2006
Maureen Daly, 85, whose coming-of-age novel Seventeenth Summer in 1942 - written before her 20th birthday - was credited with launching modern young adult literature, died of non-Hodgkins lymphoma Monday at a hospice in Palm Desert, Calif. The novel became a best-seller and has sold more than 1.5 million hardcover copies and millions of paperbacks. Her other works included Sixteen and Other Stories in 1961, The Ginger Horse in 1964 and Mention My Name in Mombassa, co-written with her husband, Bill McGivern.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 7, 1992
When God created women, most of us will agree, he did a pretty good job. But when God created Dietrich, he really topped himself. And whoever said he was not merciful? He let her stay among us for 90 years, until yesterday when he could wait no longer and insisted that she join him.He created her sometime just after the turn of the century, although in her ever-mysterious way she shielded us from knowledge of the exact date. It was somewhat rudely alleged by an East German clerk who located a birth certificate that she was born in 1901 in Berlin, the daughter of an East Prussian officer who died when she was a child, and that she was raised by an aristocrat named von Losch, a cavalry lieutenant who died in the First World War.It is further asserted by various authorities that after a wrist injury precluded the possibility of a career as a concert violinist, she began her acting career in the hysterical welter of the Weimar Republic in the '20s, where, eventually, she built an unremarkable career as a somewhat plump German fraulein, in a cinema that was at that time full of plump German frauleins.
NEWS
By John F. Kelly | August 2, 1993
MARLENE DIETRICH. By Maria Riva. Knopf. 799 pages. $27.50.IF there ever was any question of the gap between the personal lives and public images of Hollywood movie stars, this book on Marlene Dietrich by her daughter, Maria Sieber Riva, should settle it forever. The legendary Dietrich, worshiped by millions, emerges asa mean, spiteful, self-centered, boozing, pill-popping witch obsessed with protecting her sex-goddess image well into her 80s.It's an utterly different portrait from that painted in Maximilian Schell's graceful documentary, "Marlene," and in recent biographies by Donald Spoto ("Blue Angel")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norah Vincent and By Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | September 24, 2000
"The Girls: Sappho Goes to Hollywood," by Diana McLellan. LA Weekly Books. 448 pages. $26.95. Until recently, it was virtually impossible in intellectual circles to proclaim yourself anti-Communist, and yet distance yourself from the rantings of Senator Joseph McCarthy. To object to the infractions of civil liberty perpetrated by the HUAC, and yet to acknowledge that Hollywood was indeed full of active Reds in the 1920s, '30s, '40s and early '50s, was to risk being tarred a paranoid. After all, one had scant proof of sedition at one's disposal until only a few years ago, when the Venona File was published (a series of intercepted messages exchanged between Moscow and various American operatives)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1996
As a public service, I have included no shows airing between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. You may watch Opening Day in peace."As the World Turns" (2 p.m.-3 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- The soap celebrates four decades on the tube with a show including clips of such famous alumnae as Meg Ryan, Julianne Moore and Marisa Tomei. CBS."Nova" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Benjamin Spock, the man responsible for getting an entire generation of babies off on the right foot (or messing them up (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
NEWS
May 15, 1991
Bernard Ozer, a merchandiser at Associated Merchandising Corp. who turned low-budget clothing into fashion trends, died Sunday in New York of heart disease at age 60. Mr. Ozer was credited with discovering plastic sandals that became "jellies" on beaches in Yugoslavia and with popularizing the bicycle shorts of New York City bicycle messengers.Harry Slochower, who lost his teaching job in German and comparative literature at Brooklyn College in 1952 after refusing to tell a congressional committee whether he had been a Communist Party member, died Saturday at age 90. In 1956 he was reinstated when the Supreme Court ruled he had been denied due process.
NEWS
October 1, 2006
Maureen Daly, 85, whose coming-of-age novel Seventeenth Summer in 1942 - written before her 20th birthday - was credited with launching modern young adult literature, died of non-Hodgkins lymphoma Monday at a hospice in Palm Desert, Calif. The novel became a best-seller and has sold more than 1.5 million hardcover copies and millions of paperbacks. Her other works included Sixteen and Other Stories in 1961, The Ginger Horse in 1964 and Mention My Name in Mombassa, co-written with her husband, Bill McGivern.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | December 23, 2001
Marlene Dietrich singing "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?'' in German before an Israeli audience -- this is a moment not to be missed. The concert footage is part of Marlene Dietrich: Her Own Song, a Turner Classic Movies documentary that seems almost too good to be premiering in this season of tinsel and TV dreck. But you can see it Thursday at 8 p.m. as TCM kicks off a virtual Marlene-mania of Dietrich films in connection with what would be her 100th birthday. Blonde Venus (1932), Judgment at Nuremberg (1961)
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2000
Virginia Corrigan Tracy, a journalist and working mother who took her children along when she interviewed Cary Grant, died Friday at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 97. In a career that spanned six decades and three Baltimore newspapers, Mrs. Tracy interviewed celebrities from Charles A. Lindbergh to Alfred Hitchcock. She overcame arthritis, partial deafness and the reluctance of an earlier era's newspaper editors to hire working mothers. While covering the cultural scene for The Sun in the 1940s and 1950s, she often went to the opera or the symphony with her four children - and their homework - in tow. The children went along while she covered the christening of a newly built ship or hobnobbed with stars at opening-night parties at the Lyric Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norah Vincent and By Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | September 24, 2000
"The Girls: Sappho Goes to Hollywood," by Diana McLellan. LA Weekly Books. 448 pages. $26.95. Until recently, it was virtually impossible in intellectual circles to proclaim yourself anti-Communist, and yet distance yourself from the rantings of Senator Joseph McCarthy. To object to the infractions of civil liberty perpetrated by the HUAC, and yet to acknowledge that Hollywood was indeed full of active Reds in the 1920s, '30s, '40s and early '50s, was to risk being tarred a paranoid. After all, one had scant proof of sedition at one's disposal until only a few years ago, when the Venona File was published (a series of intercepted messages exchanged between Moscow and various American operatives)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Schwarzbaum and Lisa Schwarzbaum,Special to the Sun | October 10, 1999
"A Positively Final Appearance," by Alec Guinness. Viking. 256 pages. $23.95.That he starred in "Oliver Twist" and "Star Wars" is almost beside the point. That he published "My Name Escapes Me," a well-received, very similar book of observations and old-age free-associations just two years ago is neither here nor there.Alec Guinness, now the knighted, Sir Alec, of 85, writes with such unfussed dignity and unshowy erudition that I would gladly embrace "A Positively Final Appearance" -- a journal that picks up where his previous book left off in 1996 and continues through 1998 -- just to find out what he has to say about rereading Trollope, restocking his Hampshire fish pond, admiring his dogs and burying his friends.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Teachout and Elizabeth Teachout,Special to the Sun | July 28, 1996
"Noel Coward: A Biography," by Philip Hoare. Simon & Schuster, 544 pages, $30."A Talent to Amuse" is the epitaph inscribed on Noel Coward's memorial stone in Westminster Abbey. It's a line from one of Coward's songs, "If Love Were All," and it sums up his claim to fame: He was the most amusing man of his generation.He wrote, directed and starred in such witty plays as "Private Lives" and "Hay Fever," which made him the world's highest-paid author by the end of 1931; his songs quickly became mainstays of the cabaret repertoire.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1996
As a public service, I have included no shows airing between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. You may watch Opening Day in peace."As the World Turns" (2 p.m.-3 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- The soap celebrates four decades on the tube with a show including clips of such famous alumnae as Meg Ryan, Julianne Moore and Marisa Tomei. CBS."Nova" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Benjamin Spock, the man responsible for getting an entire generation of babies off on the right foot (or messing them up (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | May 15, 1992
Berlin Twilight came down Leberstrasse like a long slow fadeout at (( the end of a movie, and finally the flat where Marlene Dietrich was born was dark except for the flickering blue light of a $H television set.The small parade of news people who had come to Leberstrasse 65 had dwindled to one photographer and a single reporter."
FEATURES
June 4, 1994
Thanks for the memories, Sun readers. We received almost 50 responses on the Sundial telephone information service when we asked for anecdotes from those who lived during World War II and found bright spots of humor that helped pull them through the bad times.Even taking into account that the fish grows larger each time the story is told, this selection of remembrances represents the tales we heard from men who fought and women who tended the home front.One shoe waylaid amid hugs and kissesI was working for the war department in downtown San Francisco on VJ-Day.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | November 1, 1994
New York -- It's looking like a long, hot summer ahead as leading American designers begin unveiling their next year's collections here for buyers and press. Whew. Unseasonably warm weather for the first shows had black-clad and booted fashion watchers sweltering, but the real steam was on the runways.Fashion is getting so hot that designers are stripping women down to their slips and calling them dresses. These are grandmothers' good slips, however, lace-trimmed satin and charmeuse with clever seaming and bias cuts to follow the curves of the body.
FEATURES
June 4, 1994
Thanks for the memories, Sun readers. We received almost 50 responses on the Sundial telephone information service when we asked for anecdotes from those who lived during World War II and found bright spots of humor that helped pull them through the bad times.Even taking into account that the fish grows larger each time the story is told, this selection of remembrances represents the tales we heard from men who fought and women who tended the home front.One shoe waylaid amid hugs and kissesI was working for the war department in downtown San Francisco on VJ-Day.
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