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Marketplace Fairness Act

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NEWS
November 18, 2012
As the owner of a flower shop in Aberdeen, I am very concerned with new legislation currently being considered in Congress: the "Marketplace Fairness Act" and the "Marketplace Equity Act," which will add sales tax to Internet sales. This will disproportionately impact small businesses like mine - creating a significant administrative and financial burden that will make it necessary for me to pass on additional costs to my customers. In today's economy, it is irresponsible to place additional burdens on small businesses, which are the engine of our economy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 21, 2014
Congress needs to pass the Marketplace Fairness Act (MFA) so there is real and fair competition reflecting 21st century commerce. America was built on promoting economic growth and business in a fashion that ensures fair competition for all. Today, online-only retailers are not required to charge and collect sales tax, while local businesses must. However, the sales tax (in all but five states) is still owed. The collection of these taxes is difficult to enforce unless online sellers have either a physical store or a warehouse within the state.
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NEWS
May 21, 2014
Congress needs to pass the Marketplace Fairness Act (MFA) so there is real and fair competition reflecting 21st century commerce. America was built on promoting economic growth and business in a fashion that ensures fair competition for all. Today, online-only retailers are not required to charge and collect sales tax, while local businesses must. However, the sales tax (in all but five states) is still owed. The collection of these taxes is difficult to enforce unless online sellers have either a physical store or a warehouse within the state.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
When Amazon.com opens a huge distribution center next year in Southeast Baltimore, consumers across the state who buy books, electronics, toys or anything else from the online seller will no longer be able to avoid the state's 6 percent sales tax. Consumers might not like it, but that's just fine with many retailers in Maryland, who say the online giant enjoyed that competitive advantage for too long. Seattle-based Amazon announced plans Tuesday to open a 1 million-square-foot warehouse that will employ 1,000 full-time workers at the site of the former General Motors plan on Broening Highway, a move welcomed by city and state officials.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
The Senate voted Monday to allow states to assess a sales tax on purchases from Amazon.com, eBay and other online retailers in a bipartisan measure that would also reduce the increase planned for Maryland's gas tax. The bill, which passed 69-27, would resolve a long-standing complaint of brick-and-mortar business owners, who say they struggle to compete with online companies that don't charge sales tax. The legislation requires Internet sellers to...
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 11, 2013
In 1998, when President Bill Clinton signed the bipartisan Internet Tax Freedom Act, which prohibited state and local taxation of Internet access and Internet-only services, the purpose was to promote the commercial potential of the Internet, especially for start-ups and small businesses. Congress extended the bill three times, the latest until 2014. Now there's the Marketplace Fairness Act, which, writes The Washington Post, "would allow states and local governments to require large Internet retailers and other 'remote sellers' with sales over $1 million annually to collect sales taxes and send the revenue to the appropriate location.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2013
Online shoppers would have to pay state sales taxes on more purchases under legislation that advanced in the U.S. Senate on Monday - but Marylanders could also wind up paying a smaller increase in gasoline taxes. Bricks-and-mortar stores have long sought changes to a federal law that they say gives online companies such as eBay an advantage: Most Internet retailers don't charge sales tax, and most consumers ignore requirements to declare their online purchases for state taxing purposes.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
When Amazon.com opens a huge distribution center next year in Southeast Baltimore, consumers across the state who buy books, electronics, toys or anything else from the online seller will no longer be able to avoid the state's 6 percent sales tax. Consumers might not like it, but that's just fine with many retailers in Maryland, who say the online giant enjoyed that competitive advantage for too long. Seattle-based Amazon announced plans Tuesday to open a 1 million-square-foot warehouse that will employ 1,000 full-time workers at the site of the former General Motors plan on Broening Highway, a move welcomed by city and state officials.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 11, 2013
In 1998, when President Bill Clinton signed the bipartisan Internet Tax Freedom Act, which prohibited state and local taxation of Internet access and Internet-only services, the purpose was to promote the commercial potential of the Internet, especially for start-ups and small businesses. Congress extended the bill three times, the latest until 2014. Now there's the Marketplace Fairness Act, which, writes The Washington Post, "would allow states and local governments to require large Internet retailers and other 'remote sellers' with sales over $1 million annually to collect sales taxes and send the revenue to the appropriate location.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
The Senate voted Monday to allow states to assess a sales tax on purchases from Amazon.com, eBay and other online retailers in a bipartisan measure that would also reduce the increase planned for Maryland's gas tax. The bill, which passed 69-27, would resolve a long-standing complaint of brick-and-mortar business owners, who say they struggle to compete with online companies that don't charge sales tax. The legislation requires Internet sellers to...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2013
Online shoppers would have to pay state sales taxes on more purchases under legislation that advanced in the U.S. Senate on Monday - but Marylanders could also wind up paying a smaller increase in gasoline taxes. Bricks-and-mortar stores have long sought changes to a federal law that they say gives online companies such as eBay an advantage: Most Internet retailers don't charge sales tax, and most consumers ignore requirements to declare their online purchases for state taxing purposes.
NEWS
November 18, 2012
As the owner of a flower shop in Aberdeen, I am very concerned with new legislation currently being considered in Congress: the "Marketplace Fairness Act" and the "Marketplace Equity Act," which will add sales tax to Internet sales. This will disproportionately impact small businesses like mine - creating a significant administrative and financial burden that will make it necessary for me to pass on additional costs to my customers. In today's economy, it is irresponsible to place additional burdens on small businesses, which are the engine of our economy.
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