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NEWS
September 16, 1990
Baltimore's six municipally-operated markets may be a throwback in time. But they also are a unique asset. No other American city boasts such a comprehensive network of neighborhood markets where people can buy fresh produce, meats or fish from a merchant who greets them by name. Robert L. Kinsey's family has been selling veal and lamb from the same stall at Hollins Market since 1889.Now comes a proposal from a group of merchants at Northeast Market to buy that 105-year-old brick building, recently renovated at the cost of $2.75 million, from the city for $1 million.
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NEWS
July 13, 2013
Vann Ellison is right about three things in his recent commentary on poverty and social enterprise ("Beyond government," July 10): Our country hasn't done an effective job of addressing poverty. Partisan gridlock weakens the social safety net and social enterprises can be effective in getting people back to work, even if they can't ensure wages sufficient for them to afford market-rate housing. Unfortunately, Mr. Ellison misses the mark on just about everything else. That poverty persists in the richest nation in the history of history is worthy of serious exploration.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | July 29, 1992
You would think that James Warren would be the Maytag Repairman of politicians, the loneliest one in America.After all, he is the presidential candidate of the Socialist Workers Party, holding high the banner of proletarian revolution at a time when collective economies are crumbling worldwide and capitalism is idolized.But Mr. Warren rejects that conventional wisdom. "This is the best time to be a socialist since the Russian revolution," he declares.Mr. Warren, 40, a steel worker in Chicago, yesterday wound up a three-day trip to Maryland and campaigned outside the Bethlehem Steel Corp.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2011
The cardboard models showed what a new town hall near Cross Street Market in Federal Hill could look like. The graduate architecture students at Morgan State University crowded around professor Sanjit Roy as he critiqued the miniature buildings one by one. Roy picked up one model, carved out a section with an Exacto knife and reattached it at another spot to demonstrate how to improve the flow. "An urban site is ultimately all about movement," Roy told the students, and sent them back to their workstations to make revisions.
NEWS
By CHRISTIANNA MCCAUSLAND and CHRISTIANNA MCCAUSLAND,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2005
Bill Blueford may be the oldest fixture in Cross Street Market. When it reopened two weeks ago after a $1.3 million renovation, the market in Federal Hill looked like a spit-polished shoe. There were new floors, a new brick facade, decorative shutters and improved lighting. Amid the glow of this promising urban renewal was Blueford, 89, sitting in Big Jim's Deli, enjoying a cup of coffee. Watching old friends and new urbanites filter through the market over the lip of his Styrofoam cup, Blueford symbolizes the story of Baltimore's markets, a story of tradition meeting technology and history competing with convenience.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2000
Way up on tiptoes, they raise their voices and point. That's the way customers order at Chuckie's Chicken in Hollins Market, the oldest market in the city, where some stalls are so high you can barely see over them. "Unless you read lips, it's hard," said Irvin Kaplan, who has owned his stall longer than anyone else still selling in the market and virtually raised his son Chuckie, now of chicken fame, there. The up-on-the-toes ritual is about to change. The stalls will be lowered, the aisles will be widened and the worn concrete floors will soon be turned to tile at the Southwest Baltimore market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Williams and By Larry Williams,Sun Staff | January 19, 2003
Have greed, corruption and fear so seriously damaged the great American market system that the nation faces serious long-term economic decline? The evidence supporting that dire possibility has accumulated relentlessly in recent months. The markets -- whose long-term growth have funded millions of comfortable retirements, swelled the wealth of our social institutions and turned an army of union workers into eager capitalists -- have lost a breathtaking $7 trillion in wealth over the last three years.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Vann Ellison is right about three things in his recent commentary on poverty and social enterprise ("Beyond government," July 10): Our country hasn't done an effective job of addressing poverty. Partisan gridlock weakens the social safety net and social enterprises can be effective in getting people back to work, even if they can't ensure wages sufficient for them to afford market-rate housing. Unfortunately, Mr. Ellison misses the mark on just about everything else. That poverty persists in the richest nation in the history of history is worthy of serious exploration.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2011
The cardboard models showed what a new town hall near Cross Street Market in Federal Hill could look like. The graduate architecture students at Morgan State University crowded around professor Sanjit Roy as he critiqued the miniature buildings one by one. Roy picked up one model, carved out a section with an Exacto knife and reattached it at another spot to demonstrate how to improve the flow. "An urban site is ultimately all about movement," Roy told the students, and sent them back to their workstations to make revisions.
NEWS
September 2, 2010
Won't wonders never cease, CEO's getting a big bulk of the money while the hospitals continue to harass people over unpaid bills ("Hospital CEO pay is sweet," Aug. 29). I know one family out here in Harford County that lost everything they had, including their home, because they couldn't afford a hospital bill of over $30,000, and then having to read that the CEO of that very same hospital pulled in $7 million a year, it sort of makes me wonder about the doctors' creed that they will do no harm.
NEWS
September 2, 2010
Won't wonders never cease, CEO's getting a big bulk of the money while the hospitals continue to harass people over unpaid bills ("Hospital CEO pay is sweet," Aug. 29). I know one family out here in Harford County that lost everything they had, including their home, because they couldn't afford a hospital bill of over $30,000, and then having to read that the CEO of that very same hospital pulled in $7 million a year, it sort of makes me wonder about the doctors' creed that they will do no harm.
NEWS
By Charles Scott, Fred Derrick and Andrew Samuel | March 29, 2010
On the face of it, the market for automotive maintenance, Wall Street, and health care seem unrelated. But they all have a common problem. Most of us become nervous when a mechanic tells us that a relatively new car that we have brought in for routine maintenance needs parts replaced that (by the way) will cost $750 plus labor. One is left feeling helpless in trying to decide whether the mechanic is telling the truth or ripping us off. Although not every mechanic is a cheat, we all know that there is some truth to this stereotype.
NEWS
By CHRISTIANNA MCCAUSLAND and CHRISTIANNA MCCAUSLAND,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2005
Bill Blueford may be the oldest fixture in Cross Street Market. When it reopened two weeks ago after a $1.3 million renovation, the market in Federal Hill looked like a spit-polished shoe. There were new floors, a new brick facade, decorative shutters and improved lighting. Amid the glow of this promising urban renewal was Blueford, 89, sitting in Big Jim's Deli, enjoying a cup of coffee. Watching old friends and new urbanites filter through the market over the lip of his Styrofoam cup, Blueford symbolizes the story of Baltimore's markets, a story of tradition meeting technology and history competing with convenience.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 19, 2004
NEW YORK - The chief executive of the New York Stock Exchange defended its market makers and its 211-year-old trading model yesterday, arguing that the changes he has put in place over the past month should be sufficient to appease the Big Board's critics. The remarks of the exchange's chief, John A. Thain, came just two days before he is scheduled to testify before a congressional panel on the viability of the exchange's trading system, which relies on a network of specialist traders to guide investors to the best possible price for a stock.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Williams and By Larry Williams,Sun Staff | January 19, 2003
Have greed, corruption and fear so seriously damaged the great American market system that the nation faces serious long-term economic decline? The evidence supporting that dire possibility has accumulated relentlessly in recent months. The markets -- whose long-term growth have funded millions of comfortable retirements, swelled the wealth of our social institutions and turned an army of union workers into eager capitalists -- have lost a breathtaking $7 trillion in wealth over the last three years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 21, 2001
SHANGHAI, China - President Bush declared yesterday that the two American soldiers killed in an accident Friday - the first major U.S. casualties in South Asia - "died in a cause that was just and was right," and he told leaders of the 21 nations assembled here for an annual summit meeting that the terrorists who struck the World Trade Center were trying to bring about a collapse of world markets. It is the first time that he has suggested that the terrorist network al-Qaida was seeking to "shatter confidence in the world economic system."
NEWS
By Charles Scott, Fred Derrick and Andrew Samuel | March 29, 2010
On the face of it, the market for automotive maintenance, Wall Street, and health care seem unrelated. But they all have a common problem. Most of us become nervous when a mechanic tells us that a relatively new car that we have brought in for routine maintenance needs parts replaced that (by the way) will cost $750 plus labor. One is left feeling helpless in trying to decide whether the mechanic is telling the truth or ripping us off. Although not every mechanic is a cheat, we all know that there is some truth to this stereotype.
NEWS
October 26, 2000
NEARLY 300,000 state workers, teachers and retirees can rest easy: Their pensions are now fully secured. There's enough in state retirement accounts to handle future pension obligations. That's a stunning change from 16 years ago, when the state faced a $16 billion unfunded liability. Actuaries last week announced state pension accounts contain 101 percent of what is needed to pay all retirement costs. That's 20 years ahead of schedule. How did it happen? First, the legislature in 1984 reduced pensions for new workers.
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