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Lorraine Mirabella | June 17, 2013
Retailers plagued by slow sales might want to seek customers outside the U.S. -- places, for instance, such as Brazil, Chile and Uruguay. Those countries top a 2013 ranking of developing countries for retail investment by consultant A.T. Kearney. "South America is blossoming," the report says, thanks to increased consumer confidence amid a strong and growing middle class, controlled inflation, sustained economic growth and continued economic and political stability. Louis Vuitton, Cartier, Yves Saint Laurent, Emporio Armani and Calvin Klein opened or have plans to open stores in Uruguay.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
  The folks at The Food Market have truffles on their mind -- black truffles, white truffles, black and white truffles together.  Chef Chad Gauss will be featuring those lovely truffles at 7 p.m. Thursday in a "One-Night Truffle Dinner. " The four-course menu, plus dessert, will be served in the Hampden restaurant's lower-level communal dining space, The Private Kitchen -- which we were just waiting for the right time to tell you existed. This is that time. The four-course menu includes a black-truffle Brussels sprouts Caesar salad, a soy and white truffle tuna tartare, black and white lobster tail with risotto and truffled red meat with potatoes and rosemary.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
This week there were fewer than 500 homes on the market in San Francisco. Meanwhile, within Baltimore's city limits there were nearly 2,800, according to online real estate brokerage Redfin. In the spirit of the Super Bowl, the techie real estate firm has compiled a set of statistics comparing the housing markets that surround M&T Bank Stadium and Candlestick Park. Here are some of the other tidbits Redfin collected about the Super Bowl cities: In December, the median price for a single-family home in Baltimore was $145,000; in San Francisco it was $822,000.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Cereal makers have long designed eye-catching boxes to lure children to supermarket breakfast aisles. Now, grocers and produce companies are turning to Big Bird and other "Sesame Street" characters in an effort to make fruits and vegetables just as appealing. An emerging national movement that uses the Muppets to market vegetables to preschoolers got a foothold in Baltimore last week when it was adopted by two area businesses — Mars Super Markets and Savage-based East Coast Fresh, a Mars vendor and processor of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2000
Because financial markets were closed yesterday for Thanksgiving, no tables appear in today's editions. Stock markets will close today at 1 p.m. and bond markets will close at 2 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Starting June 1, there will be fewer restrictions for Maryland wineries that want to sell wine and offer samples at farmers' markets. New rules passed by the General Assembly and signed by Gov. Martin O'Malley will remove limits on the number of days a winery can attend markets each year. “There were a number of restrictions in the law that kept wineries from attending as many markets as they like,” said Kevin Atticks, executive director of the Maryland Wineries Association.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Baltimore is one of the best cities in the U.S. for homebuyers, according to a recent analysis from online housing market data firm Zillow. “Zillow analyzed data on actual sales prices compared to asking prices, the number of days listings spent on Zillow and the percentage of homes on the market with a price cut and ranked the 30 largest metro areas in the country to determine whether buyers or sellers have more negotiating power in a given market,”...
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | May 29, 2012
In my previous column, I argued that American citizen-consumers seem far more likely to complain about government failures than about similar problems arising in the free market. Waste, fraud, inefficiency and other frustrations resulting from government action are considered endemic, yet similar patterns of failure in the private sector are discounted if not overlooked. Responding either by email to me directly or via letter to the editor, several readers protested that a key distinction I failed to acknowledge is that government is a monopoly that permits citizens no alternative, whereas pluralistic, competitive markets allow consumers to take their business elsewhere.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | May 15, 2012
This column may stress you out. It stressed me out just writing it. Start counting on your fingers how many of the following aggravations you have encountered personally. Ready? •You call a customer line to report a problem with some product or service, and after being forced to navigate through a multi-stage menu of options, you finally get a live person - who, unfortunately, seems capable of responding to only small set of basic requests. •You file an insurance claim, but the paperwork and documentation required to get the claim paid seem intentionally convoluted so as to deter you from ever collecting.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
Bank of America said Wednesday that an executive with 31 years at the company will step up as president of the institution's Baltimore and Maryland markets. David Millman's past positions at Bank of America include leadership roles in consumer banking and global commercial banking. He's replacing William Couper, the company's mid-Atlantic president, who plans to retire at the end of September after 40 years with Bank of America. Millman, born in Baltimore, lives in Owings Mills with wife Holly.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Under Armour has overtaken Adidas this year in combined apparel and footwear sales to become the second biggest sports brand in the United States. Baltimore-based Under Armour had U.S. apparel and footwear sales of $1.2 billion through the end of August, edging ahead of Adidas with $1.1 billion total U.S. sales, according to a Sterne Agee report citing sales figures from SportScanInfo. Under Armour sales have jumped 20 percent this year, while Adidas combined sales have plummeted 23 percent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
We love a good anniversary. Baltimore is about to host a huge, weeklong celebration for the 200th anniversary of "The Star-Spangled Banner. " Unless they're traveling by frigate, everybody and his brother is going to be passing through Locust Point on the way to Fort McHenry. Also celebrating - Locust Point's own Wine Market Bistro, which is marking its 10th anniversary this month with various promotions and by feting diners with complimentary hors d'ouevres and wine tastings. The restaurant has earned the celebration.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Regarding Dan Rodericks' column on those computer-guided rifles, may I just say that I am thrilled that the gun manufacturers and their puppet, the NRA, are planning to make these "cop killer" weapons cheaper and more widely available ( "As technology advances, guns become deadlier, 'smarter,'" Aug. 26). Remember, these are the guns the Navy Seals used to kill those Somali pirates with shots to the head at long range aboard a moving ship. With these things you simply can't miss from almost a mile away.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
John Bruce Innes Jr., a former marketing executive for Genesis Health Ventures who was later a senior housing consultant, died July 22 of brain injuries suffered in a fall while he was vacationing in Greece. The Lutherville resident was 70. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Springfield, Pa., he was the son of John B. Innes Sr., a chemist, and Marion Rohrer Innes, a teacher. A 1962 graduate of Springfield High School, where he was on the school's newspaper editing staff, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at George Washington University, where he belonged to the Kappa Sigma Fraternity and was Inter-Fraternity Council president.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
At the Target in Baltimore's Mondawmin Mall, megaphone-shaped "college" signs hang over aisles stocked with must-haves for students living on their own, such as mini-refrigerators, desk lamps and six-packs of ramen noodles. "Back to College" is a well-stocked department at Target and many other stores this time of year. It's no wonder. The college market represents the biggest chunk of back-to-school shopping, which itself is the second-biggest season for retailers after the holiday season.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
Henry B. Mann Jr., a retired Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. marketing manager and World War II veteran, died Aug. 4 of complications from dementia at Envoy of Denton, a nursing home. He was 93. The son of Henry B. Mann Sr., an attorney, and Amelia R. Mann, a homemaker, Henry Bond Mann Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Evergreen Avenue in Hamilton. After graduating in 1938 from Polytechnic Institute, Mr. Mann began working for C&P Telephone. In 1942, he enlisted in the Army and served with Company B, 53rd Signal Battalion in Europe.
NEWS
January 20, 1995
Few municipal activities are more likely to flourish free of the clumsy hand of political flunkies than the city's public markets. Several are struggling, and none is prospering as much as it should. Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has wisely decided to turn over the operation of five of the six neighborhood markets to a private, non-profit corporation. That body is asked to wean the markets from an annual public subsidy approaching $1 million and allow them to blossom with imaginative marketing and competent management, both of which have been conspicuously lacking for decades.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
At first, Baldwin Homes didn't build green. Then it dipped its corporate toe in - one home here, another there. Now the Gambrills company is constructing an entire green neighborhood. It's the story of U.S. home building writ small. Green accounted for 2 percent of the new-home market in 2005, according to a report by industry data provider McGraw Hill Construction. By last year it had ballooned to 23 percent - nearly a quarter. "I don't think green is a niche market anymore," said Michele A. Russo, director of green content at McGraw Hill Construction.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
The number of homes for sale in the Baltimore metro region climbed to the highest level in nearly three years last month, but closed sales failed to follow suit, a mismatch that reflects weakness in the housing market, analysts said. Sales in Baltimore City and the five surrounding counties dipped in July, falling 2 percent to 2,945, according to a monthly report published Monday. Meanwhile, the number of homes on the market rose 22.5 percent year-over-year, reaching 13,856 — more than any time since November 2011, according to the data provided by RealEstate Business Intelligence, a subsidiary of the MRIS multiple listing service.
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