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BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | February 14, 2001
VALENTINE'S DAY: "Don't ever fall in love with a stock. It can break your heart." (Frank Cappiello, locally based mutual fund manager) BUFFETT'S BUYS: "Warren Buffett finally finds the market moving his way," says Money, March. "He's snapping up building-products firms. Purchases include brick maker Justin Industries Inc., carpet maker Shaw Industries Ltd. and building-products manufacturer Johns Manville Corp. "Buffett found value in smaller positions too, including building materials company USG Corp.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 5, 2008
NEW YORK - The Dow Jones industrial average plummeted 345 points yesterday on a confluence of poor news about the economy, although investors could not pin the drop on any overriding reason. Reports showed that retail sales were weak in August, just as more Americans filed for unemployment benefits. Anxiety lingered about a global slowdown. Fears of another financial crisis refused to go away. None of the news came as a shock to Wall Street. So what pushed the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index down 3 percent, its worst daily performance in three months?
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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 12, 1999
WOULD YOU LIKE more income?"This is a great time for investors to build a position in high-yielding, high-grade preferred stocks," says Richard Young's Intelligence Report. "We see yields in the 8 percent range. Retired, yield-oriented and just plain conservative investors find preferreds a better choice every day. Our favored new issue is Bank One Capital I 8 percent preferred."TAX TIP: Between now and Dec. 31, do not buy any mutual fund until after the fund has declared its year-end capital gain dividend.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | June 24, 2007
For investors, the second half of the year won't exactly be coasting. Subprime mortgage concerns, speculation about interest rates and the early maneuverings of presidential campaigns will influence stock market psychology. There is optimism about the economy and company profits. But it is tempered by the reality that a rambunctious stock market's stellar days are just as capable of sliding into the negative. Mention the possibility of hurricanes affecting the energy pipeline or Asian markets experiencing a sharp correction, for example, and the mood immediately turns somber.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2002
The steady rate at which investors have been pulling money out of the stock market comes from a lack of confidence that will not necessarily be restored by a few up days in the market, experts said. Investors want to see clearer signs that the economy is improving and that corporate profits are growing. They are also worried about what a protracted war with Iraq could do to the country, experts said. "We are suffering a crisis of confidence," said Alan Ackerman, a market strategist with Fahnestock & Co. in New York.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | December 1, 2000
Are you looking for good values in the stock market? "This is bargain season," says Michael Burke's Outlook. "Among stocks with recent selling climaxes [hitting 12-month lows] we find AT&T Corp., Black & Decker Corp., Estee Lauder Cos. Inc., General Motors Corp., Microsoft Corp., Motorola Inc., Texas Instruments Inc., Blockbuster Inc., Boise Cascade Corp., Georgia Pacific Corp. and International Paper Co." SPEAKING OF STOCKS: "If you put just $25 a week into stocks that gain 10 percent a year [or just under the 10.2 percent annual return for stocks over the past 70 years]
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | October 3, 2001
WITH a cloudy future, what stocks should we buy? This week's Barron's, dated Oct. 1, runs a cover story listing "25 Great Values in a Depressed Market." The following stocks are included with (in parentheses) estimated 2002 price-earnings ratios: General Electric Co. (22); Exxon Mobil Corp. (18); SBC Communications Inc. (18); Merck & Co., Inc. (18); AOL Time Warner Inc. (20); Procter & Gamble Co. (21); Fannie Mae (14) and Tyco International Ltd. (13.) The article adds, "Many of these stocks are selling for around 20 times next year's earnings, considered a relatively reasonable multiple."
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | November 23, 2001
WHAT are America's most popular stocks? From December's Money magazine, here are the most widely held stocks in America: American International Group Inc., AOL Time Warner Inc., AT&T Corp., Cisco Systems Inc., Citigroup Inc., Coca-Cola Co., Dell Computer Corp.' Walt Disney Co., EMC Corp. and ExxonMobil Corp. The "most widely held" list was created by comparing lists of top mutual fund holdings, investment club picks and companies with the largest number of shares outstanding. TURKEY HASH: "Total assets in 401(k)
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | October 27, 2000
Investing in real estate usually means making a six-figure commitment and dealing with the proverbial midnight call to fix the tenant's plumbing," says Black Enterprise. "But there's another way to buy property without those headaches - real estate funds. "This year, performance of such funds has been rock solid. The average real estate fund returned 21 percent for the year 2000 ending July 31, compared to a negative two percent for the S&P 500. See your broker for details." BOUQUETS & BRICKBATS: "Fleetwood Enterprises Inc. has discounted all but the end of the world.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | October 28, 1998
WHAT HAPPENS TO stocks when a president gets into trouble? "The last time a president faced impeachment," says Fortune magazine, "the Dow average plunged 40 percent. Things were grim then, but today we're not plagued by long gasoline lines, runaway inflation and recession.""With stocks fluctuating wildly, make volatility work for you by 'dollar-cost-averaging,' " says Money magazine. "With stocks more volatile than in 50 years, invest a fixed sum at specific intervals, thereby picking up more low-priced shares when stocks fall."
BUSINESS
By THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS | October 4, 2005
Stocks will have to put on quite a show in the fourth quarter to match last year's returns, or even many analysts' current forecasts. Last year at this time, stocks were in about the same position as now - flat to down for the year. The market rallied after the presidential election and pushed the Standard & Poor's 500 index to a 9 percent gain for the year. This year, fallout from hurricanes and interest-rate increases may stand in the way of such a happy ending. The good news for investors is that history is on their side.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | November 14, 2004
It's often said that parents shouldn't take too much credit for a child who turns out great or assume too much blame for a child with problems. After all, many other factors entered into that complicated equation. The same can be said for the economy. Our nation has affirmed through a heated campaign and tight election the importance of the U.S. president, who has power over regulatory bodies, appoints the Federal Reserve chairman and presents tax proposals that Congress must decide upon.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | August 8, 2004
WALL STREET is throwing a sale, and you probably didn't even know it. It costs only $19 these days to buy $1 in proven profits thrown off by the big corporations in Standard & Poor's 500 index. That's a milestone, the cheapest in more than seven years, but investors are focused on terrorism, oil and jobs. Maybe they're missing something. Not long ago $1 in S&P 500 profits cost stock investors more than $50. (The same as saying the price-to-earnings ratio was over 50.) Last month the S&P 500's price-to-earnings gauge dipped under 20 for the first time since March 1997, when Goldman Sachs seer Abby Joseph Cohen was proclaiming, "the U.S. bull market is intact."
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | December 28, 2003
ENJOY THIS year's stock market returns. Gains next year won't be at this level again, say market experts offering advice on the best investment opportunities for 2004. The Nasdaq composite index, loaded with technology stocks, is up nearly 48 percent for the year. The Dow Jones industrial average of 30 blue-chip stocks and the broader S&P 500 index have gained around 24 percent. "We had paradise in 2003. Keep in mind, we had to deal with a war in Iraq, continued war on terrorism, more greed exposed on the New York Stock Exchange, more scandals in the mutual fund industry, but we overcame all this," said Al Goldman, chief market strategist with A.G. Edwards & Sons in St. Louis.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2003
If January is any indication of what lies ahead for the stock market, 2003 may be another exasperating year for investors who have seen their portfolios dwindle for three years straight. Blame it on corporate scandals, looming war with Iraq, a sluggish economy, tanking consumer confidence, weak corporate spending, the falling dollar, rising oil prices or just about any economic indicator making headlines recently. The bottom line is that investors are increasingly discovering that they are alone in a wilderness of uncertainty.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2002
The steady rate at which investors have been pulling money out of the stock market comes from a lack of confidence that will not necessarily be restored by a few up days in the market, experts said. Investors want to see clearer signs that the economy is improving and that corporate profits are growing. They are also worried about what a protracted war with Iraq could do to the country, experts said. "We are suffering a crisis of confidence," said Alan Ackerman, a market strategist with Fahnestock & Co. in New York.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 17, 1999
MANY PEOPLE ask if they should buy a stock when the company announces a stock split.Never buy a stock just because it's going to split. But if it's a good company and you buy the stock before it splits, you will save on commissions and probably show a profit, too.The AAII Journal says: "Stocks of firms that announce splits generally move higher at the time of the announcement, generally advancing 3.5 to 4.5 percent. Investors feel a split announcement is a positive signal about future earnings.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1998
When it comes to the world's capital markets, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan has the amiable demeanor of Clark Kent and the power of a Superman -- though unlike the comic-book hero he seems impervious to the Kryptonite powers of economic and political pressure.Many Fed watchers say that it was the mere hint of lower interest rates -- in a speech given by Greenspan Friday night at the University of California, Berkeley -- that sparked yesterday's 380.53-point jump in the Dow Jones industrial average.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | November 23, 2001
WHAT are America's most popular stocks? From December's Money magazine, here are the most widely held stocks in America: American International Group Inc., AOL Time Warner Inc., AT&T Corp., Cisco Systems Inc., Citigroup Inc., Coca-Cola Co., Dell Computer Corp.' Walt Disney Co., EMC Corp. and ExxonMobil Corp. The "most widely held" list was created by comparing lists of top mutual fund holdings, investment club picks and companies with the largest number of shares outstanding. TURKEY HASH: "Total assets in 401(k)
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | October 3, 2001
WITH a cloudy future, what stocks should we buy? This week's Barron's, dated Oct. 1, runs a cover story listing "25 Great Values in a Depressed Market." The following stocks are included with (in parentheses) estimated 2002 price-earnings ratios: General Electric Co. (22); Exxon Mobil Corp. (18); SBC Communications Inc. (18); Merck & Co., Inc. (18); AOL Time Warner Inc. (20); Procter & Gamble Co. (21); Fannie Mae (14) and Tyco International Ltd. (13.) The article adds, "Many of these stocks are selling for around 20 times next year's earnings, considered a relatively reasonable multiple."
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